Вход в личный кабинет
Логин (не зарегистрированы?):
Пароль (забыли?):
Также можно войти, используя:
Google Яндекс Yahoo
Войти

Фото, сделанные другими фотоаппаратами OLYMPUS:

Список всех фотокамер →

Фото, сделанные u20D,S400D,u400D (OLYMPUS)

Buddhist Store, Bangkok One of the best places in Bangkok to buy Buddhist statuary from.
Medieval Stone Coffins, Coventry Cathedral Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawrence Lee of the Royal College of Art along with Keith New and Geoffrey Clarke (each artist designed three of the windows individually and all collaborated on the last). The cathedral still dazzles the visitor with the boldness of it's vision, but alas, half a century on, it was not a vision to be repeated and few of the churches and cathedrals built since can claim to have embraced the synthesis of art and architecture in the way Basil Spence did at Coventry. The cathedral is ge
Hopkins Tomb, Old Coventry Cathedral Damaged monument to Richard Hopkins (d.1707) in the former St Thomas's (Capper's) Chapel. It blocks the former east doorway into the south porch. The scar on the wall above suggests the tapering coloured marble slab, a typical Baroque feature, which once rose 15ft high and was adorned with three busts of the deceased and his family, sadly destroyed in the bombing.
Hopkins Monument, Old Coventry Cathedral Damaged monument to Richard Hopkins (d.1707) in the former St Thomas's (Capper's) Chapel. Originally erected on the north side of the apse, it blocks a former east doorway into the south porch. The scar on the wall above suggests the tapering dark marble slab, a typical Baroque feature, which once rose 15ft high and was adorned with three busts of the deceased and his family (the centremost set high on a plinth surmounting a small sarcophagus, that stood atop the remaining tomb chest), sadly destroyed in the bombing.
Damaged 17th Century Memorial, Old Coventry Cathedral Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawrence Lee of the Royal College of Art along with Keith New and Geoffrey Clarke (each artist designed three of the windows individually and all collaborated on the last). The cathedral still dazzles the visitor with the boldness of it's vision, but alas, half a century on, it was not a vision to be repeated and few of the churches and cathedrals built since can claim to have embraced the synthesis of art and architecture in the way Basil Spence did at Coventry. The cath
World War I Memorial, Old Coventry Cathedral Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawrence Lee of the Royal College of Art along with Keith New and Geoffrey Clarke (each artist designed three of the windows individually and all collaborated on the last). The cathedral still dazzles the visitor with the boldness of it's vision, but alas, half a century on, it was not a vision to be repeated and few of the churches and cathedrals built since can claim to have embraced the synthesis of art and architecture in the way Basil Spence did at Coventry. The cathedral is
Damaged 19th Century Memorial, Old Coventry Cathedral Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawrence Lee of the Royal College of Art along with Keith New and Geoffrey Clarke (each artist designed three of the windows individually and all collaborated on the last). The cathedral still dazzles the visitor with the boldness of it's vision, but alas, half a century on, it was not a vision to be repeated and few of the churches and cathedrals built since can claim to have embraced the synthesis of art and architecture in the way Basil Spence did at Coventry. The cath
Bridgeman & Samwell Monument, Old Coventry Cathedral Detail of the c1700 memorial to Dame Mary Bridgeman & Mrs Eliza Samwell in the Dyers Chapel within the ruins of the old Coventry Cathedral. This is the most complete of the monuments surviving in situ in the former St Michael's church (which was upgraded to cathedral status only 23 years before it's destruction in the 1940 Coventry Blitz) apart from the Bishop Yeatman Biggs effigy from the 1920s. Sadly the sculptures have begun to deteriorate badly in the last 15 years, the two portrait medallions of the deceased women survived the fire bombing intact, but their noses and lips were defaced in the early 1990s and have decayed further since. Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) re
Bridgeman & Samwell Monument, Old Coventry Cathedral The c1700 memorial to Dame Mary Bridgeman & Mrs Eliza Samwell in the Dyers Chapel within the ruins of the old Coventry Cathedral. This is the most complete of the monuments surviving in situ in the former St Michael's church (which was upgraded to cathedral status only 23 years before it's destruction in the 1940 Coventry Blitz) apart from the Bishop Yeatman Biggs effigy from the 1920s. Sadly the sculptures have begun to deteriorate badly in the last 15 years, the two portrait medallions of the deceased women survived the fire bombing intact, but their noses and lips were defaced in the early 1990s and have decayed further since. Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing
Damaged Victorian Memorial, Old Coventry Cathedral Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawrence Lee of the Royal College of Art along with Keith New and Geoffrey Clarke (each artist designed three of the windows individually and all collaborated on the last). The cathedral still dazzles the visitor with the boldness of it's vision, but alas, half a century on, it was not a vision to be repeated and few of the churches and cathedrals built since can claim to have embraced the synthesis of art and architecture in the way Basil Spence did at Coventry. The cathedr
Bishop Yeatman-Biggs Memorial, Old Coventry Cathedral Memorial of Bishop Yeatman Biggs, first bishop of te newly refounded Diocese of Coventry (d.1922). The bronze effigy by Sir John Hamo Thornycroft was the only one of the old St Michael's many monuments to survive the bombing more or less intact. (It remains unclear what fragments survived in the debris of the important Tudor Nethermyll and Swillington tombs or what was done with them; old photos suggest something of the latter survived but no trace remains today). Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawre
Old Coventry Cathedral in Miniature Detail of the memorial of Bishop Yeatman Biggs, first bishop of te newly refounded Diocese of Coventry (d.1922). The bronze effigy by Sir John Hamo Thornycroft was the only one of the old St Michael's many monuments to survive the bombing more or less intact. (It remains unclear what fragments survived in the debris of the important Tudor Nethermyll and Swillington tombs or what was done with them; old photos suggest something of the latter survived but no trace remains today). Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawrence
Bishop Yeatman-Biggs Memorial, Old Coventry Cathedral Memorial of Bishop Yeatman Biggs, first bishop of te newly refounded Diocese of Coventry (d.1922). The bronze effigy by Sir John Hamo Thornycroft was the only one of the old St Michael's many monuments to survive the bombing more or less intact. (It remains unclear what fragments survived in the debris of the important Tudor Nethermyll and Swillington tombs or what was done with them; old photos suggest something of the latter survived but no trace remains today). Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawrenc
Sanders Monument, Mongewell Located in an idylic riverside setting, St John the Baptist in Mongewell has faced a long decline following redundancy in the early 20th century, which has left the nave as a most picturesque romantic ruin. The church was formally Norman (as echoed by the very restored apse) but was mostly remodelled in 1791 when an unusual apsed west end with a polygonal turret were added. After a long dereliction the nave roof collapsed in the 1940s, resulting in the present partition blocking the chancel arch, separating the surviving chancel from the ruined nave. The chancel now contains the font and monuments, formerly located at the west end of the nave, to preserve them from the elements. The font is neo-Norman Victoriana whilst the monuments are finer Baroque pieces, one a tablet with busts to Edmund Madock and his wife from 1692 and the larger one a sarcophagus with a finely sculpted effigy in a turban of John Sanders from 1731. The church is now vested in the Churches Conservation Trust; a key is available for access to the interior of the chancel.
John Sanders Monument, Mongewell Located in an idylic riverside setting, St John the Baptist in Mongewell has faced a long decline following redundancy in the early 20th century, which has left the nave as a most picturesque romantic ruin. The church was formally Norman (as echoed by the very restored apse) but was mostly remodelled in 1791 when an unusual apsed west end with a polygonal turret were added. After a long dereliction the nave roof collapsed in the 1940s, resulting in the present partition blocking the chancel arch, separating the surviving chancel from the ruined nave. The chancel now contains the font and monuments, formerly located at the west end of the nave, to preserve them from the elements. The font is neo-Norman Victoriana whilst the monuments are finer Baroque pieces, one a tablet with busts to Edmund Madock and his wife from 1692 and the larger one a sarcophagus with a finely sculpted effigy in a turban of John Sanders from 1731. The church is now vested in the Churches Conservation Trust; a key is available for access to the interior of the chancel.
Sanders Monument, Mongewell Located in an idylic riverside setting, St John the Baptist in Mongewell has faced a long decline following redundancy in the early 20th century, which has left the nave as a most picturesque romantic ruin. The church was formally Norman (as echoed by the very restored apse) but was mostly remodelled in 1791 when an unusual apsed west end with a polygonal turret were added. After a long dereliction the nave roof collapsed in the 1940s, resulting in the present partition blocking the chancel arch, separating the surviving chancel from the ruined nave. The chancel now contains the font and monuments, formerly located at the west end of the nave, to preserve them from the elements. The font is neo-Norman Victoriana whilst the monuments are finer Baroque pieces, one a tablet with busts to Edmund Madock and his wife from 1692 and the larger one a sarcophagus with a finely sculpted effigy in a turban of John Sanders from 1731. The church is now vested in the Churches Conservation Trust; a key is available for access to the interior of the chancel.
John Sanders Monument, Mongewell Located in an idylic riverside setting, St John the Baptist in Mongewell has faced a long decline following redundancy in the early 20th century, which has left the nave as a most picturesque romantic ruin. The church was formally Norman (as echoed by the very restored apse) but was mostly remodelled in 1791 when an unusual apsed west end with a polygonal turret were added. After a long dereliction the nave roof collapsed in the 1940s, resulting in the present partition blocking the chancel arch, separating the surviving chancel from the ruined nave. The chancel now contains the font and monuments, formerly located at the west end of the nave, to preserve them from the elements. The font is neo-Norman Victoriana whilst the monuments are finer Baroque pieces, one a tablet with busts to Edmund Madock and his wife from 1692 and the larger one a sarcophagus with a finely sculpted effigy in a turban of John Sanders from 1731. The church is now vested in the Churches Conservation Trust; a key is available for access to the interior of the chancel.
Edmund Madock Monument, Mongewell Located in an idylic riverside setting, St John the Baptist in Mongewell has faced a long decline following redundancy in the early 20th century, which has left the nave as a most picturesque romantic ruin. The church was formally Norman (as echoed by the very restored apse) but was mostly remodelled in 1791 when an unusual apsed west end with a polygonal turret were added. After a long dereliction the nave roof collapsed in the 1940s, resulting in the present partition blocking the chancel arch, separating the surviving chancel from the ruined nave. The chancel now contains the font and monuments, formerly located at the west end of the nave, to preserve them from the elements. The font is neo-Norman Victoriana whilst the monuments are finer Baroque pieces, one a tablet with busts to Edmund Madock and his wife from 1692 and the larger one a sarcophagus with a finely sculpted effigy in a turban of John Sanders from 1731. The church is now vested in the Churches Conservation Trust; a key is available for access to the interior of the chancel.
Monument, Checkendon SS Peter & Paul at Checkendon is a real gem dating back to Norman times, as witnessed by the surviving apse and herringbone masonry of the flint walls. There are of course later alterations with the 15th century tower and nave windows and roof, but the chancel remains little altered in form. There is further Norman work in the carved capitals of the porch and chancel but the most striking survival inside is the 13th century mural decoration of the apse, retaining complete near-monochrome figures of Christ enthroned flanked by Apostles (Peter & Paul given more prominence in niches). Some of the figures on the south side were doubtless removed when the window was enlarged. There are further mural fragments on the north side of the chancel with a scene of knights on horseback. Nearby are several fine monuments, 15th century brasses (including a unique figure of a soul held aloft by angels) and 17th century and later sculpted wall tablets. In the nave it is the modern glass in three windows that draws the eye, the earliest being engraved glass by Laurence Whistler from 1960, facing a serenely beautiful John Hayward window from 1987. Further west is a more geometric and recent work by Debora Coombs.
Beauchamp's Soul Brass, Checkendon SS Peter & Paul at Checkendon is a real gem dating back to Norman times, as witnessed by the surviving apse and herringbone masonry of the flint walls. There are of course later alterations with the 15th century tower and nave windows and roof, but the chancel remains little altered in form. There is further Norman work in the carved capitals of the porch and chancel but the most striking survival inside is the 13th century mural decoration of the apse, retaining complete near-monochrome figures of Christ enthroned flanked by Apostles (Peter & Paul given more prominence in niches). Some of the figures on the south side were doubtless removed when the window was enlarged. There are further mural fragments on the north side of the chancel with a scene of knights on horseback. Nearby are several fine monuments, 15th century brasses (including a unique figure of a soul held aloft by angels) and 17th century and later sculpted wall tablets. In the nave it is the modern glass in three windows that draws the eye, the earliest being engraved glass by Laurence Whistler from 1960, facing a serenely beautiful John Hayward window from 1987. Further west is a more geometric and recent work by Debora Coombs.
Bikes & Buddhas, Bangkok Buddha images randomly placed behind a Buddhist store in central Bangkok.
Giant Swing, Bangkok In front of the Wat Suthat Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
Giant Swing & Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Buddha, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Mini Pagodas, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Buddha Gallery, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Gilded Buddhas, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Bronze Horse, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Elephant Plinth, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Creepy Face, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Buddhas, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Buddha Gallery, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Buddha, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Gilded Gable, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Naga, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Naga, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Garuda, Wat Suthat, Bangkok Wat Suthat is one of Bangkok's oldest and largest temples, having been built between the 1780s and 1820s. The complex consists of an impressive wihan (prayer hall) within a courtyard surrounded by a cloister containing many seated Buddha sculptures (as at Wat Pho). The wihan contains a large gilded Buddha and fine frescoes, but in common with the other temples we visited this day we didn't get any more than a glimpse of the interior as prayer sessions for the festival of Loi Kratong were in flow. The complex also has many interesting sculptures dotted about, including some elegant bronze horses, chinese figures and the most ridiculous looking farang ('foreigner' ,ie European) statues we saw (caricatures of 19th century British or French soldiers). In front of the Temple complex is a tapering wooden archway, all that remains of the 'great swing' from which terrifyingly dangerous rituals were performed in mid air at certain religious festivals in the 19th and early 20th centuries. www.sacred-destinations.com/thailand/bangkok-wat-suthat-a... bangkokforvisitors.com/suthat.html
Wat Ratchabophit Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11      

← Назад

@VFL_RU Uptime по данным Ping-Admin.Ru - сервиса мониторинга доступности сайтов
Версия для мобильных устройств.
Концепция, программирование и дизайн проекта — «Седжин».
© VFL.RU 2001–2020