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Sheldon Tomb, Beoley St Leonards at Beoley, immediately north of Redditch, is one of north Worcestershire's most interesting churches. Dating back to 1140 with alterations and expansion over the following centuries there is much of antiquity here. Within the oldest feature is a worn 12th century relief of an abbot, probably St Leonard, whilst the equally ancient font is decorated by four smiling faces. There are also small fragments of medieval glass. The most significant items are the two large post-Reformation Sheldon monuments in the chancel, opening up into the Sheldon chapel on the north side (built in 1580 and larger than the chancel itself, built for the continuation of Catholic worship by the recusant Sheldon family). The chapel itself contains further noteworthy monuments including two Renaissance tombs, several Baroque tablets and a 13th century foliated cross grave slab. This church well rewards a visit, but alas is normally kept locked without keyholder information. I have lived nearby for over ten years but this was my first glimpse inside, it was quite a revelation!
Foliated Cross Studley's ancient parish church of the Nativity of Mary stands in a quiet rural location some distance to the east of the present thriving village next to the site of the medieval castle (now a privately owned manor house, the Victorian Studley Castle, now a hotel, is some distance further east). The church itself dates back to Norman times, most evident in the north wall of the nave which has a surviving tiny window and rich Romanesque surround to the north doorway. Much of the present building however dates from the 14th century onwards. Inside the finest medieval survival is the 13th century grave slab (believed to be from the long vanished Studley Priory) in the chancel, decorated with one of the finest foliated crosses in the country.
13th Century Grave Slab Studley's ancient parish church of the Nativity of Mary stands in a quiet rural location some distance to the east of the present thriving village next to the site of the medieval castle (now a privately owned manor house, the Victorian Studley Castle, now a hotel, is some distance further east). The church itself dates back to Norman times, most evident in the north wall of the nave which has a surviving tiny window and rich Romanesque surround to the north doorway. Much of the present building however dates from the 14th century onwards. Inside the finest medieval survival is the 13th century grave slab (believed to be from the long vanished Studley Priory) in the chancel, decorated with one of the finest foliated crosses in the country.
Saint & Angels, St Cuthbert's, Carlisle The parish church of St Cuthbert stands in the city centre and although on an ancient site the present building appears to be entirely 18th century in date, the medieval building having been demolished in 1778. It has a short west tower and an aisled nave with galleries on either side within. The church has some interesting stained glass, most importantly that collected from the old church in one of the north facing windows which mostly dates from the 14th century and features a fine figure of a saint (St John?). The church welcomes visitors and is usually open from 10am-4pm every day. www.stcuthbertscarlisle.org.uk/ Sadly my brief visit here was sullied by an unpleasant individual who had decided to occupy the church for use as a phone-booth with his mobile and seemed to have a strong aversion to anyone with a camera coming anywhere near him. Hopefully others will be able to experience this church in the peace and calm one usually expects.
Mary Window, Carlisle Window depicting Mary at prayer with Carlisle's churches behind her, the work of R.R.Nichol c1981. The parish church of St Cuthbert stands in the city centre and although on an ancient site the present building appears to be entirely 18th century in date, the medieval building having been demolished in 1778. It has a short west tower and an aisled nave with galleries on either side within. The church has some interesting stained glass, most importantly that collected from the old church in one of the north facing windows which mostly dates from the 14th century and features a fine figure of a saint (St John?). The church welcomes visitors and is usually open from 10am-4pm every day. www.stcuthbertscarlisle.org.uk/ Sadly my brief visit here was sullied by an unpleasant individual who had decided to occupy the church for use as a phone-booth with his mobile and seemed to have a strong aversion to anyone with a camera coming anywhere near him. Hopefully others will be able to experience this church in the peace and calm one usually expects.
St Cecilia Stained glass in the north aisle by celebrated Irish artist Evie Hone, 1947. Lanercost Priory is a unique former Augustinian priory church made all the more memorable by being split in half, the nave remaining in use as the parish church (with a brief interlude in the 17th-18th centuries when it became ruinous and the parish retreated to just the north aisle) and the ruined eastern end with crossing and transepts, now maintained by English Heritage and surprisingly complete aside from the lack of a roof (the vaulting remains in the north chapels). The nave is free to enter and has some good glass but otherwise is fairly empty, with an eerie view of the ruins visible through the post-medieval window in the dividing east wall. The ruins must be entered separately for a fee but are well worth it (far too shadowy to get many good shots of on my visit, though at least I had them entirely to myself). There are several tomb chests to members of the Dacre family gradually being lost to the weather. The still vaulted undercrofts of the monastic ranges are impressive too. I have mixed feelings about this ruined part, it's such a romantic ruin that it is uniquely special in this state, though the other part of me wants someone to stick a roof back on, knock through the wall into the nave and make the church whole again (can't see that happening somehow).
Justice One of a pair of enamelled stained glass windows by William Eginton (c1816) based on oil paintings by Sir Joshua Reynolds. They originally formed part of a set of six at St Margaret's church in Great Barr, but were removed when the church was rebuilt in 1862. Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery is one of the most important regional museums in the country, with collections ranging from archaeology to an extensive collection of fine art, including a superb sequence of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. There is also an impressive industrial gallery, which exhibits some of the highest quality crafts made in the city during the 19th century, most notably ceramics and stained glass. www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/bmag/about
Angel with Harp Part of a window designed by Selwyn Image in the 1920s for Powell's, originally in St Cleopas, Toxteh Park, Liverpool. Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery is one of the most important regional museums in the country, with collections ranging from archaeology to an extensive collection of fine art, including a superb sequence of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. There is also an impressive industrial gallery, which exhibits some of the highest quality crafts made in the city during the 19th century, most notably ceramics and stained glass. www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/bmag/about
Dante's Dream Detail of one of a trio of richly painted panels on the theme of Dante & Beatrice (based on Dante's poem of earthly & spiritual love, 'Vita Nuova') by Florence Camm and are superb examples of her work. They were made in 1911 and shown at the International Exhibition in Turin where they were awarded due recognition. Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery is one of the most important regional museums in the country, with collections ranging from archaeology to an extensive collection of fine art, including a superb sequence of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. There is also an impressive industrial gallery, which exhibits some of the highest quality crafts made in the city during the 19th century, most notably ceramics and stained glass. www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/bmag/about
Good Shepherd The first ever piece of stained glass designed by Edward Burne Jones (his earliest work strongly influenced by Rossetti) and made by Powell's. It was formerly in a Methodist chapel in Maidstone. Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery is one of the most important regional museums in the country, with collections ranging from archaeology to an extensive collection of fine art, including a superb sequence of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. There is also an impressive industrial gallery, which exhibits some of the highest quality crafts made in the city during the 19th century, most notably ceramics and stained glass. www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/bmag/about
Dante & Beatrice Detail of one of a trio of richly painted panels on the theme of Dante & Beatrice (based on Dante's poem of earthly & spiritual love, 'Vita Nuova') by Florence Camm and are superb examples of her work. They were made in 1911 and shown at the International Exhibition in Turin where they were awarded due recognition. Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery is one of the most important regional museums in the country, with collections ranging from archaeology to an extensive collection of fine art, including a superb sequence of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. There is also an impressive industrial gallery, which exhibits some of the highest quality crafts made in the city during the 19th century, most notably ceramics and stained glass. www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/bmag/about
Dante & Beatrice Detail of one of a trio of richly painted panels on the theme of Dante & Beatrice (based on Dante's poem of earthly & spiritual love, 'Vita Nuova') by Florence Camm and are superb examples of her work. They were made in 1911 and shown at the International Exhibition in Turin where they were awarded due recognition. Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery is one of the most important regional museums in the country, with collections ranging from archaeology to an extensive collection of fine art, including a superb sequence of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. There is also an impressive industrial gallery, which exhibits some of the highest quality crafts made in the city during the 19th century, most notably ceramics and stained glass. www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/bmag/about
Hope, Mickleton North aisle window by Burlison & Grylls, c1927. St Lawrence's church at Mickleton is a fairly large building with a Transitional nave flanked by unusually spacious aisles and surmounted by a soaring steeple at the west end. The nave arcades show the transition from Norman to Gothic styles in their broad round arches and carved capitals. The church was restored by Preedy in 1868, the glass in the east window is his work. This attractive church is normally open and welcoming to visitors in daylight hours.
Faith, Mickleton North aisle window by Burlison & Grylls, c1927. St Lawrence's church at Mickleton is a fairly large building with a Transitional nave flanked by unusually spacious aisles and surmounted by a soaring steeple at the west end. The nave arcades show the transition from Norman to Gothic styles in their broad round arches and carved capitals. The church was restored by Preedy in 1868, the glass in the east window is his work. This attractive church is normally open and welcoming to visitors in daylight hours.
St George (?!) North aisle window by Burlison & Grylls, c1906. St Lawrence's church at Mickleton is a fairly large building with a Transitional nave flanked by unusually spacious aisles and surmounted by a soaring steeple at the west end. The nave arcades show the transition from Norman to Gothic styles in their broad round arches and carved capitals. The church was restored by Preedy in 1868, the glass in the east window is his work. This attractive church is normally open and welcoming to visitors in daylight hours.
St Edward the Confessor North aisle window by Burlison & Grylls, c1906. St Lawrence's church at Mickleton is a fairly large building with a Transitional nave flanked by unusually spacious aisles and surmounted by a soaring steeple at the west end. The nave arcades show the transition from Norman to Gothic styles in their broad round arches and carved capitals. The church was restored by Preedy in 1868, the glass in the east window is his work. This attractive church is normally open and welcoming to visitors in daylight hours.
Resurrected Christ South chancel window by Frederick Preedy, c1862, and with its small, richly coloured scenes easily the most striking glass in the church. The window commemorates the family of Charles Augustus Hand who were drowned during a storm at sea in 1862. His father-in-law was then rector of this church and commissioned the window in memory of his daughter and her family. The images appropriately relate to their sacrifice at sea. The church of St Peter at Willersey is a handsome cruciform building, which has evolved throughout the medieval period reaching it's present form in the 15th century when the attractive central tower was built. Inside it is an intriguing sequence of intimate spaces, having no aisles except the rather cramped one on the north side of the nave. The crossing beneath the tower is especially beautiful, culminating in a vaulted ceiling (added in 1859). The chancel shows Victorian restoration but has some fetching glass.
Петушок-левая сторонаФ
Петушок-правая сторонаФ
Дед Морозик и Снегурочка сзадиФ
Дед Морозик и Снегурочка вместеФ
Снеговичная троица Ф осн. сзади
Снеговичная троица Ф осн. перед
Jonah South chancel window by Frederick Preedy, c1862, and with its small, richly coloured scenes easily the most striking glass in the church. The window commemorates the family of Charles Augustus Hand who were drowned during a storm at sea in 1862. His father-in-law was then rector of this church and commissioned the window in memory of his daughter and her family. The images appropriately relate to their sacrifice at sea. The church of St Peter at Willersey is a handsome cruciform building, which has evolved throughout the medieval period reaching it's present form in the 15th century when the attractive central tower was built. Inside it is an intriguing sequence of intimate spaces, having no aisles except the rather cramped one on the north side of the nave. The crossing beneath the tower is especially beautiful, culminating in a vaulted ceiling (added in 1859). The chancel shows Victorian restoration but has some fetching glass. The church is usually kept open and welcoming to visitors.
'Hope' The church of St Ecgwin at Honeybourne is a handsome local landmark with its soaring spire (springing from an oddly windowless belfry, whilst the rest of the tower is dramatically buttressed further down) and dates mainly from the 14th & 15th centuries. Entry to the building is via an unusual medieval porch with a roof of stone slabs. It is now more regularly open and welcoming to visitors www.worcesteranddudleyhistoricchurches.org.uk/index.php?p...
'Faith' The church of St Ecgwin at Honeybourne is a handsome local landmark with its soaring spire (springing from an oddly windowless belfry, whilst the rest of the tower is dramatically buttressed further down) and dates mainly from the 14th & 15th centuries. Entry to the building is via an unusual medieval porch with a roof of stone slabs. It is now more regularly open and welcoming to visitors www.worcesteranddudleyhistoricchurches.org.uk/index.php?p...
St Chad Detail of window by Florence Camm c1922 from the sanctuary of the former St Andrew's church at Darlaston. The painting is beautifully executed and typical of Camm's consistently high standards. The glass has since been removed and remounted in artificially lit units at Darlaston Town Hall, these photos being the very last ever taken of the windows in their original setting with natural light. The redundant and derelict St Andrew's church in Darlaston (built in 1893; also known as St Andrew's, Kingshill, Wednesbury) closed in 2009 and was sold for redevelopment a couple of years ago (it is likely to be demolished, assuming it hasn't gone already). Luckily there was interest in saving the high quality Arts & Crafts windows from the apse which are the work of Florence Camm. The windows (which were dedicated to the fallen of the War) were rescued in 2013 and have since been remounted in Darlaston Town Hall. www.blackcountrybugle.co.uk/5-historic-stained-glass-wind...
Apostles Stained glass by John Hardman Studios of Birmingham (later than the glass in the main church, closer to c1930) salvaged from the previous church and worked into a new richly coloured abstract setting by the same studio when the church was replaced by a modern building in the 1960s. St Catherine's Roman Catholic church was opened in 1965, having been designed by Harrison & Cox to replace a nearby Victorian structure that was sacrificed to make way for the city's inner ring road in 1961. The church is a major landmark overlooking the A38 leading into the heart of the city, but one I'd never been able to get into until attending a Sunday mass. The internal space is impressive, and somewhat difficult to photograph. It is very much a post Vatican II church, the altar is centrally placed, but not quite in the round as the area behind is divided off to form a separate Lady chapel. The most striking feature for me however was the glass, much of it is salvaged from the previous church and typical Hardman's c1890s, but it has been adapted in a rather unique way with the figurative subjects isolated upon brightly coloured and clearly modern backgrounds to fill the spaces of much larger windows. The effect is far more successful than it might sound and the colour from the rich background glass (also by Hardman's!) really enlivens the interior. www.stcatherinesbirmingham.org/
St Peter Stained glass by John Hardman Studios of Birmingham (later than the glass in the main church, closer to c1930) salvaged from the previous church and worked into a new richly coloured abstract setting by the same studio when the church was replaced by a modern building in the 1960s. St Catherine's Roman Catholic church was opened in 1965, having been designed by Harrison & Cox to replace a nearby Victorian structure that was sacrificed to make way for the city's inner ring road in 1961. The church is a major landmark overlooking the A38 leading into the heart of the city, but one I'd never been able to get into until attending a Sunday mass. The internal space is impressive, and somewhat difficult to photograph. It is very much a post Vatican II church, the altar is centrally placed, but not quite in the round as the area behind is divided off to form a separate Lady chapel. The most striking feature for me however was the glass, much of it is salvaged from the previous church and typical Hardman's c1890s, but it has been adapted in a rather unique way with the figurative subjects isolated upon brightly coloured and clearly modern backgrounds to fill the spaces of much larger windows. The effect is far more successful than it might sound and the colour from the rich background glass (also by Hardman's!) really enlivens the interior. www.stcatherinesbirmingham.org/
Apostles Stained glass by John Hardman Studios of Birmingham (later than the glass in the main church, closer to c1930) salvaged from the previous church and worked into a new richly coloured abstract setting by the same studio when the church was replaced by a modern building in the 1960s. St Catherine's Roman Catholic church was opened in 1965, having been designed by Harrison & Cox to replace a nearby Victorian structure that was sacrificed to make way for the city's inner ring road in 1961. The church is a major landmark overlooking the A38 leading into the heart of the city, but one I'd never been able to get into until attending a Sunday mass. The internal space is impressive, and somewhat difficult to photograph. It is very much a post Vatican II church, the altar is centrally placed, but not quite in the round as the area behind is divided off to form a separate Lady chapel. The most striking feature for me however was the glass, much of it is salvaged from the previous church and typical Hardman's c1890s, but it has been adapted in a rather unique way with the figurative subjects isolated upon brightly coloured and clearly modern backgrounds to fill the spaces of much larger windows. The effect is far more successful than it might sound and the colour from the rich background glass (also by Hardman's!) really enlivens the interior. www.stcatherinesbirmingham.org/
Hope Faith, Hope & Charity Window by T.H.Yates of Smethwick c1895. The glass appears to have been salvaged from church during its subsequent demolition. Headless Cross Methodist Church first opened in 1896 but closed for worship in 2009 and was subsequently sold. My photographs were taken on the very last day of the church's ownership of the building in 2014 as it passed to a new owner who plans redevelop the site for housing and has since demolished the building. The rare filigree spire was a local landmark and a beautiful flourish which will be greatly missed. There is a slim hope it may be saved and re-erected elsewhere as the demolition has currently left it standing alone, awaiting dismantling. www.flickr.com/photos/tudorbarlow/26275626615/in/photolis...
Charity Faith, Hope & Charity Window by T.H.Yates of Smethwick c1895. The glass appears to have been salvaged from church during its subsequent demolition. Headless Cross Methodist Church first opened in 1896 but closed for worship in 2009 and was subsequently sold. My photographs were taken on the very last day of the church's ownership of the building in 2014 as it passed to a new owner who plans redevelop the site for housing and has since demolished the building. The rare filigree spire was a local landmark and a beautiful flourish which will be greatly missed. There is a slim hope it may be saved and re-erected elsewhere as the demolition has currently left it standing alone, awaiting dismantling. www.flickr.com/photos/tudorbarlow/26275626615/in/photolis...
Faith Faith, Hope & Charity Window by T.H.Yates of Smethwick c1895. The glass appears to have been salvaged from church during its subsequent demolition. Headless Cross Methodist Church first opened in 1896 but closed for worship in 2009 and was subsequently sold. My photographs were taken on the very last day of the church's ownership of the building in 2014 as it passed to a new owner who plans redevelop the site for housing and has since demolished the building. The rare filigree spire was a local landmark and a beautiful flourish which will be greatly missed. There is a slim hope it may be saved and re-erected elsewhere as the demolition has currently left it standing alone, awaiting dismantling. www.flickr.com/photos/tudorbarlow/26275626615/in/photolis...
Мешочек Гномики 1
Мешочек.Оборотка1
Мешочек.Перед1
Горшочек Весенний31
Горшочек Весенний2
Горшочек Весенний1.1
Elizabethan Memorial Brass St Michael's at Ufton is a largely 14th/15th century building perched on a hilltop overlooking the Fosse Way. The nave has aisles on both sides, but that on the north is oddly shortened so that it appears more of a side chapel. Inside there is much early Victorian glass (most apparently by Hardmans and Chance, both of Birmingham) and a c1960 east window of the church's patron saint, Archangel Michael. The most notable ancient item is the small Elizabethan family brass on the south wall of the chancel . The church is normally kept locked and no longer supplies a keyholder notice (a tightening of the lock apparently in response to the recent spate of arson attacks in the area). It was pure luck that got me inside thanks to a local lady busy cleaning the church.
King Offa's Coffin, Offchurch Offchurch owes it's name to an association with Offa, king of Mercia, having reputedly founded the first church here. Fragments of an ancient stone coffin within the present building are believed to have belonged to his burial. The present St Gregory's church is an aiseless largely 12th century building (the windows mostly altered in the 14th century when the chancel was extended) with a 15th century tower. The interior is somewhat gloomy from the Victorian glass that filled every window, though a recently installed abstract window at the west end (by Roger Sargent who lives in the village) casts a serene blue light across the nave. Apart from the remains of Offa's coffin there are several minor wall tablets from the Baroque period.
Baroque Tablet Baroque tablet on the south side of the nave at Offchurch. Offchurch owes it's name to an association with Offa, king of Mercia, having reputedly founded the first church here. Fragments of an ancient stone coffin within the present building are believed to have belonged to his burial. The present St Gregory's church is an aiseless largely 12th century building (the windows mostly altered in the 14th century when the chancel was extended) with a 15th century tower. The interior is somewhat gloomy from the Victorian glass that filled every window, though a recently installed abstract window at the west end (by Roger Sargent who lives in the village) casts a serene blue light across the nave. Apart from the remains of Offa's coffin there are several minor wall tablets from the Baroque period.
Memorial Tablet St Mary's at Cubbington on the eastern fringe of Leamington Spa largely dates back to the 12th century, the tower and south nave arcade in particular being good examples of Norman work. The interior is somewhat dark owing to a profusion of Victorian stained glass windows. There is an interesting 17th century cartouche memorial attached to the wall adjoining the chancel arch.
14th Century Brass SS Peter & Paul at Deddington displays the warm toffee-colouring of north Oxfordshire's ironstone to good effect. The tower with it's gilt-weathervaned pinnacles is the main landmark of this small town. The main body of this very grand church dates mostly from the 13th and 14th centuries, but the tower and west end of the aisles were built after the original steeple collapsed in 1634. Rebuilding was interrupted by the Civil War and not completed untuil 1683-5. This 17th century work blends well with the medieval church, only in some of the carved details of doors and windows is the later date apparent. Statues of the church's patron saints were re-used on the west side (only their lower halfs are medieval). The spacious interior contains two medieval monuments and a curious north porch with a shallow gothic dome (part of the 17th century reconstruction). The most significant artworks are in stained glass; there are two windows by C.E.Kempe, but far more impressive are the superb Arts & Crafts period windows in the north aisle by Archibald J. Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild, some of the very finest glass of it's date. For more see below:- www.deddington.org.uk/history/churchesandchapels/jonesmem...
SS Peter & Paul at Deddington displays the warm toffee-colouring of north Oxfordshire's ironstone to good effect. The tower with it's gilt-weathervaned pinnacles is the main landmark of this small town. The main body of this very grand church dates mostly from the 13th and 14th centuries, but the tower and west end of the aisles were built after the original steeple collapsed in 1634. Rebuilding was interrupted by the Civil War and not completed untuil 1683-5. This 17th century work blends well with the medieval church, only in some of the carved details of doors and windows is the later date apparent. Statues of the church's patron saints were re-used on the west side (only their lower halfs are medieval). The spacious interior contains two medieval monuments and a curious north porch with a shallow gothic dome (part of the 17th century reconstruction). The most significant artworks are in stained glass; there are two windows by C.E.Kempe, but far more impressive are the superb Arts & Crafts period windows in the north aisle by Archibald J. Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild, some of the very finest glass of it's date. For more see below:- www.deddington.org.uk/history/churchesandchapels/jonesmem...
Belchier Monument SS Peter & Paul at Deddington displays the warm toffee-colouring of north Oxfordshire's ironstone to good effect. The tower with it's gilt-weathervaned pinnacles is the main landmark of this small town. The main body of this very grand church dates mostly from the 13th and 14th centuries, but the tower and west end of the aisles were built after the original steeple collapsed in 1634. Rebuilding was interrupted by the Civil War and not completed untuil 1683-5. This 17th century work blends well with the medieval church, only in some of the carved details of doors and windows is the later date apparent. Statues of the church's patron saints were re-used on the west side (only their lower halfs are medieval). The spacious interior contains two medieval monuments and a curious north porch with a shallow gothic dome (part of the 17th century reconstruction). The most significant artworks are in stained glass; there are two windows by C.E.Kempe, but far more impressive are the superb Arts & Crafts period windows in the north aisle by Archibald J. Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild, some of the very finest glass of it's date. For more see below:- www.deddington.org.uk/history/churchesandchapels/jonesmem...
14th Century Judge SS Peter & Paul at Deddington displays the warm toffee-colouring of north Oxfordshire's ironstone to good effect. The tower with it's gilt-weathervaned pinnacles is the main landmark of this small town. The main body of this very grand church dates mostly from the 13th and 14th centuries, but the tower and west end of the aisles were built after the original steeple collapsed in 1634. Rebuilding was interrupted by the Civil War and not completed untuil 1683-5. This 17th century work blends well with the medieval church, only in some of the carved details of doors and windows is the later date apparent. Statues of the church's patron saints were re-used on the west side (only their lower halfs are medieval). The spacious interior contains two medieval monuments and a curious north porch with a shallow gothic dome (part of the 17th century reconstruction). The most significant artworks are in stained glass; there are two windows by C.E.Kempe, but far more impressive are the superb Arts & Crafts period windows in the north aisle by Archibald J. Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild, some of the very finest glass of it's date.

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