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Силуэт жен.головки
Портрет Сергея Галанина
Маки-2 сюжетаФ
Ирисы и каллы
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Sten med skålgropar
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Снеговичная троица Ф осн. перед
Shrines, Wat Phra Phutthabat Wat Phra Phutthabat is located some distance south of the city of Lop Buri, and is a beautiful temple built in the 17th century to enshrine the site of one of the Lord Buddha's footprints (identified in a roughly foot-shaped pool by a white stag whose statue stands nearby). The 'footprint' itself is now a large gilded cavity beneath a rich shrine in the most stunning building on the site, the gloriously gilded main shrine, crowned by a spire and very similar to the phra mondop at Wat Phra Kaew in Bangkok. The whole temple complex is a delight to explore and features numerous lesser shrines and some rather fearsome looking Nagas! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Phutthabat_District
Scary Nagas, Wat Phra Phutthabat Wat Phra Phutthabat is located some distance south of the city of Lop Buri, and is a beautiful temple built in the 17th century to enshrine the site of one of the Lord Buddha's footprints (identified in a roughly foot-shaped pool by a white stag whose statue stands nearby). The 'footprint' itself is now a large gilded cavity beneath a rich shrine in the most stunning building on the site, the gloriously gilded main shrine, crowned by a spire and very similar to the phra mondop at Wat Phra Kaew in Bangkok. The whole temple complex is a delight to explore and features numerous lesser shrines and some rather fearsome looking Nagas! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Phutthabat_District
Sinister Nagas, Wat Phra Phutthabat Wat Phra Phutthabat is located some distance south of the city of Lop Buri, and is a beautiful temple built in the 17th century to enshrine the site of one of the Lord Buddha's footprints (identified in a roughly foot-shaped pool by a white stag whose statue stands nearby). The 'footprint' itself is now a large gilded cavity beneath a rich shrine in the most stunning building on the site, the gloriously gilded main shrine, crowned by a spire and very similar to the phra mondop at Wat Phra Kaew in Bangkok. The whole temple complex is a delight to explore and features numerous lesser shrines and some rather fearsome looking Nagas! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Phutthabat_District
Yaksha Guardian, Wat Phra Phutthabat Wat Phra Phutthabat is located some distance south of the city of Lop Buri, and is a beautiful temple built in the 17th century to enshrine the site of one of the Lord Buddha's footprints (identified in a roughly foot-shaped pool by a white stag whose statue stands nearby). The 'footprint' itself is now a large gilded cavity beneath a rich shrine in the most stunning building on the site, the gloriously gilded main shrine, crowned by a spire and very similar to the phra mondop at Wat Phra Kaew in Bangkok. The whole temple complex is a delight to explore and features numerous lesser shrines and some rather fearsome looking Nagas! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Phutthabat_District
Monk & Yaksha, Wat Phra Phutthabat Wat Phra Phutthabat is located some distance south of the city of Lop Buri, and is a beautiful temple built in the 17th century to enshrine the site of one of the Lord Buddha's footprints (identified in a roughly foot-shaped pool by a white stag whose statue stands nearby). The 'footprint' itself is now a large gilded cavity beneath a rich shrine in the most stunning building on the site, the gloriously gilded main shrine, crowned by a spire and very similar to the phra mondop at Wat Phra Kaew in Bangkok. The whole temple complex is a delight to explore and features numerous lesser shrines and some rather fearsome looking Nagas! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Phutthabat_District
Wat Phra Phutthabat Wat Phra Phutthabat is located some distance south of the city of Lop Buri, and is a beautiful temple built in the 17th century to enshrine the site of one of the Lord Buddha's footprints (identified in a roughly foot-shaped pool by a white stag whose statue stands nearby). The 'footprint' itself is now a large gilded cavity beneath a rich shrine in the most stunning building on the site, the gloriously gilded main shrine, crowned by a spire and very similar to the phra mondop at Wat Phra Kaew in Bangkok. The whole temple complex is a delight to explore and features numerous lesser shrines and some rather fearsome looking Nagas! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Phutthabat_District
Pavilion, Bang Pa-In Palace The Royal Palace at Bang Pa-In, some distance from the former capital city of Ayutthaya, remains in occasional use as an official royal residence of the Thai monarchy and is a feast for the eyes. The Palace complex dates to the mid 19th century and comprises a fascinating mixture of styles, set in extensive and beautiful gardens, giving it a highly European flavour. The main residential part of the palace too seems to have come straight from 19th century Europe, with it's neo-classical and Baroque features. The interiors are similarly styled and furnished, though occaisionally traditional Thai motives are woven in, such as in the throne room, but one has to keep reminding oneself that this is still Asia! The first impression of the palace across the artifical lake is stunning as the most beautiful feature, a gilded traditional Thai style pavilion, sits here and appears to float in the water, casting stunning reflections on it's surface. It is approached via a bridge graced with very European neo-classical statues. Other parts of the complex continue to mix international styles, with a whimsical brightly coloured cylindrical observation tower (looking for all the world as if it would belong in some central European royal park) standing next to a stunning Chinese style hall, swarming with dragon and fish roof finials and an ornate red and gold interior. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bang_Pa-In_Royal_Palace
"Floating" Pavilion, Bang Pa-In Palace The Royal Palace at Bang Pa-In, some distance from the former capital city of Ayutthaya, remains in occasional use as an official royal residence of the Thai monarchy and is a feast for the eyes. The Palace complex dates to the mid 19th century and comprises a fascinating mixture of styles, set in extensive and beautiful gardens, giving it a highly European flavour. The main residential part of the palace too seems to have come straight from 19th century Europe, with it's neo-classical and Baroque features. The interiors are similarly styled and furnished, though occaisionally traditional Thai motives are woven in, such as in the throne room, but one has to keep reminding oneself that this is still Asia! The first impression of the palace across the artifical lake is stunning as the most beautiful feature, a gilded traditional Thai style pavilion, sits here and appears to float in the water, casting stunning reflections on it's surface. It is approached via a bridge graced with very European neo-classical statues. Other parts of the complex continue to mix international styles, with a whimsical brightly coloured cylindrical observation tower (looking for all the world as if it would belong in some central European royal park) standing next to a stunning Chinese style hall, swarming with dragon and fish roof finials and an ornate red and gold interior. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bang_Pa-In_Royal_Palace
Memorial Shrine, Bang Pa-In Royal Palace The Royal Palace at Bang Pa-In, some distance from the former capital city of Ayutthaya, remains in occasional use as an official royal residence of the Thai monarchy and is a feast for the eyes. The Palace complex dates to the mid 19th century and comprises a fascinating mixture of styles, set in extensive and beautiful gardens, giving it a highly European flavour. The main residential part of the palace too seems to have come straight from 19th century Europe, with it's neo-classical and Baroque features. The interiors are similarly styled and furnished, though occaisionally traditional Thai motives are woven in, such as in the throne room, but one has to keep reminding oneself that this is still Asia! The first impression of the palace across the artifical lake is stunning as the most beautiful feature, a gilded traditional Thai style pavilion, sits here and appears to float in the water, casting stunning reflections on it's surface. It is approached via a bridge graced with very European neo-classical statues. Other parts of the complex continue to mix international styles, with a whimsical brightly coloured cylindrical observation tower (looking for all the world as if it would belong in some central European royal park) standing next to a stunning Chinese style hall, swarming with dragon and fish roof finials and an ornate red and gold interior. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bang_Pa-In_Royal_Palace
Cave Shrine, Thailand Cave shrine next to the Burma railway, containing a gilded Buddha image (sadly his head was a little too small!).
Сердце 3 Перед осн.Ф
Сердце 3 Задник Ф
Сердце 3 ПередФ
Сердце 3 Перед осн.Ф
Fertility Shrine, Bangkok The Chao Mae Tuptim Fertility Shrine is one of Bangkok's most obscure and surreal sights, a tiny 'garden of phalluses' hidden in the grounds of a large modern hotel. The shrine is popular with women who wish to become pregnant and thus various phallic images have been dedicated to that purposes (it obviously has a good track record! www.thailand-travel-guide.co.uk/chao-mae-tuptim-shrine-ph...
Dedicatory Figurines, Fertility Shrine, Bangkok The Chao Mae Tuptim Fertility Shrine is one of Bangkok's most obscure and surreal sights, a tiny 'garden of phalluses' hidden in the grounds of a large modern hotel. The shrine is popular with women who wish to become pregnant and thus various phallic images have been dedicated to that purposes (it obviously has a good track record! www.thailand-travel-guide.co.uk/chao-mae-tuptim-shrine-ph...
Erawan Shrine, Bangkok The 'Erawan Shrine' dates from 1956 and reveres the Hindu creation god Brahma. It was erected on this site to offset negative forces supposedly unleashed by the construction of a nearby hotel. The central tabernacle contains an image of the god with four faces, whilst nearby are various sculptures of his elephant mount. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erawan_Shrine
Golden Elephants, Erawan Shrine, Bangkok The 'Erawan Shrine' dates from 1956 and reveres the Hindu creation god Brahma. It was erected on this site to offset negative forces supposedly unleashed by the construction of a nearby hotel. The central tabernacle contains an image of the god with four faces, whilst nearby are various sculptures of his elephant mount. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erawan_Shrine
Gilt Relief, Democracy Monument, Bangkok The Democracy Monument was erected in 1939 to commemorate the Siamise coup d'etat that ushered in initial military rule along with the present constitutional system of monarchy. There are thus references to the military in the four wing like structures surrounding the centrepiece and the relief sculptures at their bases. The monument is an attractive late flowering of the Art Deco style and was a symbol of the country's desire for modernisation. The very much 20th century forms are however combined with traditional Thai elements, particularly the sculptural elements such as the gilt bronze reliefs in the central structure and Garuda and Naga sculptures at the outer corners of the monument. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democracy_Monument
Wat Ratchanatdaram, Bangkok Wat Ratchanatdaram, a large temple of central Bangkok which by the end of the day we were too fatigued to explore properly!
Wat Saket, Bangkok Wat Saket is famed for the artificial hill and shrine known as the Golden Mount. The structure was originally intended to be an enormous chedi (stupa) but it's foundations were insufficient causing the construction to collapse. The resulting mound gradually begame overgrown, resembling a natural hill, and was ultimately crowned by a shrine containing a relic of the Buddha in the later 19th century. This was the highest structure in the city until the first modern highrises were built. The white marble temple of Wat Saket itself stands close by. As our visit coincided with the festival of Loi Krathong the whole site was alive with people, many making a devotional visit to the hilltop shrine, and av wonderful market packed with amazing food all the way around it's base (I have barely any decent photos of this, but Elspeth more than made up with her photos, though alas I have not yet been successful in persuading her to join Flickr!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket
Wat Saket, Bangkok Wat Saket is famed for the artificial hill and shrine known as the Golden Mount. The structure was originally intended to be an enormous chedi (stupa) but it's foundations were insufficient causing the construction to collapse. The resulting mound gradually begame overgrown, resembling a natural hill, and was ultimately crowned by a shrine containing a relic of the Buddha in the later 19th century. This was the highest structure in the city until the first modern highrises were built. The white marble temple of Wat Saket itself stands close by. As our visit coincided with the festival of Loi Krathong the whole site was alive with people, many making a devotional visit to the hilltop shrine, and av wonderful market packed with amazing food all the way around it's base (I have barely any decent photos of this, but Elspeth more than made up with her photos, though alas I have not yet been successful in persuading her to join Flickr!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket
Fair & Market, Golden Mount, Wat Saket, Bangkok Wat Saket is famed for the artificial hill and shrine known as the Golden Mount. The structure was originally intended to be an enormous chedi (stupa) but it's foundations were insufficient causing the construction to collapse. The resulting mound gradually begame overgrown, resembling a natural hill, and was ultimately crowned by a shrine containing a relic of the Buddha in the later 19th century. This was the highest structure in the city until the first modern highrises were built. The white marble temple of Wat Saket itself stands close by. As our visit coincided with the festival of Loi Krathong the whole site was alive with people, many making a devotional visit to the hilltop shrine, and av wonderful market packed with amazing food all the way around it's base (I have barely any decent photos of this, but Elspeth more than made up with her photos, though alas I have not yet been successful in persuading her to join Flickr!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket
Wat Saket, Bangkok Wat Saket is famed for the artificial hill and shrine known as the Golden Mount. The structure was originally intended to be an enormous chedi (stupa) but it's foundations were insufficient causing the construction to collapse. The resulting mound gradually begame overgrown, resembling a natural hill, and was ultimately crowned by a shrine containing a relic of the Buddha in the later 19th century. This was the highest structure in the city until the first modern highrises were built. The white marble temple of Wat Saket itself stands close by. As our visit coincided with the festival of Loi Krathong the whole site was alive with people, many making a devotional visit to the hilltop shrine, and av wonderful market packed with amazing food all the way around it's base (I have barely any decent photos of this, but Elspeth more than made up with her photos, though alas I have not yet been successful in persuading her to join Flickr!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket
Bell-Ringing, Golden Mount, Wat Saket, Bangkok Wat Saket is famed for the artificial hill and shrine known as the Golden Mount. The structure was originally intended to be an enormous chedi (stupa) but it's foundations were insufficient causing the construction to collapse. The resulting mound gradually begame overgrown, resembling a natural hill, and was ultimately crowned by a shrine containing a relic of the Buddha in the later 19th century. This was the highest structure in the city until the first modern highrises were built. The white marble temple of Wat Saket itself stands close by. As our visit coincided with the festival of Loi Krathong the whole site was alive with people, many making a devotional visit to the hilltop shrine, and av wonderful market packed with amazing food all the way around it's base (I have barely any decent photos of this, but Elspeth more than made up with her photos, though alas I have not yet been successful in persuading her to join Flickr!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket
Golden Mount, Wat Saket, Bangkok View over the rooftops of central Bangkok, as seen from the Golden Mount at Wat Saket.
Wat Saket, Bangkok View over the rooftops of central Bangkok, as seen from the Golden Mount at Wat Saket.
Golden Mount, Wat Saket, Bangkok Wat Saket is famed for the artificial hill and shrine known as the Golden Mount. The structure was originally intended to be an enormous chedi (stupa) but it's foundations were insufficient causing the construction to collapse. The resulting mound gradually begame overgrown, resembling a natural hill, and was ultimately crowned by a shrine containing a relic of the Buddha in the later 19th century. This was the highest structure in the city until the first modern highrises were built. The white marble temple of Wat Saket itself stands close by. As our visit coincided with the festival of Loi Krathong the whole site was alive with people, many making a devotional visit to the hilltop shrine, and av wonderful market packed with amazing food all the way around it's base (I have barely any decent photos of this, but Elspeth more than made up with her photos, though alas I have not yet been successful in persuading her to join Flickr!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket
Elephant Statue, Golden Mount, Wat Saket, Bangkok Wat Saket is famed for the artificial hill and shrine known as the Golden Mount. The structure was originally intended to be an enormous chedi (stupa) but it's foundations were insufficient causing the construction to collapse. The resulting mound gradually begame overgrown, resembling a natural hill, and was ultimately crowned by a shrine containing a relic of the Buddha in the later 19th century. This was the highest structure in the city until the first modern highrises were built. The white marble temple of Wat Saket itself stands close by. As our visit coincided with the festival of Loi Krathong the whole site was alive with people, many making a devotional visit to the hilltop shrine, and av wonderful market packed with amazing food all the way around it's base (I have barely any decent photos of this, but Elspeth more than made up with her photos, though alas I have not yet been successful in persuading her to join Flickr!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket
Golden Mount, Wat Saket, Bangkok Wat Saket is famed for the artificial hill and shrine known as the Golden Mount. The structure was originally intended to be an enormous chedi (stupa) but it's foundations were insufficient causing the construction to collapse. The resulting mound gradually begame overgrown, resembling a natural hill, and was ultimately crowned by a shrine containing a relic of the Buddha in the later 19th century. This was the highest structure in the city until the first modern highrises were built. The white marble temple of Wat Saket itself stands close by. As our visit coincided with the festival of Loi Krathong the whole site was alive with people, many making a devotional visit to the hilltop shrine, and av wonderful market packed with amazing food all the way around it's base (I have barely any decent photos of this, but Elspeth more than made up with her photos, though alas I have not yet been successful in persuading her to join Flickr!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket
Wat Saket, Bangkok Wat Saket is famed for the artificial hill and shrine known as the Golden Mount. The structure was originally intended to be an enormous chedi (stupa) but it's foundations were insufficient causing the construction to collapse. The resulting mound gradually begame overgrown, resembling a natural hill, and was ultimately crowned by a shrine containing a relic of the Buddha in the later 19th century. This was the highest structure in the city until the first modern highrises were built. The white marble temple of Wat Saket itself stands close by. As our visit coincided with the festival of Loi Krathong the whole site was alive with people, many making a devotional visit to the hilltop shrine, and av wonderful market packed with amazing food all the way around it's base (I have barely any decent photos of this, but Elspeth more than made up with her photos, though alas I have not yet been successful in persuading her to join Flickr!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket
Demon & Quanyin, Bangkok More statuary in the streets of Bangkok.
Buddhist Store, Bangkok One of the best places in Bangkok to buy Buddhist statuary from.
Buddhist Store, Bangkok One of the best places in Bangkok to buy Buddhist statuary from.
Medieval Stone Coffins, Coventry Cathedral Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawrence Lee of the Royal College of Art along with Keith New and Geoffrey Clarke (each artist designed three of the windows individually and all collaborated on the last). The cathedral still dazzles the visitor with the boldness of it's vision, but alas, half a century on, it was not a vision to be repeated and few of the churches and cathedrals built since can claim to have embraced the synthesis of art and architecture in the way Basil Spence did at Coventry. The cathedral is ge
Hopkins Tomb, Old Coventry Cathedral Damaged monument to Richard Hopkins (d.1707) in the former St Thomas's (Capper's) Chapel. It blocks the former east doorway into the south porch. The scar on the wall above suggests the tapering coloured marble slab, a typical Baroque feature, which once rose 15ft high and was adorned with three busts of the deceased and his family, sadly destroyed in the bombing.
Hopkins Monument, Old Coventry Cathedral Damaged monument to Richard Hopkins (d.1707) in the former St Thomas's (Capper's) Chapel. Originally erected on the north side of the apse, it blocks a former east doorway into the south porch. The scar on the wall above suggests the tapering dark marble slab, a typical Baroque feature, which once rose 15ft high and was adorned with three busts of the deceased and his family (the centremost set high on a plinth surmounting a small sarcophagus, that stood atop the remaining tomb chest), sadly destroyed in the bombing.

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