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Early Cast of Parthenon East Frieze Early 19th century cast of part of the east frieze of the Parthenon. Subsequent to this cast being taken the original block suffered further damage being badly broken and the figures seen here are now in much poorer condition (some having been virtually chiselled off). Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery is one of the most important regional museums in the country, with collections ranging from archaeology to an extensive collection of fine art, including a superb sequence of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. There is also an impressive industrial gallery, which exhibits some of the highest quality crafts made in the city during the 19th century, most notably ceramics and stained glass. www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/bmag/about
Nymphaeum, Amman Remains of an ancient Roman Nymphaeum (fountain basin with an ornamental rear wall) can be found at the end of one of the side streets of central Amman.
Nymphaeum, Amman Remains of an ancient Roman Nymphaeum (fountain basin with an ornamental rear wall) can be found at the end of one of the side streets of central Amman.
Nymphaeum, Amman Remains of an ancient Roman Nymphaeum (fountain basin with an ornamental rear wall) can be found at the end of one of the side streets of central Amman.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Odeon, Amman The Odeon sits in Hashemite Square adjacent to the much larger amphitheatre and accessible with the same ticket. Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Odeon, Amman The Odeon sits in Hashemite Square adjacent to the much larger amphitheatre and accessible with the same ticket. Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Odeon, Amman The Odeon sits in Hashemite Square adjacent to the much larger amphitheatre and accessible with the same ticket. Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Floor Piercings, Odeon, Amman The Odeon sits in Hashemite Square adjacent to the much larger amphitheatre and accessible with the same ticket. Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Odeon, Amman The Odeon sits in Hashemite Square adjacent to the much larger amphitheatre and accessible with the same ticket. Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Odeon, Amman The Odeon sits in Hashemite Square adjacent to the much larger amphitheatre and accessible with the same ticket. Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Odeon, Amman The Odeon sits in Hashemite Square adjacent to the much larger amphitheatre and accessible with the same ticket. Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Odeon, Amman The Odeon sits in Hashemite Square adjacent to the much larger amphitheatre and accessible with the same ticket. Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Capital, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Entrance to Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Torso, Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Soldier's Torso, Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Torso, Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Drain Cover, Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Drain Cover, Amman Amphitheatre Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Odeon, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Niche, Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
View from Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Ancient Colonnade, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre.
Colonnade near Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre.
Amphitheatre, Amman Amman's city centre may have a modern feel today but is actually one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the World, with evidence of its classical past (as the ancient city of Philadelphia) still visible in certain areas. The most important remaining monument of the city's classical past is the stunning Roman amphitheatre. The theatre was built the reign of Antonius Pius (138-161 AD) and could seat up to 6,000 people. Built into the hillside, it was oriented north to keep the fierce sun off the spectators.
Classical Relief Fragment, Kerak Fortress Kerak Fortress dominates the surrounding hilltop town of Al Karak and is the largest Crusader castle in Jordan. It dates mainly from the latter half of the 12th century. Although parts of the complex today are ruinous (owing to several sieges throughout its history) enough remains to give a good impression of a working medieval fortress, with many rooms and passages retaining their barrel-vaulted ceilings. For more historical background see below:- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerak_Castle
El Khazneh, The Treasury, Petra Petra's most famous monument is the first one encounters as a visitor (as well as the last seen upon exiting the site), dramatically revealed through the end of the Siq. The Treasury, known locally as El Khazneh, is an unforgettable sight. The façade is spectacular and one of the most perfectly preserved specimens of classical architecture surviving from Antiquity. It is believed to date from the 1st century BC and to have been conceived as a sepulchre for one of the Nabatean kings. Some consider it may have been used as a temple, though, like most of Petra's monuments, it's interior is quite small in relation to the stupendous façade, a mere chamber without decoration (which wasn't accessible to the public when we visited). The Treasury façade is also Petra's best preserved monument, being in a sheltered position, with much of the stonework looking as good as new. Sadly the extensive figurative sculpture has fared less well, having been systematically defaced by Islamic iconoclasts in the 8th century, but the dramatic poses of the dancing figures adorning the upper storey still add a touch of drama.
Capitals, El Khazneh, The Treasury, Petra Petra's most famous monument is the first one encounters as a visitor (as well as the last seen upon exiting the site), dramatically revealed through the end of the Siq. The Treasury, known locally as El Khazneh, is an unforgettable sight. The façade is spectacular and one of the most perfectly preserved specimens of classical architecture surviving from Antiquity. It is believed to date from the 1st century BC and to have been conceived as a sepulchre for one of the Nabatean kings. Some consider it may have been used as a temple, though, like most of Petra's monuments, it's interior is quite small in relation to the stupendous façade, a mere chamber without decoration (which wasn't accessible to the public when we visited). The Treasury façade is also Petra's best preserved monument, being in a sheltered position, with much of the stonework looking as good as new. Sadly the extensive figurative sculpture has fared less well, having been systematically defaced by Islamic iconoclasts in the 8th century, but the dramatic poses of the dancing figures adorning the upper storey still add a touch of drama.
El Khazneh, The Treasury, Petra Petra's most famous monument is the first one encounters as a visitor (as well as the last seen upon exiting the site), dramatically revealed through the end of the Siq. The Treasury, known locally as El Khazneh, is an unforgettable sight. The façade is spectacular and one of the most perfectly preserved specimens of classical architecture surviving from Antiquity. It is believed to date from the 1st century BC and to have been conceived as a sepulchre for one of the Nabatean kings. Some consider it may have been used as a temple, though, like most of Petra's monuments, it's interior is quite small in relation to the stupendous façade, a mere chamber without decoration (which wasn't accessible to the public when we visited). The Treasury façade is also Petra's best preserved monument, being in a sheltered position, with much of the stonework looking as good as new. Sadly the extensive figurative sculpture has fared less well, having been systematically defaced by Islamic iconoclasts in the 8th century, but the dramatic poses of the dancing figures adorning the upper storey still add a touch of drama.
El Khazneh, The Treasury, Petra Petra's most famous monument is the first one encounters as a visitor (as well as the last seen upon exiting the site), dramatically revealed through the end of the Siq. The Treasury, known locally as El Khazneh, is an unforgettable sight. The façade is spectacular and one of the most perfectly preserved specimens of classical architecture surviving from Antiquity. It is believed to date from the 1st century BC and to have been conceived as a sepulchre for one of the Nabatean kings. Some consider it may have been used as a temple, though, like most of Petra's monuments, it's interior is quite small in relation to the stupendous façade, a mere chamber without decoration (which wasn't accessible to the public when we visited). The Treasury façade is also Petra's best preserved monument, being in a sheltered position, with much of the stonework looking as good as new. Sadly the extensive figurative sculpture has fared less well, having been systematically defaced by Islamic iconoclasts in the 8th century, but the dramatic poses of the dancing figures adorning the upper storey still add a touch of drama.
El Khazneh / The Treasury, Petra Petra's most famous monument is the first one encounters as a visitor (as well as the last seen upon exiting the site), dramatically revealed through the end of the Siq. The Treasury, known locally as El Khazneh, is an unforgettable sight. The façade is spectacular and one of the most perfectly preserved specimens of classical architecture surviving from Antiquity. It is believed to date from the 1st century BC and to have been conceived as a sepulchre for one of the Nabatean kings. Some consider it may have been used as a temple, though, like most of Petra's monuments, it's interior is quite small in relation to the stupendous façade, a mere chamber without decoration (which wasn't accessible to the public when we visited). The Treasury façade is also Petra's best preserved monument, being in a sheltered position, with much of the stonework looking as good as new. Sadly the extensive figurative sculpture has fared less well, having been systematically defaced by Islamic iconoclasts in the 8th century, but the dramatic poses of the dancing figures adorning the upper storey still add a touch of drama.
El Khazneh / The Treasury, Petra Petra's most famous monument is the first one encounters as a visitor (as well as the last seen upon exiting the site), dramatically revealed through the end of the Siq. The Treasury, known locally as El Khazneh, is an unforgettable sight. The façade is spectacular and one of the most perfectly preserved specimens of classical architecture surviving from Antiquity. It is believed to date from the 1st century BC and to have been conceived as a sepulchre for one of the Nabatean kings. Some consider it may have been used as a temple, though, like most of Petra's monuments, it's interior is quite small in relation to the stupendous façade, a mere chamber without decoration (which wasn't accessible to the public when we visited). The Treasury façade is also Petra's best preserved monument, being in a sheltered position, with much of the stonework looking as good as new. Sadly the extensive figurative sculpture has fared less well, having been systematically defaced by Islamic iconoclasts in the 8th century, but the dramatic poses of the dancing figures adorning the upper storey still add a touch of drama.
El Khazneh / The Treasury, Petra Petra's most famous monument is the first one encounters as a visitor (as well as the last seen upon exiting the site), dramatically revealed through the end of the Siq. The Treasury, known locally as El Khazneh, is an unforgettable sight. The façade is spectacular and one of the most perfectly preserved specimens of classical architecture surviving from Antiquity. It is believed to date from the 1st century BC and to have been conceived as a sepulchre for one of the Nabatean kings. Some consider it may have been used as a temple, though, like most of Petra's monuments, it's interior is quite small in relation to the stupendous façade, a mere chamber without decoration (which wasn't accessible to the public when we visited). The Treasury façade is also Petra's best preserved monument, being in a sheltered position, with much of the stonework looking as good as new. Sadly the extensive figurative sculpture has fared less well, having been systematically defaced by Islamic iconoclasts in the 8th century, but the dramatic poses of the dancing figures adorning the upper storey still add a touch of drama.
Petra Some of the many tomb facades that can be seen all over Petra, probably dating from the 1st century BC. These combine architectural characteristics unique to Nabatean Petra, with classical facades surmounted by step-like motifs, distinctly more eastern forms.
The Urn Tomb, Petra The east cliff contains a sequence of some of the most important tomb facades in Petra, including the Palace Tomb, the Corinthian Tomb, and the Urn Tomb. Some of the many tomb facades that can be seen all over Petra, probably dating from the 1st century BC. These combine architectural characteristics unique to Nabatean Petra, with classical facades surmounted by step-like motifs, distinctly more eastern forms.
The Urn Tomb, Petra The east cliff contains a sequence of some of the most important tomb facades in Petra, including the Palace Tomb, the Corinthian Tomb, and the Urn Tomb. Some of the many tomb facades that can be seen all over Petra, probably dating from the 1st century BC. These combine architectural characteristics unique to Nabatean Petra, with classical facades surmounted by step-like motifs, distinctly more eastern forms.
The Urn Tomb, Petra The east cliff contains a sequence of some of the most important tomb facades in Petra, including the Palace Tomb, the Corinthian Tomb, and the Urn Tomb. Some of the many tomb facades that can be seen all over Petra, probably dating from the 1st century BC. These combine architectural characteristics unique to Nabatean Petra, with classical facades surmounted by step-like motifs, distinctly more eastern forms.
The Urn Tomb, Petra The east cliff contains a sequence of some of the most important tomb facades in Petra, including the Palace Tomb, the Corinthian Tomb, and the Urn Tomb. Some of the many tomb facades that can be seen all over Petra, probably dating from the 1st century BC. These combine architectural characteristics unique to Nabatean Petra, with classical facades surmounted by step-like motifs, distinctly more eastern forms.
The Urn Tomb, Petra The east cliff contains a sequence of some of the most important tomb facades in Petra, including the Palace Tomb, the Corinthian Tomb, and the Urn Tomb. Some of the many tomb facades that can be seen all over Petra, probably dating from the 1st century BC. These combine architectural characteristics unique to Nabatean Petra, with classical facades surmounted by step-like motifs, distinctly more eastern forms.
Inside The Urn Tomb, Petra The east cliff contains a sequence of some of the most important tomb facades in Petra, including the Palace Tomb, the Corinthian Tomb, and the Urn Tomb. Some of the many tomb facades that can be seen all over Petra, probably dating from the 1st century BC. These combine architectural characteristics unique to Nabatean Petra, with classical facades surmounted by step-like motifs, distinctly more eastern forms.

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