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NYC - East Village: Vamos Sembrar Garden Vamos Sembrar Garden is a small community garden on Avenue B between East 13th Street and East 12th Street.
NYC - East Village: 200 Avenue B Association Garden 200 Avenue B Association is a small community garden on Avenue B between East 13th Street and East 12th Street.
NYC - East Village: Roberto Clemente Center - mural The mural outside the Roberto Clemente Center was painted in 1996 by local artist Antonio Garcia, known simply as Chico. The mural represents the mixing of Latin American cultures, races, and identities up to the current Period of immigration to North America. The mural is done on two levels. The lower levels depcicts symbols of the evolution of cultures. On the left (off camera) it represents Native Americans followed by the arrival of the Spanish. The mixing of those two races resulted in the evolution of the peasant, Jibarao (depicted with hat and machete). The Jibaro's culture is represented by string musical instruments. Similarly, the African influence in Latin nationality is represented by the drums. These cultures and races mixed and resulted in the racially mixed "trigueno" nation. Following that is the representation of immigration to the U.S. in search of economic and other freedomds--Statue of Liberty. The top lefvel of the mural depicts eight outsanding symbols of a racially integrated Lain American pride: men and women; "triguenos," black and white; Dominican, Puerto Rican, Mexican, Venezuelan, Cuban, Salvadorean--all representatives of the honor of being South and Central American, Mexican and Carribean. From left to right are (not pictured): Dominican Indian Leader Anacona; Mexican Constitutional Reformer Benito Juarez, Liberator of South America Simon Bolivar, Puerto Rican feminist Luisa Capetillo, and (pictured) Puerto Rican liberation leader Ramon E. Betances, Cuban independence leader Jose Marti, Puerto Rican poet Julia de Burgos, Salvadorean leader of the rights of the poor Archbishop Romero. To the extreme right, on the other side of the door, is the namesake, baseball Hall of Famer, Roberto Clemente. The Roberto Clemente Center was first established in 1982 as an outpatient mental health service: It was the first mental health program in New York State to propose that culture is an essential component of mental health treatment. Cultural sensitivity was operationalized by including an all bilingual and bicultural staff. The importance of culturally sensitive care is now well established in the mental health field. The Clemente Center broke ground in making this possible for other mental health groups. The Roberto Clemente Center was made possible by the advocacy efforts of the Minority Advisory Council of the New York State Office of Mental Health and especially by the energetic support received from community-based organizations and leaders. The Center was first funded by the New York State Office of Mental Health. The Center was named after Roberto Clemente in order to honor the values and work of the late Pittsburgh Pirates baseball star. Clemente spoke out about the discrimination that African-American and Latino players suffered in baseball. Throughout his life, Roberto Clemente strove for the highest performance goals and expectations. His love for children led him to develop children's sports programs. Clemente is also known for his humanitarian and relief efforts. Roberto Clemente died in a tragic plane crash on New Year's Eve of 1972 while transporting medical relief for the victims of an earthquake in Nicaragua. The neighorhood is filled with Chico's renegade work which dates back to the early 80's when he used to tag old redbird subway cars. He is often credited with transforming subway graffiti into a more accepted art form. His first mural — long gone — was a jab at then President Reagan: a tank driving toward the words "World War III." Then local businesses offered to pay him $100, then more, to paint walls near their stores creating an eclectic range of art.
NYC - East Village: Roberto Clemente Center - mural The mural outside the Roberto Clemente Center was painted in 1996 by local artist Antonio Garcia, known simply as Chico. The mural represents the mixing of Latin American cultures, races, and identities up to the current Period of immigration to North America. The mural is done on two levels. The lower levels depcicts symbols of the evolution of cultures. On the left (off camera) it represents Native Americans followed by the arrival of the Spanish. The mixing of those two races resulted in the evolution of the peasant, Jibarao (depicted with hat and machete). The Jibaro's culture is represented by string musical instruments. Similarly, the African influence in Latin nationality is represented by the drums. These cultures and races mixed and resulted in the racially mixed "trigueno" nation. Following that is the representation of immigration to the U.S. in search of economic and other freedomds--Statue of Liberty. The top lefvel of the mural depicts eight outsanding symbols of a racially integrated Lain American pride: men and women; "triguenos," black and white; Dominican, Puerto Rican, Mexican, Venezuelan, Cuban, Salvadorean--all representatives of the honor of being South and Central American, Mexican and Carribean. From left to right are: Dominican Indian Leader Anacona; Mexican Constitutional Reformer Benito Juarez, Liberator of South America Simon Bolivar, Puerto Rican feminist Luisa Capetillo, and Puerto Rican liberation leader Ramon E. Betances, Cuban independence leader Jose Marti, Puerto Rican poet Julia de Burgos, Salvadorean leader of the rights of the poor Archbishop Romero. To the extreme right, on the other side of the door, is the namesake, baseball Hall of Famer, Roberto Clemente. The Roberto Clemente Center was first established in 1982 as an outpatient mental health service: It was the first mental health program in New York State to propose that culture is an essential component of mental health treatment. Cultural sensitivity was operationalized by including an all bilingual and bicultural staff. The importance of culturally sensitive care is now well established in the mental health field. The Clemente Center broke ground in making this possible for other mental health groups. The Roberto Clemente Center was made possible by the advocacy efforts of the Minority Advisory Council of the New York State Office of Mental Health and especially by the energetic support received from community-based organizations and leaders. The Center was first funded by the New York State Office of Mental Health. The Center was named after Roberto Clemente in order to honor the values and work of the late Pittsburgh Pirates baseball star. Clemente spoke out about the discrimination that African-American and Latino players suffered in baseball. Throughout his life, Roberto Clemente strove for the highest performance goals and expectations. His love for children led him to develop children's sports programs. Clemente is also known for his humanitarian and relief efforts. Roberto Clemente died in a tragic plane crash on New Year's Eve of 1972 while transporting medical relief for the victims of an earthquake in Nicaragua. The neighorhood is filled with Chico's renegade work which dates back to the early 80's when he used to tag old redbird subway cars. He is often credited with transforming subway graffiti into a more accepted art form. His first mural — long gone — was a jab at then President Reagan: a tank driving toward the words "World War III." Then local businesses offered to pay him $100, then more, to paint walls near their stores creating an eclectic range of art.
NYC - East Village: Dias Y Flores Garden Dias y Flores, a deep lot with extensive garden plots and secluded patios on the south side of East 13th Street between Avenue A and Avenue B, is part of the East Village Parks Conservancy. In 1978, the 13th Street Block Association envisioned a community lot, with a garden and a playground, and began the labor-intensive work of clearing out the brick, rubble, and trash -- from broken hypodermic needles to refrigerators and car parts -- all by hand. Dias y Flores from its earliest days was graced with experienced gardeners and horticulturalists as members, and along with the help of Operation Greenthumb, most of the trees and shrubs that are here today were planted by 1981.
NYC - East Village: Karl Bitter Studio 249½ East 13th Street was formerly Karl Bitter Studio. Bitter was the sculptor of the figures, Architecture, Sculpture, Painting, and Music on the Metropolitan Museum's entrance, and the figure Pamona atop the Plaza'a Pulitzer Fountain. His and his partner's names are carved in stone above the entrance: BITTER & MORETTI SCULPTORS
NYC - East Village: Taxi Driver apartment This apartment, at 226 East 13th Street, is the site of the bloody carnage, when "God's lonely man", Travis Bickle (Robert DeNiro), wipes out the lowlifes in his quest to rescue the young hooker, Iris (Jodi Foster) in Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver.
NYC - East Village: Stuyvesant's Pear Tree plaque On this corner grew Petrus Stuyvesant's pear tree. Recalled to Hollan in 1664 on his return he brought the pear tree and planted it as his memorial "by which" said he "my name may be remembered." The pear tree flourished and bore fruit for over two hundred years. This tablet is placed here by The Holland Society of New York, September 1890. After being recalled to Holland in 1664 when he lost New Amsterdam to the British, unpopular Governor Peter Stuyvesant returned to the newly named New york in 1667. He came with a flowering pear tree, which he planted on the northeast corner of Third Avenue and East 13th Street--then part of his sprawling 62-acre Great Bouwerie estate. The tree, once considered, according to Harper's Monthly Magazine in 1862, as “the oldest living thing in the city of New York" was weakened by a massive winter storm in February 1867. Shortly there after it it succumbed at the hands of a collission by two drays (low flat carts without sides, used for heavy loads by brewers). After two hundred years of flowering, the tree was taken down and a cross-section of the trunk was given to The New-York Historical Society, where it is enclosed in a glass case on the fourth floor. In 2005, 46 years after the plaque commemorating the site of Peter Stuyvesant’s befallen pear tree was repositioned on the northeast corner of Third Ave. and E. 10th St., it was moved back to its home on 3rd Avenue and East 13th Street when William Van Winkle, president of the Holland Society, Charles “Duke” Schlesinger, president of Bendiner & Schlesinger — the medical laboratory at 47-53 Third Ave./101 E. 10th St. — and current plaque owner, has agreed to relinquish the historic 115-year-old bronze tablet. Van Winkle will give it to Philip Clough, president of Kiehl’s Pharmacy. Kiehl’s had been trying for decades to get back the plaque, which had been affixed to its corner wall for 68 years beginning in 1890. In 1890, the Holland Society set out to preserve the memory of early Dutch presence by marking landmarks and sites from early New York City. One of the eight earmarked sites was the corner where Stuyvesant’s pear tree reigned. The original corner pharmacy, known as “The Pear Tree Drugstore,” became Kiehl’s in 1851. The plaque hung on the wall until 1958, when Kiehl’s moved one building farther north. The Holland Society removed the plaque and gave it to St. Mark’s Church in the Bouwerie, site of Stuyvesant’s original chapel and his family’s vault, for safekeeping. In 1959, the church gave the plan to Bendiner & Schlesinger, a medical lab on Third Avenue and East 10th Street. Years of legal battles between Bendinger & Schlesinger and Kiehls finally ended in 2005 after Kiehl's expanded back into the northeast corner in August 2003 and hosted a grand pear tree planting ceremony and rededication of “Pear Tree Corner.” An accord was reached and the plaque was returned to its rightful position.
NYC - East Village: Ladder Company 3 - 9-11 Dedications Dedicated to the Memory of Battalion Chief John P. Williamson, Bat. 6, who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001 Dedicated to the Memory of Firefighter Joseph E. Maloney, Ladder Co. 3, who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001 Dedicated to the Memory of Firefighter Steven J. Olson, Ladder Co. 3, who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001
NYC - East Village: Ladder Company 3 - 9-11 Dedications Dedicated to the Memory of Captain Patrick J. Brown, Ladder Co. 3, who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001 Dedicated to the Memory of Firefighter Michael T. Carroll, Ladder Co. 3, who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001 Dedicated to the Memory of Firefighter Gerard P. Dewan, Ladder Co. 3, who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001
NYC - East Village - Ladder Company 3 - Tribute to the Heroes
NYC - East Village - Ladder Company 3 - 9-11 Dedications Dedicated to the Memory of Firefighter John K. McAvoy, Ladder Co. 3, who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001 Dedicated to the Memory of Firefighter Jeffrey J. Giordano, Ladder Co. 3, who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001 Dedicated to the Memory of Firefighter James R. Coyle, Ladder Co. 3, who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001
NYC - East Village: Grace Church Complex National Historic Register #74001270 (1974)
NYC - Hudson Square: General José Artigas statue The statue of the Uruguayan independence leader and national hero, General José Artigas (1764-1850), is one of a pantheon of six sculptures to Latin American leaders which overlook the Avenue of the Americas. They include Juan Pablo Duarte, considered the Father of the Dominican Republic, at Canal Street, and Brazilian independence leader José Bonidacio de Andrada e Silva in Bryant Park. Located on the Avenue at Central Park South are statues of the Cuban patriot, journalist, and poet, José Martí, Argentine General José de San Martín , and South American liberator Simón Bolívar. José Artigas was born on June 19, 1764 on the outskirts of Montevideo, then part of the Banda Oriental del Uruguay, in the Spanish Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata. Artigas' parents were criollos, and his family were landowners; it was on their estates that at a young age he earned the respect and admiration of the gauchos for his courage and strong character. In 1797 he became military commander of the Cuerpo de Blandengues, a Spanish force charged with ridding the country of outlaws and smugglers. During the British invasions in 1805 and 1807, Artigas distinguished himself in the unsuccessful defense of the region. During the revolt of 1810, Artigas joined the patriotic Junta which attempted to liberate Montevideo from Spanish dominion. A new epoch began in 1811 when Artigas inspired thousands to withdraw in a mass exodus from their homeland to the west bank of the Uruguay River. The exodus gave Artigas the stature of a leader and he guided the revolutionaries in a ten-year crusade to liberate the people from Imperial Spanish rule. The first major revolutionary victory took place on May 18, 1811 in the Battle of Las Piedras, and Artigas was subsequently named “Chief of the Orientales.” Influenced by the principles of American leaders George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, Artigas established a provisional government in 1815 known as the Federal League. However, resurgent Portuguese forces brought about the demise of this democratic experiment. Artigas was forced to live in exile in Paraguay from 1820 until he died on September 23, 1850. The movement which Artigas inspired was eventually victorious; the First Republic of Uruguay was established on August 25, 1825. The larger-than-life statue of Artigas in Soho Square is a second cast of an original by José Luis Zorrilla de San Martín (1891-1975), which has stood in Montevideo, in front of the Uruguayan National Bank, since 1949. Zorrilla served as Director of the Uruguayan National Museum of Fine Arts, and was then considered his country’s outstanding sculptor. His father, Juan Zorrilla de San Martín, was both a poet and Uruguay’s Ambassador to Spain. This replica was fabricated by Vignali and Company, and placed on a Uruguayan granite base designed by architect Maria Cristina Caquías. Soho Square, in which the statue stands was one of several wedge-shaped public plazas created when Sixth Avenue was extended south of Carmine Street in the 1920s. The street was renamed Avenue of the Americas in 1945 at the suggestion of Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia, to honor Pan-American ideals and principles.
NYC - SoHo - Broome Street Bar Established in 1972 in what was then known as the "cast-iron district," the Broome Street Bar provides comforting tradition within the constant flux of SoHo. This restaurant/bar has a history, and wears it proudly.
NYC - SoHo - Manhattan Portage There was a simple philosophy that Manhattan Portage set out to achieve back in 1980, "A Bag For Everyone." Twenty years later it is certainly ringing true. From Montreal to Melbourne, Osaka to Oslo, and Stockholm to San Francisco, Manhattan Portage's line of bags are indeed everywhere and carried by everyone. Despite their sweeping global popularity, Manhattan Portage remains loyal to their NYC roots. This 26-year lifespan in the volatile fashion world, and in a town that embraces the designer-of-the-moment but does not suffer has-beens, is no small feat. Manhattan Portage has been able to avoid becoming another fleeting fad and withstand the test of time because their bags do. By innovating and expanding their line to accommodate the range of uses their bag owners demand, the Manhattan Portage line has developed to serve all walks and runs of urban life. Whether you are a DJ transporting your spinning equipment, a cell phone-toting investment banker, a starving student hauling pricey textbooks, or a messenger racing to deliver documents on time, Manhattan Portage has a style for you. (Even if, like many New Yorkers, you fit into two or more of these categories!)
NYC - SoHo: Streetart by Judith Supine
NYC - SoHo: Streetart by Judith Supine
NYC - SoHo: SICIS Beyond the giant windows of this expansive three-floor Soho flagship, a white gallery space is transformed several times a year by a new exhibition of Sicis' mosaic art. Staff is on hand to help you piece together how the company's 5,000 varieties of glass, steel, marble and even gold tiles can work best for your space.
NYC - SoHo: OK Harris - Muriel Castanis sculpture OK Harris was founded by Ivan C. Karp in 1969 in the SoHo district of Manhattan. After having been co-director of Leo Castelli Gallery from 1959-1969 during which time he was instrumental in launching the careers of pop artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Tom Wesselmann and John Chamberlain, Ivan broke away and decided to launch his own gallery. Its establishment in SoHo as the first gallery on West Broadway helped inspire the development of the area’s fine arts character. In addition to being at the forefront of the Photo Realist movement in 1969, OK Harris was among the first galleries to exhibit the work of Duane Hanson, Deborah Butterfield, Manny Farber, Richard Pettibone, Robert Cottingham, Robert Bechtle, Marilyn Levine, Nancy Rubins, Malcolm Morley, Luis Jiminez, Jake Berthot, Jack Goldstein, Porfirio DiDonna, Al Souza and Arman. OK Harris exhibits contemporary art and photography, and on occasion mounts shows of antiques and collectibles. In it’s capacious facility, it is able to mount five, one - person shows simultaneously and has seven such exhibitions in the course of a year. The gallery maintains a complete photographic archive on its exhibitions from the time of its inception, available to students and scholars for research, without reservation. Muriel Brunner Castanis was an American sculptor best known for her public art installments involving fluidly draped figures. Though she attended New York’s High School of Music and Art, she did not begin her art career until she'd spent 10 years as a wife and mother. Her 1980 exhibit at OK Harris Works of Art in Manhattan led to her breakthrough. Castanis died of lung failure in Greenwich Village.
NYC - SoHo: OK Harris - Muriel Castanis sculpture OK Harris was founded by Ivan C. Karp in 1969 in the SoHo district of Manhattan. After having been co-director of Leo Castelli Gallery from 1959-1969 during which time he was instrumental in launching the careers of pop artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Tom Wesselmann and John Chamberlain, Ivan broke away and decided to launch his own gallery. Its establishment in SoHo as the first gallery on West Broadway helped inspire the development of the area’s fine arts character. In addition to being at the forefront of the Photo Realist movement in 1969, OK Harris was among the first galleries to exhibit the work of Duane Hanson, Deborah Butterfield, Manny Farber, Richard Pettibone, Robert Cottingham, Robert Bechtle, Marilyn Levine, Nancy Rubins, Malcolm Morley, Luis Jiminez, Jake Berthot, Jack Goldstein, Porfirio DiDonna, Al Souza and Arman. OK Harris exhibits contemporary art and photography, and on occasion mounts shows of antiques and collectibles. In it’s capacious facility, it is able to mount five, one - person shows simultaneously and has seven such exhibitions in the course of a year. The gallery maintains a complete photographic archive on its exhibitions from the time of its inception, available to students and scholars for research, without reservation. Muriel Brunner Castanis was an American sculptor best known for her public art installments involving fluidly draped figures. Though she attended New York’s High School of Music and Art, she did not begin her art career until she'd spent 10 years as a wife and mother. Her 1980 exhibit at OK Harris Works of Art in Manhattan led to her breakthrough. Castanis died of lung failure in Greenwich Village.
NYC - SoHo: OK Harris - Muriel Castanis sculpture OK Harris was founded by Ivan C. Karp in 1969 in the SoHo district of Manhattan. After having been co-director of Leo Castelli Gallery from 1959-1969 during which time he was instrumental in launching the careers of pop artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Tom Wesselmann and John Chamberlain, Ivan broke away and decided to launch his own gallery. Its establishment in SoHo as the first gallery on West Broadway helped inspire the development of the area’s fine arts character. In addition to being at the forefront of the Photo Realist movement in 1969, OK Harris was among the first galleries to exhibit the work of Duane Hanson, Deborah Butterfield, Manny Farber, Richard Pettibone, Robert Cottingham, Robert Bechtle, Marilyn Levine, Nancy Rubins, Malcolm Morley, Luis Jiminez, Jake Berthot, Jack Goldstein, Porfirio DiDonna, Al Souza and Arman. OK Harris exhibits contemporary art and photography, and on occasion mounts shows of antiques and collectibles. In it’s capacious facility, it is able to mount five, one - person shows simultaneously and has seven such exhibitions in the course of a year. The gallery maintains a complete photographic archive on its exhibitions from the time of its inception, available to students and scholars for research, without reservation. Muriel Brunner Castanis was an American sculptor best known for her public art installments involving fluidly draped figures. Though she attended New York’s High School of Music and Art, she did not begin her art career until she'd spent 10 years as a wife and mother. Her 1980 exhibit at OK Harris Works of Art in Manhattan led to her breakthrough. Castanis died of lung failure in Greenwich Village.
NYC - SoHo: adidas Originals Store North America's first adidas Originals store opened in August 2002 in SoHo. It was the third such store in the world, with the first two opening in Berlin and Tokyo in 2001. Designed by eoos, the Originals store brand is based off the company's classic design history from the 1950's to 1970's--starkly contrasting the multi-floor, 29,500 square foot Adidas Sport Performance Store located just a few blocks away. The layout is reminiscent of a street market, with large, low tables exhibiting the goods as if spread out on blankets, and large crystalline boxes hold the rest of the goods like baskets. Just like a market, the display is arranged in several continuous rows. Three-striped, rubber track flooring guides customers through the center of the shop to the shoe wall. Each shoe fixture mounts to Adidas' signature tri-post system, which subtly reinforces the striped branding while acting as the shops' modular merchandising system and primary structural element. There is no front façade, just a piece of transparent 'fencing' consisting of glass with bumps that form the classic 'trefoil' (clover leaf) from a distance. The temporariness of the 'originals store' allows it to be used for purposes that are not normally possible. The elements can be temporarily stacked in part of the store, the large table units become seating areas for a 'chill out', and the cash desks are transformed into DJ desks or bars: the store becomes a club. Founded by Adolph Dassler in Herzogenaurach in Southern Germany in 1924, adidas is the second largest sportswear manufacturer in the world. In January 2006, they bought out rival Reebok for $3.8 billion, allowing it to compete with Nike worldwide.
NYC - NoLita: Old St. Patrick's Cathedral The corner stone of Old St. Patrick’s, the city’s first Cathedral Church and oldest Roman Catholic church, was laid on June 8,1809 and the church was dedicated on May 14,1815. Dedicated to the patron saint of Ireland, St. Patrick's ceased to be the seat of the Archdiocese of New York after the completion of the present St. Patrick's Cathedral and became a parish church on May 25,1879. Over the years, the church served the Irish, German, French and Italian immigrant communities. Today’s parish is comprised of primarily Italian-Americans, Dominican-Americans and the surrounding area’s younger artists and professionals. Designed by architect Joseph Francois Mangin, the architect of City Hall, in a Gothic-inspired style, it was buult of local stone. St. Patrick’s sidewalls rise to a height of 75 feet, and the inner vault is 85 feet high. The church is over 120 feet long and 80 feet wide. Near the west wall stands the huge marble altar surrounded by an ornately carved, gold leaf reredos. The cathedral underwent extensive restoration following a disastrous fire in 1866. The original, historic organ, an Erben 3-41, built by by Henry Erben in 1852 still sits in the choir loft. Beneath the church lies a labyrinth of well-kept mortuary vaults and outside, is a cemetery containing many old graves and tombstones. Most famous of all was the original resting place of Pierre Toussaint, a Black New Yorker, born a slave in Haiti, whose cause for canonization (sainthood) is being considered in Rome. St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral was declared a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Commission in 1966. Old St. Patrick's Cathedral Complex, inclduing St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral School and St. Michael’s, National Register #77000964
NYC - NoLita: Old St. Patrick's Cathedral The corner stone of Old St. Patrick’s, the city’s first Cathedral Church and oldest Roman Catholic church, was laid on June 8,1809 and the church was dedicated on May 14,1815. Dedicated to the patron saint of Ireland, St. Patrick's ceased to be the seat of the Archdiocese of New York after the completion of the present St. Patrick's Cathedral and became a parish church on May 25,1879. Over the years, the church served the Irish, German, French and Italian immigrant communities. Today’s parish is comprised of primarily Italian-Americans, Dominican-Americans and the surrounding area’s younger artists and professionals. Designed by architect Joseph Francois Mangin, the architect of City Hall, in a Gothic-inspired style, it was buult of local stone. St. Patrick’s sidewalls rise to a height of 75 feet, and the inner vault is 85 feet high. The church is over 120 feet long and 80 feet wide. Near the west wall stands the huge marble altar surrounded by an ornately carved, gold leaf reredos. The cathedral underwent extensive restoration following a disastrous fire in 1866. The original, historic organ, an Erben 3-41, built by by Henry Erben in 1852 still sits in the choir loft. Beneath the church lies a labyrinth of well-kept mortuary vaults and outside, is a cemetery containing many old graves and tombstones. Most famous of all was the original resting place of Pierre Toussaint, a Black New Yorker, born a slave in Haiti, whose cause for canonization (sainthood) is being considered in Rome. St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral was declared a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Commission in 1966. Old St. Patrick's Cathedral Complex, including St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral School and St. Michael’s, National Register #77000964
NYC - SoHo: Saint Michael's Russian Catholic Church St. Michael's Russian Catholic Chapel opened its doors in 1936 to serve the needs of the emigre Russian Catholics who had made their way to the New York, under the leadership of Fr. Andrew Rogosh. The end of World War II sparked a new wave of immigration, and Rogosh's parish helped ease the transition of the new arrivals. A third wave of immigration in the 1970's also found comfort in the church. The chapel made its home in a building built by James Renwick Jr. with William Rodrigue from 1858-59. The small Gothic Revival building was designed to harmonize with the nearby St. Patrick's Cathedral. It originally served as Saint Patrick's Chancery Office. Saint Michael's Russian Catholic Chapel, formerly Saint Michael's Chapel, and before that Saint Patrick's Chancery Office, was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1977. Old St. Patrick's Cathedral Complex, including St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral School and St. Michael’s, National Register #77000964
NYC - NoLita: Old St. Patrick's Cathedral The corner stone of Old St. Patrick’s, the city’s first Cathedral Church and oldest Roman Catholic church, was laid on June 8,1809 and the church was dedicated on May 14,1815. Dedicated to the patron saint of Ireland, St. Patrick's ceased to be the seat of the Archdiocese of New York after the completion of the present St. Patrick's Cathedral and became a parish church on May 25,1879. Over the years, the church served the Irish, German, French and Italian immigrant communities. Today’s parish is comprised of primarily Italian-Americans, Dominican-Americans and the surrounding area’s younger artists and professionals. Designed by architect Joseph Francois Mangin, the architect of City Hall, in a Gothic-inspired style, it was buult of local stone. St. Patrick’s sidewalls rise to a height of 75 feet, and the inner vault is 85 feet high. The church is over 120 feet long and 80 feet wide. Near the west wall stands the huge marble altar surrounded by an ornately carved, gold leaf reredos. The cathedral underwent extensive restoration following a disastrous fire in 1866. The original, historic organ, an Erben 3-41, built by by Henry Erben in 1852 still sits in the choir loft. Beneath the church lies a labyrinth of well-kept mortuary vaults and outside, is a cemetery containing many old graves and tombstones. Most famous of all was the original resting place of Pierre Toussaint, a Black New Yorker, born a slave in Haiti, whose cause for canonization (sainthood) is being considered in Rome. St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral was declared a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Commission in 1966. Old St. Patrick's Cathedral Complex, inclduing St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral School and St. Michael’s, National Register #77000964
NYC - SoHo: Saint Michael's Russian Catholic Church St. Michael's Russian Catholic Chapel opened its doors in 1936 to serve the needs of the emigre Russian Catholics who had made their way to the New York, under the leadership of Fr. Andrew Rogosh. The end of World War II sparked a new wave of immigration, and Rogosh's parish helped ease the transition of the new arrivals. A third wave of immigration in the 1970's also found comfort in the church. The chapel made its home in a building built by James Renwick Jr. with William Rodrigue from 1858-59. The small Gothic Revival building was designed to harmonize with the nearby St. Patrick's Cathedral. It originally served as Saint Patrick's Chancery Office. Saint Michael's Russian Catholic Chapel, formerly Saint Michael's Chapel, and before that Saint Patrick's Chancery Office, was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1977. Old St. Patrick's Cathedral Complex, including St. Patricks Old Cathedral School and St. Michaels, National Register #77000964
NYC - SoHo - Madonna H&M billboard H&M, the international retail giant and their head of design Margareta van den Bosch teamed up with Madonna to create a line of clothing and accessories that are scheduled to arrive in all stores carrying the women’s wear collection, around the world in March 2007. The 'M by Madonna' fashion line reflected Madonna's timeless, unique and always glamorous style. A long standing cultural icon whose enormous global influence on how people dress and look is without equal, Madonna worked hand in hand with Margareta van den Bosch to create a wardrobe of clothing and accessories that represent her own personal and modern spin on her very own wardrobe staples. Madonna, the multi-Grammy winning singer, video visionary, children’s book author, human rights activist and cultural phenomenon joined with H&M, founded in Sweden in l947 and now possessing over 1,300 stores in 24 countries.
NYC - Subway
NYC - SoHo: Prince Street Station Opened on April 14, 1918, the Prince Street station, on the BMT Broadway line, services the N, R and W trains. A renovation in 2001 restored the original name tablet mosaics and tile band. Prince Street was named by the British and was one of the few streets not to be renamed after the Revolution. The platform walls are adorned with the 2004 artwork, Carrying On, by Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario. The water jet-cut steel, marbele, and slate frieze running a total of 1,200 feet is composed of 194 silhouettes of people hauling "stuff" with them as they walk the city streets and subways.
NYC - SoHo: 20 Greene Street 20 Greene Street, part of the longest continuous row (10 to be exact) of iron-front buildings anywhere, was built in 1880 by Samuel Warner. In 1993 it was converted into commercial condos, and offers a first floor rental space for performances and exhibitions. The 45,000 square-foot landmark cast-iron building located between Grand and Canal streets quickly sold out 10 JLWQA lofts and two commercial lofts. SoHo Cast-Iron District National Historic Register #78001883
Boston - Boston University: Warren Alpert Mall Warren Alpert Mall, also known as the "BU beach", behind Marsh Chapel, is the largest plot of green space on campus, having replaced a parking lot in 1970. It is named for Warren Alpert (1920- ), a trustee of the University, 1942 graduate of the College of Arts and Sciences, New York investment banker, and a native of Chelsea, Mass. Alpert, who had blue collar roots and worked seven days a week as a BU student, in 1988 pledged $100,000 to BU to help reform the Chelsea school system. It is a popular place for students to gather during warm weather and gets its alternate name from the wave-like sounds produced by cars passing on nearby Storrow Drive.
Boston - Boston University: Warren Alpert Mall Warren Alpert Mall, also known as the "BU beach", behind Marsh Chapel, is the largest plot of green space on campus, having replaced a parking lot in 1970. It is named for Warren Alpert (1920- ), a trustee of the University, 1942 graduate of the College of Arts and Sciences, New York investment banker, and a native of Chelsea, Mass. Alpert, who had blue collar roots and worked seven days a week as a BU student, in 1988 pledged $100,000 to BU to help reform the Chelsea school system. It is a popular place for students to gather during warm weather and gets its alternate name from the wave-like sounds produced by cars passing on nearby Storrow Drive.
Boston - Boston University - Behind the George Sherman Union
Boston - Boston University - George Sherman Union - Moo Bella machine The MooBella Ice Cream System produces a wide variety of creamy, delicious, hard-packed ice cream flavors made fresh to order in approximately 45 seconds. Consumers select the type of ice cream (currently premium or light, but soy and yogurt are coming soon), flavor (with 12 to choose from) and a mix-in (such as chocolate chips, M&M’s, walnuts, and cookies & creme) of their choice and the machine produces a 4.5 ounce scoop of mouth-watering ice cream. It tastes just so so.
Boston - Boston University - Marsh Plaza - Free at Last Marsh Plaza was dedicated in 1949, the culmination of the vision and persistence of Methodist minister, Daniel L. Marsh (School of Theology 1908), the fourth president of Boston University (1926-1950). On May 16, 1975, Free at Last, the soaring sculpture by Sergio Castillo was unveiled in memory of one of BU's greatest's alumni, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (GRS '55, Hon. '59) nearly a decade before federal legislation created Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The fifty doves flying in formation represent peace in all fifty states. The sculpture’s granite base is engraved with some of King’s famous quotations on peace and equality. Campus legend says when a virgin student graduates, all the birds will fly away.
Boston: Boston University - Marsh Plaza - Free at Last Marsh Plaza was dedicated in 1949, the culmination of the vision and persistence of Methodist minister, Daniel L. Marsh (School of Theology 1908), the fourth president of Boston University (1926-1950). On May 16, 1975, Free at Last, the soaring sculpture by Sergio Castillo was unveiled in memory of one of BU's greatest's alumni, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (GRS '55, Hon. '59) nearly a decade before federal legislation created Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The fifty doves flying in formation represent peace in all fifty states. The sculpture’s granite base is engraved with some of King’s famous quotations on peace and equality. Campus legend says when a virgin student graduates, all the birds will fly away. Marsh Chapel, built between 1939 and 1948 and dedicated in 1950, sits at the heart of the Boston University campus and serves the campus in two distinct ways--housing the Office of the University Chaplain and the center for the Interdenominational Christian Ministries on campus. The inscription welcoming visitors to the chapel does not mention Jesus, and no cross was included in the sanctuary's ornamentation. The foundation of the chapel contains stones from Jesus College and St. John's College, both at England's Oxford University. The Chapel, symbolizing a unifying force (and geographical center) among all the diverse elements forming the University is joined on one side to the College of Arts and Scienes, and on the other to the School of Theology. Modeled after the "Old Stump", the cathedral of Boston England, a vision which was never realized. The great windows in the Nave, designed by the famed Connick Associates of Boston in 1916, were moved from the old theology building on Beacon Hill when Marsh Chapel was erected . Starting from the balcony and going counterclockwise, the four persons depicted from Hebrew scriptures are: Abraham, Moses, Elijah and Isaiah. In each case there is a medallion at the bottom of each window, which pictures an important scene in the life of each. On the east side of the church are four figures from the New Testament: John the Baptist, Peter, Paul and John. On the west side are four leaders of the early church, Athanasius, Augustine, St. Francis of Assissi and Martin Luther. The Methodist heritage of the school is represented by John Wesley and Francis Asbury. Two 19th century leaders are found pictured in the last window: Abraham Lincoln and Frances Willard, who was the dean at Northwestern University and one of the early and great leaders of the women's movement. The smaller windows have themes: On the east, great doors which have been important in the history of the Church are depicted. They are both ecumenical and interfaith. On the west are depicted towers which are part of our heritage. One of them, Christ Church College at Oxford, was the place the young Wesley was trained, and a stone from another Oxford college is part of the cornerstone of our Chapel. The statues in the reredos (the carved wooden screen) in front of the church were created by Arcangelo Casieri. The four Gospel writers flank a statue of our Lord. The heads of Bach and Handel are carved into the newel posts at the entrance to the pulpit and lectern. The round rose window over the altar is framed by the pipes of the rebuilt Cassavant organ.
Boston - Boston University - Cornerstone Below the Charles Hayden Memorial cornerstone sits a stone step from 525 Boylston Street, the first location of Boston University's College of Business Administration, and a stone from Milford, the home town of Lee Claflin, a founder of Boston University. The "Charles Hayden Memorial Building, at 685 Commonwealth Ave., is named for Charles Hayden (1870-1937), an MIT graduate who founded the investment banking firm Hayden, Stone & Company. When Hayden died, he left a reported $50 million to a foundation in his name to educate young men. The foundation gave BU $586,000 to build a new College of Business Administration building in 1938. The building was constructed after old College of Business Administration at 525 Boylston was razed in the early part of the decade. That building, formerly part of MIT until they moved to Cambridge played a key role in Boston University's move to the Charles River Campus. The six-story limestone collegiate Gothic structure, featuring arched doorways and windows, was the first part of President Daniel L. Marsh's plan to move BU west of Kenmore Square. Construction of the other buildings on the block at 675-755 Commonwealth Ave. was interrupted by World War II and completed in 1948.
Boston - Boston University - Boston University East and the Tsai Performance Center Completed in 1989, the Tsai Performance Center at Boston University defines the ideal performance space for concerts, theatrical and dance presentations, lectures, film programs, and conferences. Situated in the College of Arts and Sciences building in the heart of the Boston University campus, the Tsai Performance Center radiates a simple warmth and elegance, embracing fully supported sound and lighting systems to meet the demands of the most complex events. The Charles Hayden Memorial Building, at 685 Commonwealth Ave., is named for Charles Hayden (1870-1937), an MIT graduate who founded the investment banking firm Hayden, Stone & Company. When Hayden died, he left a reported $50 million to a foundation in his name to educate young men. The foundation gave BU $586,000 to build a new College of Business Administration building in 1938. The building was constructed after the old College of Business Administration at 525 Boylston was razed in the early part of the decade. That building, formerly part of MIT until they moved to Cambridge played a key role in Boston University's move to the Charles River Campus. The six-story limestone collegiate Gothic structure, featuring arched doorways and windows, was the first part of President Daniel L. Marsh's plan to move BU west of Kenmore Square. Construction of the other buildings on the block at 675-755 Commonwealth Ave. was interrupted by World War II and completed in 1948.
Boston - Boston University - Green Line The "B" Branch of the Green Line, also called the Commonwealth Avenue Branch or Boston College Branch, on the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA, or T for short) runs on a surface right-of-way down the middle of Commonwealth Avenue. After going underground via the Blandford Street Incline, the tracks merge with the "C" and "D" Branches into Kenmore station. From there the Boylston Street Subway and Tremont Street Subway carry "B" cars to downtown Boston, with regular service turning around at Government Center. The "E" Branch splits to the southwest just west of Copley into the Huntington Avenue Subway. From 1942 to 1967, this route was known by the map number of 62. Since then it has been the "B" Branch. The Green Line, a light rail/streetcar system, is the oldest line of Boston's subway and the most heavily-used light rail line in the country. Given the green color because it runs though the area called the Emerald Necklace, the four branches are the remnants of a once large system, begun in 1856 with the Cambridge Horse Railroad. The Tremont Street Subway carries cars of all branches under downtown, and is the oldest subway tunnel in North America, opened in stages between September 1, 1897 and September 3, 1898 to take streetcars off surface streets. In 1896, tracks were laid on Commonwealth Avenue from Chestnut Hill Avenue west to the Newton town line at Lake Street, and around the same time the Commonwealth Avenue Street Railway opened, extending the tracks through Newton to Norumbega Park; this later became part of the Middlesex and Boston Street Railway. Trains between Lake Street and downtown Boston used tracks on Beacon Street, now part of the "C" Branch. From Kenmore Square they continued east on Beacon Street, then turned south on Massachusetts Avenue and east on Boylston Street to Park Square. In 1900 tracks were installed on the rest of Commonwealth Avenue, from Chestnut Hill Avenue east to existing tracks at Packard's Corner, later part of the "A" Branch. In 1909, the tracks were electrified. After the Tremont Street Subway opened, the Commonwealth Avenue line was rerouted to turn around at Park Street via the Boylston Street Incline at the Public Gardens. The Boylston Street Subway opened on October 3, 1914, extending the underground portion to the Kenmore Incline just east of Kenmore Square. On October 23, 1932 the Blandford Street Incline opened along with the underground Kenmore station, giving the line its present configuration.
Boston - Boston University - BU Bridge The Boston University Bridge, or BU Bridge, carries Route 2 over the Charles River connecting Boston to Cambridge. It is named for Boston University, which lies at the south end of the bridge. Opened in 1928 as US 1 on the site of the former Cottage Farm Bridge, it was designed by the architectural firm Desmond and Lord, while Lewis E. Moore consulted on, and John R. Rablin of the Metropolitan District Commission supervised, the engineering aspects of its construction. The B.U. Bridge actually consists of two units: a reinforced concrete highway suspended diagonally above a steel plate girder railroad bridge, carrying the CSX Transportation Grand Junction Line. Two reinforced concrete arches flank the structure's central steel arch. This central feature, painted green, has a two-hinged, non-parallel, curved top and a bottom chord through which the highway is suspended. Approaches to the bridge are constructed of reinforced concrete and masonry with neoclassical granite moldings. During the period of planning for the Inner Belt, the BU Bridge represented the planned crossing point of the highway from Boston to Cambridge. Several plans were discussed for the area; had the road been built over the river, the bridge would have been demolished and replaced with a high-level highway overpass, while if the road had been built as a tunnel, the bridge would have been left standing as a crossing for surface route traffic. The BU Bridge is the only spot in America where a plane can fly over a car driving over a train going over a boat at the same time.
Boston - Boston University - George Sherman Union The George Sherman Union, at 775 Commonwealth Ave., is named for the Boston industrialist, philanthropist, and BU benefactor George Sherman, who made the naming gift for the student center. The GSU opened its doors in the spring of 1963 and was modeled after student union buildings at Midwestern universities, which were the social cores of their campuses. Facilities include the Union Court dining areas, games room, lounges, study areas, television viewing areas, a ballroom, student organization offices, administrative offices, meeting rooms, and a convenience store. In the basement is a branch of the United States Post Office; and a bank is located in the Link.
Boston - Boston University - Green Line The "B" Branch of the Green Line, also called the Commonwealth Avenue Branch or Boston College Branch, on the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA, or T for short) runs on a surface right-of-way down the middle of Commonwealth Avenue. After going underground via the Blandford Street Incline, the tracks merge with the "C" and "D" Branches into Kenmore station. From there the Boylston Street Subway and Tremont Street Subway carry "B" cars to downtown Boston, with regular service turning around at Government Center. The "E" Branch splits to the southwest just west of Copley into the Huntington Avenue Subway. From 1942 to 1967, this route was known by the map number of 62. Since then it has been the "B" Branch. The Green Line, a light rail/streetcar system, is the oldest line of Boston's subway and the most heavily-used light rail line in the country. Given the green color because it runs though the area called the Emerald Necklace, the four branches are the remnants of a once large system, begun in 1856 with the Cambridge Horse Railroad. The Tremont Street Subway carries cars of all branches under downtown, and is the oldest subway tunnel in North America, opened in stages between September 1, 1897 and September 3, 1898 to take streetcars off surface streets. In 1896, tracks were laid on Commonwealth Avenue from Chestnut Hill Avenue west to the Newton town line at Lake Street, and around the same time the Commonwealth Avenue Street Railway opened, extending the tracks through Newton to Norumbega Park; this later became part of the Middlesex and Boston Street Railway. Trains between Lake Street and downtown Boston used tracks on Beacon Street, now part of the "C" Branch. From Kenmore Square they continued east on Beacon Street, then turned south on Massachusetts Avenue and east on Boylston Street to Park Square. In 1900 tracks were installed on the rest of Commonwealth Avenue, from Chestnut Hill Avenue east to existing tracks at Packard's Corner, later part of the "A" Branch. In 1909, the tracks were electrified. After the Tremont Street Subway opened, the Commonwealth Avenue line was rerouted to turn around at Park Street via the Boylston Street Incline at the Public Gardens. The Boylston Street Subway opened on October 3, 1914, extending the underground portion to the Kenmore Incline just east of Kenmore Square. On October 23, 1932 the Blandford Street Incline opened along with the underground Kenmore station, giving the line its present configuration.
NYC - TriBeCa
NYC - West Village: Fire Patrol House 2 - Keith Roma plaque Dedicated to the memory of Lieutenant Patrolman Keith Roma, Fire Patrol 2 Who made the supreme sacrifice while in the performance of duty operating at Manhattan Box 5-5-8087 World Trade Center September 11, 2001 Staten Island's Keith Roma bravely evacuated citizens from Tower One and was standing beside Fire Patrol Sgt. John Sheehan when Tower Two collapsed. Sheehan managed to get out; Roma did not. He is the only fire patrol officer missing of the 18 who initially responded. His father, Arnie, a former fire patrolman and retired New York Police Department officer, was in the lobby of Tower Two when it collapsed. He escaped through a hole in the wall on the Liberty Street side. The New York Fire Patrol consists of about 100 employees based at three city stationhouses. Funded by companies that write fire insurance policies, the fire patrol's mission is to respond to calls and help salvage property. Once on site, the Fire Patrol is under the command of the fire department.
NYC - TriBeCa: New York Mercantile Exchange Building The New York Mercantile Exchange Building, at 2-6 Harrison Street, was designed by Thomas R. Jackson in 1886. The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), which was originally organized in 1872 by a group of Manhattan dairy merchants as the Butter and Cheese Exchange and has grown to the largest physical commodities exchange in the word has long since vacated the building. More recently it housed Local 1180 of the Communications Workers of America, which represents city workers in the public hospitals, Board of Ed, Transit Authority and Housing Authority, among others. It has recently been converted to condominiums, and has housed Karen and David Waltuck's New American restaurant, Chanterelle, on its ground floor since 1989. The five-story gabled brick building features a handsome tower and rusticated granite pillars at the base. The tall second-story windows opened onto the trading floor, where on a good day at the turn of the century $15,000 worth of eggs changed hands in an hour.
NYC - TriBeCa: New York Mercantile Exchange Building The New York Mercantile Exchange Building, at 2-6 Harrison Street, was designed by Thomas R. Jackson in 1886. The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), which was originally organized in 1872 by a group of Manhattan dairy merchants as the Butter and Cheese Exchange and has grown to the largest physical commodities exchange in the word has long since vacated the building. More recently it housed Local 1180 of the Communications Workers of America, which represents city workers in the public hospitals, Board of Ed, Transit Authority and Housing Authority, among others. It has recently been converted to condominiums, and has housed Karen and David Waltuck's New American restaurant, Chanterelle, on its ground floor since 1989. The five-story gabled brick building features a handsome tower and rusticated granite pillars at the base. The tall second-story windows opened onto the trading floor, where on a good day at the turn of the century $15,000 worth of eggs changed hands in an hour.
NYC - TriBeCa: Harrison Street Houses In the shadows of Independence Plaza, on Harrison St, stand a row of six restored 18th-century townhouses, known as the Harrison Street Houses. They were originally elegant Federal houses, recycled as produce market buildings. Three of them were built on Harrison Street and the rest relocated from a now extinct part of Washington Street 2 blocks away, which was demapped as part of the Independence Plaza project in 1975. Harrison St. was named after George Harrison (not the Beatle), whose brewery once stood near this location in the Pre-Revolutionary mid-18th century. 25 Harrison Street and 27 Harrison Street were built by John McComb, Jr., New York's first home-grown architect and designer of City Hall, Hamilton Grange, the James Watson House and Castle Clinton. #25 is known as the Old Wool House. It was originally sitted at 315 Washington Street and dates to 1819. #27 is the old McComb house, where the architect lived. It was originally sitted at 317 Washington Street and dates to 1796. The other houses relocated from Washington Street include the Jonas Wood House (314 Washington, 1804), Wilson Hunt House (327 Washington, 1828), Joseph Randolph House (329 Washington, 1828) and William R. Nichols House (331 Washington, 1828). 29 Harrison Street, original the Sarah R. Lambert House; 331 Harrison Street, originally the Jacob Ruckle House; and 33 Harrison Street, originally the Ebenezer Miller House, all date to 1827 and are on their original site. 25-41 Harrison Street were designated as individual landmarks by the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1969.
NYC - TriBeCa: Smith Barney-Citigroup Building This 1989 building by Kohn Pedersen Fox was once the headquarters of the Travelers Group, of which Smith Barney was a brokerage arm. When Travelers was bought by Citigroup, the largest financial services company in the world, the building was given to the former subsidiary, but it retains the enormous and garish light-up Travelers umbrella that outraged neighbors.

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