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Elizabethan Memorial Brass St Michael's at Ufton is a largely 14th/15th century building perched on a hilltop overlooking the Fosse Way. The nave has aisles on both sides, but that on the north is oddly shortened so that it appears more of a side chapel. Inside there is much early Victorian glass (most apparently by Hardmans and Chance, both of Birmingham) and a c1960 east window of the church's patron saint, Archangel Michael. The most notable ancient item is the small Elizabethan family brass on the south wall of the chancel . The church is normally kept locked and no longer supplies a keyholder notice (a tightening of the lock apparently in response to the recent spate of arson attacks in the area). It was pure luck that got me inside thanks to a local lady busy cleaning the church.
King Offa's Coffin, Offchurch Offchurch owes it's name to an association with Offa, king of Mercia, having reputedly founded the first church here. Fragments of an ancient stone coffin within the present building are believed to have belonged to his burial. The present St Gregory's church is an aiseless largely 12th century building (the windows mostly altered in the 14th century when the chancel was extended) with a 15th century tower. The interior is somewhat gloomy from the Victorian glass that filled every window, though a recently installed abstract window at the west end (by Roger Sargent who lives in the village) casts a serene blue light across the nave. Apart from the remains of Offa's coffin there are several minor wall tablets from the Baroque period.
Baroque Tablet Baroque tablet on the south side of the nave at Offchurch. Offchurch owes it's name to an association with Offa, king of Mercia, having reputedly founded the first church here. Fragments of an ancient stone coffin within the present building are believed to have belonged to his burial. The present St Gregory's church is an aiseless largely 12th century building (the windows mostly altered in the 14th century when the chancel was extended) with a 15th century tower. The interior is somewhat gloomy from the Victorian glass that filled every window, though a recently installed abstract window at the west end (by Roger Sargent who lives in the village) casts a serene blue light across the nave. Apart from the remains of Offa's coffin there are several minor wall tablets from the Baroque period.
Memorial Tablet St Mary's at Cubbington on the eastern fringe of Leamington Spa largely dates back to the 12th century, the tower and south nave arcade in particular being good examples of Norman work. The interior is somewhat dark owing to a profusion of Victorian stained glass windows. There is an interesting 17th century cartouche memorial attached to the wall adjoining the chancel arch.
14th Century Brass SS Peter & Paul at Deddington displays the warm toffee-colouring of north Oxfordshire's ironstone to good effect. The tower with it's gilt-weathervaned pinnacles is the main landmark of this small town. The main body of this very grand church dates mostly from the 13th and 14th centuries, but the tower and west end of the aisles were built after the original steeple collapsed in 1634. Rebuilding was interrupted by the Civil War and not completed untuil 1683-5. This 17th century work blends well with the medieval church, only in some of the carved details of doors and windows is the later date apparent. Statues of the church's patron saints were re-used on the west side (only their lower halfs are medieval). The spacious interior contains two medieval monuments and a curious north porch with a shallow gothic dome (part of the 17th century reconstruction). The most significant artworks are in stained glass; there are two windows by C.E.Kempe, but far more impressive are the superb Arts & Crafts period windows in the north aisle by Archibald J. Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild, some of the very finest glass of it's date. For more see below:- www.deddington.org.uk/history/churchesandchapels/jonesmem...
SS Peter & Paul at Deddington displays the warm toffee-colouring of north Oxfordshire's ironstone to good effect. The tower with it's gilt-weathervaned pinnacles is the main landmark of this small town. The main body of this very grand church dates mostly from the 13th and 14th centuries, but the tower and west end of the aisles were built after the original steeple collapsed in 1634. Rebuilding was interrupted by the Civil War and not completed untuil 1683-5. This 17th century work blends well with the medieval church, only in some of the carved details of doors and windows is the later date apparent. Statues of the church's patron saints were re-used on the west side (only their lower halfs are medieval). The spacious interior contains two medieval monuments and a curious north porch with a shallow gothic dome (part of the 17th century reconstruction). The most significant artworks are in stained glass; there are two windows by C.E.Kempe, but far more impressive are the superb Arts & Crafts period windows in the north aisle by Archibald J. Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild, some of the very finest glass of it's date. For more see below:- www.deddington.org.uk/history/churchesandchapels/jonesmem...
Belchier Monument SS Peter & Paul at Deddington displays the warm toffee-colouring of north Oxfordshire's ironstone to good effect. The tower with it's gilt-weathervaned pinnacles is the main landmark of this small town. The main body of this very grand church dates mostly from the 13th and 14th centuries, but the tower and west end of the aisles were built after the original steeple collapsed in 1634. Rebuilding was interrupted by the Civil War and not completed untuil 1683-5. This 17th century work blends well with the medieval church, only in some of the carved details of doors and windows is the later date apparent. Statues of the church's patron saints were re-used on the west side (only their lower halfs are medieval). The spacious interior contains two medieval monuments and a curious north porch with a shallow gothic dome (part of the 17th century reconstruction). The most significant artworks are in stained glass; there are two windows by C.E.Kempe, but far more impressive are the superb Arts & Crafts period windows in the north aisle by Archibald J. Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild, some of the very finest glass of it's date. For more see below:- www.deddington.org.uk/history/churchesandchapels/jonesmem...
14th Century Judge SS Peter & Paul at Deddington displays the warm toffee-colouring of north Oxfordshire's ironstone to good effect. The tower with it's gilt-weathervaned pinnacles is the main landmark of this small town. The main body of this very grand church dates mostly from the 13th and 14th centuries, but the tower and west end of the aisles were built after the original steeple collapsed in 1634. Rebuilding was interrupted by the Civil War and not completed untuil 1683-5. This 17th century work blends well with the medieval church, only in some of the carved details of doors and windows is the later date apparent. Statues of the church's patron saints were re-used on the west side (only their lower halfs are medieval). The spacious interior contains two medieval monuments and a curious north porch with a shallow gothic dome (part of the 17th century reconstruction). The most significant artworks are in stained glass; there are two windows by C.E.Kempe, but far more impressive are the superb Arts & Crafts period windows in the north aisle by Archibald J. Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild, some of the very finest glass of it's date.
Earl of Derby Monument, Liverpool Cathedral One of the 16th Earl of Derby's heraldic beasts adorning his marble and bronze memorial in the south east transept of Liverpool's Anglican Cathedral.
Brydges Memorial, Tyberton Creepy cherub at the base of the Brydges Memorial, one of a group of four impressive wall monuments in the chancel of the Georgian church at Tyberton, Herefordshire.
Monument Medallion Part of one of the mostly concealed Verney monuments that remain in the disused chapel at Compton Verney. Compton Verney's Chapel was built in 1772 by Lancelot 'Capability' Brown to replace the medieval church that stood by the lake nearby. It has not been used for services since the Verney family left in 1921. Inside the rectangular room has plaster decoration influenced by Robert Adam's work. The main items of interest are the Verney monuments including a large centrally placed tomb with effigies of Sir Richard & wife by Nicholas Stone c1630. However given the long term disuse of the building most of the monuments have been boxed in for protection. They will remain hidden until funding is found to restore and re-open the chapel as part of the visitor attraction here, The 16th century glass once contained here was sold in the 1920s and is now in New York. Nobody seems to know what's become of the brasses. They may still be there under all the clutter that the building's mothballed state has generated. Compton Verney House stands in a beautiful setting overlooking a lake. The grounds were landscaped by Capability Brown who also built the chapel. The House itself is largely the work of Robert Adam, who in the 1760s who added extra ranges to an existing west range of 1714, From the early 20th century the house passed through various owners, and after requisitioning in World War II was never lived in again, and thus remained in a state of disuse, slowly falling apart, until rescued and converted into a highly successful art gallery in the 1990s. www.comptonverney.org.uk/?page=home The house is now almost fully restored and in use. The chapel however remains closed and awaits proper restoration.
Putto atop Concealed Monument Part of one of the mostly concealed Verney monuments that remain in the disused chapel at Compton Verney. Compton Verney's Chapel was built in 1772 by Lancelot 'Capability' Brown to replace the medieval church that stood by the lake nearby. It has not been used for services since the Verney family left in 1921. Inside the rectangular room has plaster decoration influenced by Robert Adam's work. The main items of interest are the Verney monuments including a large centrally placed tomb with effigies of Sir Richard & wife by Nicholas Stone c1630. However given the long term disuse of the building most of the monuments have been boxed in for protection. They will remain hidden until funding is found to restore and re-open the chapel as part of the visitor attraction here, The 16th century glass once contained here was sold in the 1920s and is now in New York. Nobody seems to know what's become of the brasses. They may still be there under all the clutter that the building's mothballed state has generated. Compton Verney House stands in a beautiful setting overlooking a lake. The grounds were landscaped by Capability Brown who also built the chapel. The House itself is largely the work of Robert Adam, who in the 1760s who added extra ranges to an existing west range of 1714, From the early 20th century the house passed through various owners, and after requisitioning in World War II was never lived in again, and thus remained in a state of disuse, slowly falling apart, until rescued and converted into a highly successful art gallery in the 1990s. www.comptonverney.org.uk/?page=home The house is now almost fully restored and in use. The chapel however remains closed and awaits proper restoration.
Wall Tablet Compton Verney's Chapel was built in 1772 by Lancelot 'Capability' Brown to replace the medieval church that stood by the lake nearby. It has not been used for services since the Verney family left in 1921. Inside the rectangular room has plaster decoration influenced by Robert Adam's work. The main items of interest are the Verney monuments including a large centrally placed tomb with effigies of Sir Richard & wife by Nicholas Stone c1630. However given the long term disuse of the building most of the monuments have been boxed in for protection. They will remain hidden until funding is found to restore and re-open the chapel as part of the visitor attraction here, The 16th century glass once contained here was sold in the 1920s and is now in New York. Nobody seems to know what's become of the brasses. They may still be there under all the clutter that the building's mothballed state has generated. Compton Verney House stands in a beautiful setting overlooking a lake. The grounds were landscaped by Capability Brown who also built the chapel. The House itself is largely the work of Robert Adam, who in the 1760s who added extra ranges to an existing west range of 1714, From the early 20th century the house passed through various owners, and after requisitioning in World War II was never lived in again, and thus remained in a state of disuse, slowly falling apart, until rescued and converted into a highly successful art gallery in the 1990s. www.comptonverney.org.uk/?page=home The house is now almost fully restored and in use. The chapel however remains closed and awaits proper restoration.
John Wagstaffe Memorial, Bishop's Tachbrook Monument on the south side of the sanctuary at Bishops Tachbrook commemorating John Wagstaffe (d.1681). St Chad's at Bishops Tachbrook dates largely from the Decorated and early Perpendicular periods, but is far older in origin with some traces of Norman work. It was restored in 1855 when the chancel was rebuilt. Inside the church has a fine set of Victorian windows by several different makers, including an early piece by Morris & Co and a fine east window by Heaton, Butler & Bayne commemorating Sir Charles Kingsley (author of 'The Water Babies') whose wife lived and died locally. There are also several wall monuments from the Baroque period, the most notable being that adorned with swags and putti commemorating Sir Thomas Wagstaffe. This fine church is normally kept locked outside of services.
Sir Thomas Wagstaffe Monument Monument on the south side of the sanctuary at Bishops Tachbrook commemorating Sir Thomas Wagstaffe (d.1708). St Chad's at Bishops Tachbrook dates largely from the Decorated and early Perpendicular periods, but is far older in origin with some traces of Norman work. It was restored in 1855 when the chancel was rebuilt. Inside the church has a fine set of Victorian windows by several different makers, including an early piece by Morris & Co and a fine east window by Heaton, Butler & Bayne commemorating Sir Charles Kingsley (author of 'The Water Babies') whose wife lived and died locally. There are also several wall monuments from the Baroque period, the most notable being that adorned with swags and putti commemorating Sir Thomas Wagstaffe. This fine church is normally kept locked outside of services.
Baroque Exuberance Monument on the south side of the sanctuary at Bishops Tachbrook commemorating Sir Thomas Wagstaffe (d.1708). St Chad's at Bishops Tachbrook dates largely from the Decorated and early Perpendicular periods, but is far older in origin with some traces of Norman work. It was restored in 1855 when the chancel was rebuilt. Inside the church has a fine set of Victorian windows by several different makers, including an early piece by Morris & Co and a fine east window by Heaton, Butler & Bayne commemorating Sir Charles Kingsley (author of 'The Water Babies') whose wife lived and died locally. There are also several wall monuments from the Baroque period, the most notable being that adorned with swags and putti commemorating Sir Thomas Wagstaffe. This fine church is normally kept locked outside of services.
Wagstaffe Monument Monument on the north side of the sanctuary at Bishops Tachbrook commemorating Comb Wagstaffe (d.1668). St Chad's at Bishops Tachbrook dates largely from the Decorated and early Perpendicular periods, but is far older in origin with some traces of Norman work. It was restored in 1855 when the chancel was rebuilt. Inside the church has a fine set of Victorian windows by several different makers, including an early piece by Morris & Co and a fine east window by Heaton, Butler & Bayne commemorating Sir Charles Kingsley (author of 'The Water Babies') whose wife lived and died locally. There are also several wall monuments from the Baroque period, the most notable being that adorned with swags and putti commemorating Sir Thomas Wagstaffe. This fine church is normally kept locked outside of services.
Comb Wagstaffe Monument Monument on the north side of the sanctuary at Bishops Tachbrook commemorating Comb Wagstaffe (d.1668). St Chad's at Bishops Tachbrook dates largely from the Decorated and early Perpendicular periods, but is far older in origin with some traces of Norman work. It was restored in 1855 when the chancel was rebuilt. Inside the church has a fine set of Victorian windows by several different makers, including an early piece by Morris & Co and a fine east window by Heaton, Butler & Bayne commemorating Sir Charles Kingsley (author of 'The Water Babies') whose wife lived and died locally. There are also several wall monuments from the Baroque period, the most notable being that adorned with swags and putti commemorating Sir Thomas Wagstaffe. This fine church is normally kept locked outside of services.
Edward Peyto Detail of monument to Edward Peyto (d.1643) and his wife, apparently by Nicholas Stone's son John, 1643. St Giles is a long low building mostly dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. It's interior has a tunnel-like effect, there being little structural difference between nave and chancel, all one long chamber without aisles, separated only by a modest screen. It's most important features are the group of monuments at the west end of the nave, all to members of the Peyto family, builders of the renowned windmill nearby, and former occupants of the now vanished mansion that stood immediately north of the church (built 1650-60, demolished 1802; only an impressive gateway arch remains).
Lady Peyto Detail of monument to Edward Peyto (d.1643) and his wife, apparently by Nicholas Stone's son John, 1643. St Giles is a long low building mostly dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. It's interior has a tunnel-like effect, there being little structural difference between nave and chancel, all one long chamber without aisles, separated only by a modest screen. It's most important features are the group of monuments at the west end of the nave, all to members of the Peyto family, builders of the renowned windmill nearby, and former occupants of the now vanished mansion that stood immediately north of the church (built 1650-60, demolished 1802; only an impressive gateway arch remains).
Lady Peyto Detail of monument to William Peyto (d.1619) and his wife (d.1636) by Nicholas Stone 1639. St Giles is a long low building mostly dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. It's interior has a tunnel-like effect, there being little structural difference between nave and chancel, all one long chamber without aisles, separated only by a modest screen. It's most important features are the group of monuments at the west end of the nave, all to members of the Peyto family, builders of the renowned windmill nearby, and former occupants of the now vanished mansion that stood immediately north of the church (built 1650-60, demolished 1802; only an impressive gateway arch remains).
The Peytos at Prayer Alabaster tomb of Humphrey Peyto and wife c1585 (and somewhat overpowered by strong lighting here!), in the south west corner of Chesterton church. St Giles is a long low building mostly dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. It's interior has a tunnel-like effect, there being little structural difference between nave and chancel, all one long chamber without aisles, separated only by a modest screen. It's most important features are the group of monuments at the west end of the nave, all to members of the Peyto family, builders of the renowned windmill nearby, and former occupants of the now vanished mansion that stood immediately north of the church (built 1650-60, demolished 1802; only an impressive gateway arch remains).
Peyto Busts Detail of monument to Edward Peyto (d.1643) and his wife, apparently by Nicholas Stone's son John, 1643. St Giles is a long low building mostly dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. It's interior has a tunnel-like effect, there being little structural difference between nave and chancel, all one long chamber without aisles, separated only by a modest screen. It's most important features are the group of monuments at the west end of the nave, all to members of the Peyto family, builders of the renowned windmill nearby, and former occupants of the now vanished mansion that stood immediately north of the church (built 1650-60, demolished 1802; only an impressive gateway arch remains).
Edward Peyto Monument Monument to Edward Peyto (d.1643) and his wife, apparently by Nicholas Stone's son John, 1643. St Giles is a long low building mostly dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. It's interior has a tunnel-like effect, there being little structural difference between nave and chancel, all one long chamber without aisles, separated only by a modest screen. It's most important features are the group of monuments at the west end of the nave, all to members of the Peyto family, builders of the renowned windmill nearby, and former occupants of the now vanished mansion that stood immediately north of the church (built 1650-60, demolished 1802; only an impressive gateway arch remains).
William Peyto Monument Monument to William Peyto (d.1619) and his wife (d.1636) by Nicholas Stone 1639. St Giles is a long low building mostly dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. It's interior has a tunnel-like effect, there being little structural difference between nave and chancel, all one long chamber without aisles, separated only by a modest screen. It's most important features are the group of monuments at the west end of the nave, all to members of the Peyto family, builders of the renowned windmill nearby, and former occupants of the now vanished mansion that stood immediately north of the church (built 1650-60, demolished 1802; only an impressive gateway arch remains).
Humphrey Peyto Tomb Alabaster tomb of Humphrey Peyto and wife c1585 (and somewhat overpowered by strong lighting here!), in the south west corner of Chesterton church. St Giles is a long low building mostly dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. It's interior has a tunnel-like effect, there being little structural difference between nave and chancel, all one long chamber without aisles, separated only by a modest screen. It's most important features are the group of monuments at the west end of the nave, all to members of the Peyto family, builders of the renowned windmill nearby, and former occupants of the now vanished mansion that stood immediately north of the church (built 1650-60, demolished 1802; only an impressive gateway arch remains).
Sir Thomas Lucy Tomb St Leonard's church stands close to the main entrance to Charlecote Park and contains 16th and 17th century monuments to it's builders and residents, the Lucy family in the north chapel. The church itself is an entirely Victorian building dating from 1851-3 designed by John Gibson. The interior is somewhat dark (with much Victorian glass) and unusually the entire length of nave and chancel is finished with a stone-vaulted ceiling.
Sir Thomas on Horseback St Leonard's church stands close to the main entrance to Charlecote Park and contains 16th and 17th century monuments to it's builders and residents, the Lucy family in the north chapel. The church itself is an entirely Victorian building dating from 1851-3 designed by John Gibson. The interior is somewhat dark (with much Victorian glass) and unusually the entire length of nave and chancel is finished with a stone-vaulted ceiling.
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Knight's Effigy A late 15th century alabaster effigy of an unknown knight on the north side of the chancel at Wootton Wawen. St Peter's at Wootton Wawen is one of Warwickshire's oldest churches, the lower half of the tower being a fairly complete structure from the 9th century. Beyond the Saxon core much of the present building owes it's present appearance to 14th and 15th century Perpendicular enlargement and remodellibng. Inside the east end of the nave comes as a bit of a shock as the Saxon arches beneath the tower are tiny, leaving an almost blank wall with barely a glimpse of the chancel beyond as the focal point. There are fiagments of medieval glass, 15th century parclose screens and several fine monuments of various dates amongst the antiquities of this church.
Knight's Tomb A late 15th century alabaster effigy of an unknown knight on the north side of the chancel at Wootton Wawen. St Peter's at Wootton Wawen is one of Warwickshire's oldest churches, the lower half of the tower being a fairly complete structure from the 9th century. Beyond the Saxon core much of the present building owes it's present appearance to 14th and 15th century Perpendicular enlargement and remodellibng. Inside the east end of the nave comes as a bit of a shock as the Saxon arches beneath the tower are tiny, leaving an almost blank wall with barely a glimpse of the chancel beyond as the focal point. There are fiagments of medieval glass, 15th century parclose screens and several fine monuments of various dates amongst the antiquities of this church.
Harewell Brasses Tomb bearing the brasses of John Harewell (died 1505), his wife and children in the north east corner of the chancel at Wootton Wawen. St Peter's at Wootton Wawen is one of Warwickshire's oldest churches, the lower half of the tower being a fairly complete structure from the 9th century. Beyond the Saxon core much of the present building owes it's present appearance to 14th and 15th century Perpendicular enlargement and remodellibng. Inside the east end of the nave comes as a bit of a shock as the Saxon arches beneath the tower are tiny, leaving an almost blank wall with barely a glimpse of the chancel beyond as the focal point. There are fiagments of medieval glass, 15th century parclose screens and several fine monuments of various dates amongst the antiquities of this church.
John Harewell's Tomb Chest Tomb bearing the brasses of John Harewell (died 1505), his wife and children in the north east corner of the chancel at Wootton Wawen. St Peter's at Wootton Wawen is one of Warwickshire's oldest churches, the lower half of the tower being a fairly complete structure from the 9th century. Beyond the Saxon core much of the present building owes it's present appearance to 14th and 15th century Perpendicular enlargement and remodellibng. Inside the east end of the nave comes as a bit of a shock as the Saxon arches beneath the tower are tiny, leaving an almost blank wall with barely a glimpse of the chancel beyond as the focal point. There are fiagments of medieval glass, 15th century parclose screens and several fine monuments of various dates amongst the antiquities of this church.
Henry Knight's Monument This imposing monument comemorates Henry Knight and other family members and dates from 1764; unfortunately it's impact is somewhat diminished by the display boards that crowd this arwa of the church.
Francis Smith Effigy Monument to Francis Smith dating from c1605 in the south chapel at Wootton Wawen church. St Peter's at Wootton Wawen is one of Warwickshire's oldest churches, the lower half of the tower being a fairly complete structure from the 9th century. Beyond the Saxon core much of the present building owes it's present appearance to 14th and 15th century Perpendicular enlargement and remodellibng. Inside the east end of the nave comes as a bit of a shock as the Saxon arches beneath the tower are tiny, leaving an almost blank wall with barely a glimpse of the chancel beyond as the focal point. There are fiagments of medieval glass, 15th century parclose screens and several fine monuments of various dates amongst the antiquities of this church.
Smith Monument, Wootton Wawen Monument to Francis Smith dating from c1605 in the south chapel at Wootton Wawen church. St Peter's at Wootton Wawen is one of Warwickshire's oldest churches, the lower half of the tower being a fairly complete structure from the 9th century. Beyond the Saxon core much of the present building owes it's present appearance to 14th and 15th century Perpendicular enlargement and remodellibng. Inside the east end of the nave comes as a bit of a shock as the Saxon arches beneath the tower are tiny, leaving an almost blank wall with barely a glimpse of the chancel beyond as the focal point. There are fiagments of medieval glass, 15th century parclose screens and several fine monuments of various dates amongst the antiquities of this church.
Painted Jacobean Memorial St Nicholas's in Alcester has the grandeur befitting the main church of a small town, but all that survives of the medieval building is the tall west tower, the rest was rebuilt in the Georgian period in a strange fusion of gothic (exterior) and classical (interior) by Thomas Woodward of Chipping Campden in 1729-30. There was further alteration when Frederick Preedy rebuilt the chancel in 1870-1 and inserted the tracery in the nave windows, which gives the main body of the church a more Victorianised appearance. Inside the nave retains it's plain classical columns and flat plaster ceiling and is somewhat austere, relieved by the central chandelier suspended from a gilt cherub. The most remarkable feature is the late Tudor tomb of Sir Fulke Greville and his wife in the north aisle from 1559. The deceased are represented by recumbent effigies with many children portrayed on the sides of the tomb chest below, all in a good state of preservation with what appears to be original colouring. There is also a fine monument by Sir Francis Chantrey to the 1st Marquis of Hertford in the south transept from 1828 with a reclining effigy. There is fairly ordinary Victorian stained glass in the chancel, the church's best window is a modern piece from 1997 by Alan Younger in the south aisle.
Sir Hamilton Seymour St Nicholas's in Alcester has the grandeur befitting the main church of a small town, but all that survives of the medieval building is the tall west tower, the rest was rebuilt in the Georgian period in a strange fusion of gothic (exterior) and classical (interior) by Thomas Woodward of Chipping Campden in 1729-30. There was further alteration when Frederick Preedy rebuilt the chancel in 1870-1 and inserted the tracery in the nave windows, which gives the main body of the church a more Victorianised appearance. Inside the nave retains it's plain classical columns and flat plaster ceiling and is somewhat austere, relieved by the central chandelier suspended from a gilt cherub. The most remarkable feature is the late Tudor tomb of Sir Fulke Greville and his wife in the north aisle from 1559. The deceased are represented by recumbent effigies with many children portrayed on the sides of the tomb chest below, all in a good state of preservation with what appears to be original colouring. There is also a fine monument by Sir Francis Chantrey to the 1st Marquis of Hertford in the south transept from 1828 with a reclining effigy. There is fairly ordinary Victorian stained glass in the chancel, the church's best window is a modern piece from 1997 by Alan Younger in the south aisle.
Lady & Sir Fulke Greville St Nicholas's in Alcester has the grandeur befitting the main church of a small town, but all that survives of the medieval building is the tall west tower, the rest was rebuilt in the Georgian period in a strange fusion of gothic (exterior) and classical (interior) by Thomas Woodward of Chipping Campden in 1729-30. There was further alteration when Frederick Preedy rebuilt the chancel in 1870-1 and inserted the tracery in the nave windows, which gives the main body of the church a more Victorianised appearance. Inside the nave retains it's plain classical columns and flat plaster ceiling and is somewhat austere, relieved by the central chandelier suspended from a gilt cherub. The most remarkable feature is the late Tudor tomb of Sir Fulke Greville and his wife in the north aisle from 1559. The deceased are represented by recumbent effigies with many children portrayed on the sides of the tomb chest below, all in a good state of preservation with what appears to be original colouring. There is also a fine monument by Sir Francis Chantrey to the 1st Marquis of Hertford in the south transept from 1828 with a reclining effigy. There is fairly ordinary Victorian stained glass in the chancel, the church's best window is a modern piece from 1997 by Alan Younger in the south aisle.
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