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Ruins, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Steep Stairs, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Temple Podium, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
'Dancer' Reliefs, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
'Dancer' Reliefs, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
'Dancer' Reliefs, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
'Dancer' Reliefs, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Zapotec Temple, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Steep Staircase, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Zapotec Ruins, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Stele, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Zapotec Ruins, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Ruins of Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Pyramid-like Temple, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Temple Forecourt, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
At Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Ruins of Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Zapotec Pyramids, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
At Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Lower Terrace, Monte Alban The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside. The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it's decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten. The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the 'Dancers' due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!). Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n
Moctezuma, Puebla Detail of a colourful contemporary mural featuring iconic Mexican images and historical figures in one of the side streets of Puebla's historic city centre.
Aztec Characters Temporary mural decoration representing traditional Aztec cultural artefacts and deites, decorating a partition separating the archaeological area of the Templo Major from the Cathedral precinct in Mexico City.
Aztec Faces Temporary mural decoration representing traditional Aztec cultural artefacts and deites, decorating a partition separating the archaeological area of the Templo Major from the Cathedral precinct in Mexico City.
Aztec Characters Temporary mural decoration representing traditional Aztec cultural artefacts and deites, decorating a partition separating the archaeological area of the Templo Major from the Cathedral precinct in Mexico City.
Aztec Faces Temporary mural decoration representing traditional Aztec cultural artefacts and deites, decorating a partition separating the archaeological area of the Templo Major from the Cathedral precinct in Mexico City.
Snake Mural, Mexico City Colourful mural decoration on a temporary wall adjoining the Templo Major site in Mexico City.
Aztec Images Temporary mural decoration representing traditional Aztec cultural artefacts and deites, decorating a partition separating the archaeological area of the Templo Major from the Cathedral precinct in Mexico City.
Pyramid of the Sun, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Pyramid of the Moon, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Pyramid of the Sun, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Damaged Feline Sculpture, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Descending the Pyramid, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Descending the Pyramid, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Pyramid of the Moon, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Summit of Pyramid of the Sun, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Avenue of the Dead, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Avenue of the Dead, Teotihuacan Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan
Climbing the Pyramid Teotihuacan is one of the most famous and important sites of ancient Mexico, best known for it's enormous Avenue of the Dead and the great pyramids of the Sun and Moon. Although the site was known in Aztec times as the 'Birthplace of the Gods' it is actually significantly older, with most of the major structures built between 100-250AD and the city, one of the largest ever ancient settlements in the Americas, was believed to have been still inhabited up to the 8th century. Today the vast scale of the complex, particularly the so called Avenue of the Dead, nearly 3km long and flanked by ancient ruins and terraces, continues to awe visitors. At the north end of the Avenue sits the Pyramid of the Moon, whilst it's much larger counterpart, the Pyramid of the Sun, sits halfway up it's eastern side. At the southern end sits the Ciudadela complex which centres on the smaller pyramid of Quetzelcoatl, earlier and more ruined than the larger pyramids but retaining it's stunning original sculptural decoration on part of it's western face, featuring the iconic feathered serpent heads. Aside from the great ceremonial structures there are also residential buildings, particularly the palatial complex at the north west corner that retains some vivid fragments of it's original mural decoration. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan

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