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Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Gilded Relief, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Ornate Doorway, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Ornate Doorway, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Main Stupa, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Decorative Finish, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Elephants, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Khmer Chedi, Royal Cemetery, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Gothic Steeple, Royal Cemetery, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Neo-Baroque Tower, Royal Cemetery, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Golden Chedi, Royal Cemetery, Wat Ratchabophit, Bangkok Wat Ratchabophit is one of the most unusual temples in Bangkok; built in the latter half of the 19th century it shows marked European influence in certain areas, such as the neo-gothic interior of the main bot (prayer hall) and many of the monuments in the adjoining Royal Cemetery, that includes a domed classical style tower and pinnacled gothic steeples amongst more traditional Thai and Khmer style structures. The centrepiece of the Temple is the huge tile-covered stupa that grows from the heart of the complex and is surrounded by a tight circular courtyard. The surrounding structures are richly decorated and gilded with typical Thai richness. The entrance gates to the temple compound have carved and painted door panels with bizarre figures that appear to be 'farang' (foreign/European) guards holding rifles! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Ratchabophit
Wat Rachapradit, Bangkok Wat Rachapradit is not one of Bangkok's larger or older temples, but is interesting stylistically for it's use of Khmer style motives in it's architecture. It is also unusually monochrome for a Thai temple, with a grey marble finish on the main stupa. The temple dates from c1860. bangkokforvisitors.com/ratanakosin/ratchapradit.html
Wat Ratchapradit, Bangkok Wat Rachapradit is not one of Bangkok's larger or older temples, but is interesting stylistically for it's use of Khmer style motives in it's architecture. It is also unusually monochrome for a Thai temple, with a grey marble finish on the main stupa. The temple dates from c1860. bangkokforvisitors.com/ratanakosin/ratchapradit.html
Wat Rachapradit, Bangkok Wat Rachapradit is not one of Bangkok's larger or older temples, but is interesting stylistically for it's use of Khmer style motives in it's architecture. It is also unusually monochrome for a Thai temple, with a grey marble finish on the main stupa. The temple dates from c1860. bangkokforvisitors.com/ratanakosin/ratchapradit.html
Khmer Style Shrine, Wat Rachapradit, Bangkok Wat Rachapradit is not one of Bangkok's larger or older temples, but is interesting stylistically for it's use of Khmer style motives in it's architecture. It is also unusually monochrome for a Thai temple, with a grey marble finish on the main stupa. The temple dates from c1860. bangkokforvisitors.com/ratanakosin/ratchapradit.html
Grey Stupa, Wat Rachapradit, Bangkok Wat Rachapradit is not one of Bangkok's larger or older temples, but is interesting stylistically for it's use of Khmer style motives in it's architecture. It is also unusually monochrome for a Thai temple, with a grey marble finish on the main stupa. The temple dates from c1860. bangkokforvisitors.com/ratanakosin/ratchapradit.html
Wat Rachapradit, Bangkok Wat Rachapradit is not one of Bangkok's larger or older temples, but is interesting stylistically for it's use of Khmer style motives in it's architecture. It is also unusually monochrome for a Thai temple, with a grey marble finish on the main stupa. The temple dates from c1860.
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Memorial, King's Norton St Nicholas's in King's Norton is one of the most impressive medieval churches within the suburbs of present day Birmingham. It is distinguished by a lofty tower and spire of mid 15th century date (similar to that at Coleshill) which given the elevated site is a landmark visible for some distance. The bulk of the church building is of 15th century date though it is much earlier in origin, with remnants of the 12th century Norman building at the north east corner of the chancel (one window opening remains). The building has been restored and altered over the centuries following the Reformation, most noticeably in the south aisle where a new roof with series of gables with windows was added to admit greater light to the otherwise fairly dark interior. The church was restored in the 1880s by Ewan Christian. Inside the furnishings are mostly Victorian except for the surviving lower part of the 15th century wooden rood screen with a carved foliate frieze. There is also a fine group of post-Reformation monuments which are somewhat hard to appreciate (and photograph!) in the gloomy space under the tower (where they were moved to from the chancel in the Victorian restoration). The church contains much Victorian stained glass, much of it by Hardman's of Birmingham, with an east window by the studio of C.E.Kempe. The church is normally kept locked but has select open hours on wednesdays and saturdays for visitors who are made very welcome! www.kingsnorton.org.uk/churches/st-nicolas-ancient-stones... The church forms a group of fine medieval buildings along with the Old Grammar School (in the churchyard) and the former Saracen's Head/Tudor Merchant's House which formed the winning project of the BBC's Restoration series in 2004.
Wall Tablet, King's Norton St Nicholas's in King's Norton is one of the most impressive medieval churches within the suburbs of present day Birmingham. It is distinguished by a lofty tower and spire of mid 15th century date (similar to that at Coleshill) which given the elevated site is a landmark visible for some distance. The bulk of the church building is of 15th century date though it is much earlier in origin, with remnants of the 12th century Norman building at the north east corner of the chancel (one window opening remains). The building has been restored and altered over the centuries following the Reformation, most noticeably in the south aisle where a new roof with series of gables with windows was added to admit greater light to the otherwise fairly dark interior. The church was restored in the 1880s by Ewan Christian. Inside the furnishings are mostly Victorian except for the surviving lower part of the 15th century wooden rood screen with a carved foliate frieze. There is also a fine group of post-Reformation monuments which are somewhat hard to appreciate (and photograph!) in the gloomy space under the tower (where they were moved to from the chancel in the Victorian restoration). The church contains much Victorian stained glass, much of it by Hardman's of Birmingham, with an east window by the studio of C.E.Kempe. The church is normally kept locked but has select open hours on wednesdays and saturdays for visitors who are made very welcome! www.kingsnorton.org.uk/churches/st-nicolas-ancient-stones... The church forms a group of fine medieval buildings along with the Old Grammar School (in the churchyard) and the former Saracen's Head/Tudor Merchant's House which formed the winning project of the BBC's Restoration series in 2004.
Bishop Goldwell's Tomb, Norwich Cathedral Norwich Cathedral is one of England's finest buildings and greatest cathedrals; It is one of the most complete examples of Romanesque architecture in the country (arguably the least altered Norman cathedral), has the second tallest spire in Britain and it's vaulted ceilings contain the largest collection of carved medieval roof bosses anywhere. Surprisingly for so grand a building it is relatively inconspicuous from the city itself, standing on low ground and concealed within the old Cathedral Close, an enclave of tradition and relative peace apart from the noise of the city beyond it's gates. It's monastic past is much in evidence, particularly the magnificent cloisters, the largest and some of the finest in the country. As stated most of the building dates from the 12th century and therefore exudes that solid Norman aesthetic, massively built but still graceful and beautiful. The central tower is unusually designed with arcading and windows beneath a double row of oculi, the tapering spire above it is a 15th century addition, aside from this the only major alterations to the ancient fabric externally are the tall 14th century clerestorey and flying buttresses of the choir and the gothic enlargement of various nave and aisle windows, principally the great perpendicular west window that takes up most of the west facade. The interior is predominantly Norman too, except for the elaborate gothic vaulted ceilings that cover nave, choir and both transepts with a uniform design (originally these higher celings would have been of wood, stone vaults were added in the late medieval period to protect against fire, a job they performed well when the transept roofs were hit by incendiary bombs in World War II). These vaults display an unrivalled collection of narrative roof bosses, carved and coloured with Old & New Testament scenes (mainly in the nave and transepts, the choir bosses are mostly decorated with the emblem of their donor, Bishop Goldwell). The cathedral has surprisingly few major monuments and sculptures compared to most of it's peers, but does have more exceptional medieval art in it's 14th & 15th century painted altarpieces, the most important being the Despenser Retable in the south east chapel, a unique survivial, hidden from danger during the Reformation & Civil War by being converted to the underside of a table. Further altarpieces here are formed of salvaged panels from redundant city churches. The medieval choir stalls also survive with a full set of carved misericords. The stained glass by contrast is mostly Victorian and quite mixed (very little medieval glass survives). Striking modern glass by Keith New and John Hayward was installed in the north transept to commemorate the Millennium. The cloisters to the south of the nave are one of my favourite places, all four walks are covered by yet more vaulted ceilings with over 400 more carved and repainted bosses (lower down and much easier to study than those inside the main body of the cathedral) spanning the long period of the cloister's construction throughout the 14th & !5th centuries. Norwich Cathedral is special to me as being the subject of my earliest memories, recalling having been taken around the cathedral and cloisters as a 3 year old, which left a vivid impression on me and lead me to pursue an interest in church art and architecture years later, ultimately towards my present career in stained glass. Norwich Cathedral will always therefore have a touch of that nostalgic magic to me. For more details see the Cathedral website below:- www.cathedral.org.uk/historyheritage/Default.aspx For more images and details see Simon Knott's entry on his Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichcathedral/norwichcathedr...
Kneeling Lady, Norwich Cathedral Norwich Cathedral is one of England's finest buildings and greatest cathedrals; It is one of the most complete examples of Romanesque architecture in the country (arguably the least altered Norman cathedral), has the second tallest spire in Britain and it's vaulted ceilings contain the largest collection of carved medieval roof bosses anywhere. Surprisingly for so grand a building it is relatively inconspicuous from the city itself, standing on low ground and concealed within the old Cathedral Close, an enclave of tradition and relative peace apart from the noise of the city beyond it's gates. It's monastic past is much in evidence, particularly the magnificent cloisters, the largest and some of the finest in the country. As stated most of the building dates from the 12th century and therefore exudes that solid Norman aesthetic, massively built but still graceful and beautiful. The central tower is unusually designed with arcading and windows beneath a double row of oculi, the tapering spire above it is a 15th century addition, aside from this the only major alterations to the ancient fabric externally are the tall 14th century clerestorey and flying buttresses of the choir and the gothic enlargement of various nave and aisle windows, principally the great perpendicular west window that takes up most of the west facade. The interior is predominantly Norman too, except for the elaborate gothic vaulted ceilings that cover nave, choir and both transepts with a uniform design (originally these higher celings would have been of wood, stone vaults were added in the late medieval period to protect against fire, a job they performed well when the transept roofs were hit by incendiary bombs in World War II). These vaults display an unrivalled collection of narrative roof bosses, carved and coloured with Old & New Testament scenes (mainly in the nave and transepts, the choir bosses are mostly decorated with the emblem of their donor, Bishop Goldwell). The cathedral has surprisingly few major monuments and sculptures compared to most of it's peers, but does have more exceptional medieval art in it's 14th & 15th century painted altarpieces, the most important being the Despenser Retable in the south east chapel, a unique survivial, hidden from danger during the Reformation & Civil War by being converted to the underside of a table. Further altarpieces here are formed of salvaged panels from redundant city churches. The medieval choir stalls also survive with a full set of carved misericords. The stained glass by contrast is mostly Victorian and quite mixed (very little medieval glass survives). Striking modern glass by Keith New and John Hayward was installed in the north transept to commemorate the Millennium. The cloisters to the south of the nave are one of my favourite places, all four walks are covered by yet more vaulted ceilings with over 400 more carved and repainted bosses (lower down and much easier to study than those inside the main body of the cathedral) spanning the long period of the cloister's construction throughout the 14th & !5th centuries. Norwich Cathedral is special to me as being the subject of my earliest memories, recalling having been taken around the cathedral and cloisters as a 3 year old, which left a vivid impression on me and lead me to pursue an interest in church art and architecture years later, ultimately towards my present career in stained glass. Norwich Cathedral will always therefore have a touch of that nostalgic magic to me. For more details see the Cathedral website below:- www.cathedral.org.uk/historyheritage/Default.aspx For more images and details see Simon Knott's entry on his Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichcathedral/norwichcathedr...
Baroque Memorial, Norwich Cathedral Norwich Cathedral is one of England's finest buildings and greatest cathedrals; It is one of the most complete examples of Romanesque architecture in the country (arguably the least altered Norman cathedral), has the second tallest spire in Britain and it's vaulted ceilings contain the largest collection of carved medieval roof bosses anywhere. Surprisingly for so grand a building it is relatively inconspicuous from the city itself, standing on low ground and concealed within the old Cathedral Close, an enclave of tradition and relative peace apart from the noise of the city beyond it's gates. It's monastic past is much in evidence, particularly the magnificent cloisters, the largest and some of the finest in the country. As stated most of the building dates from the 12th century and therefore exudes that solid Norman aesthetic, massively built but still graceful and beautiful. The central tower is unusually designed with arcading and windows beneath a double row of oculi, the tapering spire above it is a 15th century addition, aside from this the only major alterations to the ancient fabric externally are the tall 14th century clerestorey and flying buttresses of the choir and the gothic enlargement of various nave and aisle windows, principally the great perpendicular west window that takes up most of the west facade. The interior is predominantly Norman too, except for the elaborate gothic vaulted ceilings that cover nave, choir and both transepts with a uniform design (originally these higher celings would have been of wood, stone vaults were added in the late medieval period to protect against fire, a job they performed well when the transept roofs were hit by incendiary bombs in World War II). These vaults display an unrivalled collection of narrative roof bosses, carved and coloured with Old & New Testament scenes (mainly in the nave and transepts, the choir bosses are mostly decorated with the emblem of their donor, Bishop Goldwell). The cathedral has surprisingly few major monuments and sculptures compared to most of it's peers, but does have more exceptional medieval art in it's 14th & 15th century painted altarpieces, the most important being the Despenser Retable in the south east chapel, a unique survivial, hidden from danger during the Reformation & Civil War by being converted to the underside of a table. Further altarpieces here are formed of salvaged panels from redundant city churches. The medieval choir stalls also survive with a full set of carved misericords. The stained glass by contrast is mostly Victorian and quite mixed (very little medieval glass survives). Striking modern glass by Keith New and John Hayward was installed in the north transept to commemorate the Millennium. The cloisters to the south of the nave are one of my favourite places, all four walks are covered by yet more vaulted ceilings with over 400 more carved and repainted bosses (lower down and much easier to study than those inside the main body of the cathedral) spanning the long period of the cloister's construction throughout the 14th & !5th centuries. Norwich Cathedral is special to me as being the subject of my earliest memories, recalling having been taken around the cathedral and cloisters as a 3 year old, which left a vivid impression on me and lead me to pursue an interest in church art and architecture years later, ultimately towards my present career in stained glass. Norwich Cathedral will always therefore have a touch of that nostalgic magic to me. For more details see the Cathedral website below:- www.cathedral.org.uk/historyheritage/Default.aspx For more images and details see Simon Knott's entry on his Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichcathedral/norwichcathedr...
Elizabethan Tomb, Norwich Cathedral Norwich Cathedral is one of England's finest buildings and greatest cathedrals; It is one of the most complete examples of Romanesque architecture in the country (arguably the least altered Norman cathedral), has the second tallest spire in Britain and it's vaulted ceilings contain the largest collection of carved medieval roof bosses anywhere. Surprisingly for so grand a building it is relatively inconspicuous from the city itself, standing on low ground and concealed within the old Cathedral Close, an enclave of tradition and relative peace apart from the noise of the city beyond it's gates. It's monastic past is much in evidence, particularly the magnificent cloisters, the largest and some of the finest in the country. As stated most of the building dates from the 12th century and therefore exudes that solid Norman aesthetic, massively built but still graceful and beautiful. The central tower is unusually designed with arcading and windows beneath a double row of oculi, the tapering spire above it is a 15th century addition, aside from this the only major alterations to the ancient fabric externally are the tall 14th century clerestorey and flying buttresses of the choir and the gothic enlargement of various nave and aisle windows, principally the great perpendicular west window that takes up most of the west facade. The interior is predominantly Norman too, except for the elaborate gothic vaulted ceilings that cover nave, choir and both transepts with a uniform design (originally these higher celings would have been of wood, stone vaults were added in the late medieval period to protect against fire, a job they performed well when the transept roofs were hit by incendiary bombs in World War II). These vaults display an unrivalled collection of narrative roof bosses, carved and coloured with Old & New Testament scenes (mainly in the nave and transepts, the choir bosses are mostly decorated with the emblem of their donor, Bishop Goldwell). The cathedral has surprisingly few major monuments and sculptures compared to most of it's peers, but does have more exceptional medieval art in it's 14th & 15th century painted altarpieces, the most important being the Despenser Retable in the south east chapel, a unique survivial, hidden from danger during the Reformation & Civil War by being converted to the underside of a table. Further altarpieces here are formed of salvaged panels from redundant city churches. The medieval choir stalls also survive with a full set of carved misericords. The stained glass by contrast is mostly Victorian and quite mixed (very little medieval glass survives). Striking modern glass by Keith New and John Hayward was installed in the north transept to commemorate the Millennium. The cloisters to the south of the nave are one of my favourite places, all four walks are covered by yet more vaulted ceilings with over 400 more carved and repainted bosses (lower down and much easier to study than those inside the main body of the cathedral) spanning the long period of the cloister's construction throughout the 14th & !5th centuries. Norwich Cathedral is special to me as being the subject of my earliest memories, recalling having been taken around the cathedral and cloisters as a 3 year old, which left a vivid impression on me and lead me to pursue an interest in church art and architecture years later, ultimately towards my present career in stained glass. Norwich Cathedral will always therefore have a touch of that nostalgic magic to me. For more details see the Cathedral website below:- www.cathedral.org.uk/historyheritage/Default.aspx For more images and details see Simon Knott's entry on his Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichcathedral/norwichcathedr...
Renaissance Tomb, St Martin at Palace Plain, Norwich St Martin at Palace Plain stands just to the north of Norwich Cathedral's precinct and opposite the Bishop's Palace. It consists of nave and chancel, both flanked by aisles/chapels and a west tower, all of which appear somewhat restored in the Victorian period (the church required heavy treatment after partial collapse of the tower in the 19th century). Like so many others it has been redundant for several decades and is now used as Norwich's Probation centre. As a result it isn't generally open to the public except for Heritage weekend, and has had substantial alteration inside, but this fortunately hasn't destroyed the unity of the interior. Inside there has been a new floor and office spaces inserted in the western half of the nave and glass screens in many of the arches to te aisles and chapels, now used as meeting rooms. There is alot of clutter, but considering the needs of this conversion somehow this doesn't overwhelm the place as much as you'd expect. The interior itself has a somewhat Victorian feel to it thanks to the heavy restoration. Obviously the old furnishings have been removed but a fine Renaissance mid 16th century monument survives in the former north chapel. The Victorian stained glass was largely lost to bombs in World War II but a couple of isolated figures survive and the east window has postwar glass presumably by Frederick Cole of the William Morris Studios, Westminster. For more information on this former church see Simon Knott's entry on his Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichmartinpalaceplain/norwic...
John Harvey Memorial, St Clement, Norwich St Clement in Colegate is another of Norwich's mostly 15th century churches, this time on a relatively modest scale with a simple two chamber interior, consisting of a wide nave nave and narrow chancel. At the west end is the tall and slender tower, similar to those at St John de Sepulchre and nearby St George's. Like the majority of the ancient city churches it was declared redundant in the 1970s but thanks to a determined Methodist minister it has remained open for private prayer and meditation ever since, unique amongst the city's redundant churches in being open daily, and with all it's furnishings still in place; this church feels like nothing has changed since it's day's serving a parish. The furnishings themselves date mostly to the early 19th century, apart from the late medieval font at the west end. The most eye-catching features are the monuments, several large Baroque wall-tablets dominating the nave either side. There is also a medieval brass to a lady in the nave floor. For more read Simon Knott's article on huis superb Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichclement/norwichclement.htm
Jeremiah Ives Memorial, St Clement, Norwich St Clement in Colegate is another of Norwich's mostly 15th century churches, this time on a relatively modest scale with a simple two chamber interior, consisting of a wide nave nave and narrow chancel. At the west end is the tall and slender tower, similar to those at St John de Sepulchre and nearby St George's. Like the majority of the ancient city churches it was declared redundant in the 1970s but thanks to a determined Methodist minister it has remained open for private prayer and meditation ever since, unique amongst the city's redundant churches in being open daily, and with all it's furnishings still in place; this church feels like nothing has changed since it's day's serving a parish. The furnishings themselves date mostly to the early 19th century, apart from the late medieval font at the west end. The most eye-catching features are the monuments, several large Baroque wall-tablets dominating the nave either side. There is also a medieval brass to a lady in the nave floor. For more read Simon Knott's article on huis superb Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichclement/norwichclement.htm
Ives Memorial, St Clement, Norwich St Clement in Colegate is another of Norwich's mostly 15th century churches, this time on a relatively modest scale with a simple two chamber interior, consisting of a wide nave nave and narrow chancel. At the west end is the tall and slender tower, similar to those at St John de Sepulchre and nearby St George's. Like the majority of the ancient city churches it was declared redundant in the 1970s but thanks to a determined Methodist minister it has remained open for private prayer and meditation ever since, unique amongst the city's redundant churches in being open daily, and with all it's furnishings still in place; this church feels like nothing has changed since it's day's serving a parish. The furnishings themselves date mostly to the early 19th century, apart from the late medieval font at the west end. The most eye-catching features are the monuments, several large Baroque wall-tablets dominating the nave either side. There is also a medieval brass to a lady in the nave floor. For more read Simon Knott's article on huis superb Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichclement/norwichclement.htm
Jannys Tomb, St George Colegate St George Colegate is a rarity in this area of Norwich in that it remains as a working church. It is one of the most attractive and rewarding in the city. Again the building is almost entirely the product of the late 15th century with a soaring west tower, chancel and north chapel and nave flanked by aisles and with another fine clerestorey. The interior is a real gem as seems to have been left alone by Victorian restorers and thus retains it's Georgian furnishings giving it an atmosphere quite unlike the other city churches, and much the better for it. It is remarkable how well the 15th century gothic of the architecture and the 18th century Georgian furnishing complement each other, it's an interior that feels like a time-capsule, and is well cared for and obviously loved. There are some fine memorials here, several wall tablets in the aisle, and a fine Renaissance terracotta tomb chest in the north chapel to former Mayor Robert Jannys (d.1530) and nearby brasses of one of his 15th century predecessors (the aptly named) William Norwiche and his family. The only stained glass is the late Georgian east window (c1820, believed to be by a Mr Swan) which contains figures of Faith, Hope & Charity derived from Sir Joshua Reynolds designs for New College, Oxford. The painted detail has not lasted well, thus they appear more as ethereal masses of colour from afar. This is easily one of the city's best churches, and fortunately it is open to visitors most weekdays and has a keyholder for when it isn't. For more see Simon Knott's superb Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichgeorgecolegate/norwichge...
William Norwiche Brass, St George Colegate St George Colegate is a rarity in this area of Norwich in that it remains as a working church. It is one of the most attractive and rewarding in the city. Again the building is almost entirely the product of the late 15th century with a soaring west tower, chancel and north chapel and nave flanked by aisles and with another fine clerestorey. The interior is a real gem as seems to have been left alone by Victorian restorers and thus retains it's Georgian furnishings giving it an atmosphere quite unlike the other city churches, and much the better for it. It is remarkable how well the 15th century gothic of the architecture and the 18th century Georgian furnishing complement each other, it's an interior that feels like a time-capsule, and is well cared for and obviously loved. There are some fine memorials here, several wall tablets in the aisle, and a fine Renaissance terracotta tomb chest in the north chapel to former Mayor Robert Jannys (d.1530) and nearby brasses of one of his 15th century predecessors (the aptly named) William Norwiche and his family. The only stained glass is the late Georgian east window (c1820, believed to be by a Mr Swan) which contains figures of Faith, Hope & Charity derived from Sir Joshua Reynolds designs for New College, Oxford. The painted detail has not lasted well, thus they appear more as ethereal masses of colour from afar. This is easily one of the city's best churches, and fortunately it is open to visitors most weekdays and has a keyholder for when it isn't. For more see Simon Knott's superb Norfolk Churches website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichgeorgecolegate/norwichge.
Kurnbeck Monument, St Mary Coslany, Norwich Memorial to Dr Martin Van Kurnbeck and his wife from 1579. The deceased couple's kneeling figures are unusually incised into the stonework within the recess. St Mary Coslany is the only one of Norwich's many churches to have survived with it's ancient round tower (the other two were casualties of wartime bombing, St Julian's lost it's tower, whilst at St Benedict's the tower survived but the church didn't!). The tower itself is of late Saxon date (note the triangular-headed windows) and thus the oldest in the city. The rest of the church is 15th century rebuilding in the Perpendicular style and is cruciform in plan. Sadly this very attractive building is no longer used for services, and after spending a few years as a craft centre is now leased as private premises for a publishers and thus the interior is no longer accessible to the public, except for Heritage weekend in September. The interior is light and airy and has lost it's furnishings, and is currently being used as storage space for large numbers of 2nd hand books. It was good to see the interior survives otherwise unchanged by it's new use, I've seen working churches look far worse during village fetes! There are a couple of old wall tablets, the largest memorial being an arched recess with incised figures from 1579. But the outstanding features for me were the beautiful medieval timber ceilings, that over the crossing having bosses with an Assumption, whilst the panelled chancel roof is wonderfully rich; it has been restored but most of the carving is original. For more information on this lovely but sadly hard to visit church see Simon Knott's website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichmarycoslany/norwichmaryc...
Baroque Memorial, St Andrew's, Norwich Monument in the north aisle to Hambleton Custance d.1757, signed by T.Rawlins. St Andrew's is one of Norwich's largest parish churches, and like it's two closest rivals (St Peter Mancroft & St Stephen's, both in terms of size and location) remains in use as a working church. Alas it is not easily visited as it's generally only open for services (I found it locked on previous visits and had assumed it to be one of the redundant churches!). It is an impressive mostly 15th century structure with a fine clerestory that bathes the nave with light. The west tower seems to have lost it's parapet, giving it a somewhat 'shorn-off' look. Inside there is little architectural distinction between nave and chancel, other than the aisles terminating a bay shorter. The arcades are wide and tall allowing the aisles to appear more integrated with the nave. The furnishings are mostly Victorian, just a couple of old stalls with misericords survive of their medieval predecessors. The greatest treasures are the pieces of medieval glass in the south aisle (two 15th century panels including an unusual scene showing a bishop followed by a skeleton, an adjoining window has mid 16th century glass) fine series of late 16th century monuments to the Suckling family in the north chapel. For more on this fine church see below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichandrew/norwichandrew.htm
Sir John Suckling Tomb, St Andrew's, Norwich St Andrew's is one of Norwich's largest parish churches, and like it's two closest rivals (St Peter Mancroft & St Stephen's, both in terms of size and location) remains in use as a working church. Alas it is not easily visited as it's generally only open for services (I found it locked on previous visits and had assumed it to be one of the redundant churches!). It is an impressive mostly 15th century structure with a fine clerestory that bathes the nave with light. The west tower seems to have lost it's parapet, giving it a somewhat 'shorn-off' look. Inside there is little architectural distinction between nave and chancel, other than the aisles terminating a bay shorter. The arcades are wide and tall allowing the aisles to appear more integrated with the nave. The furnishings are mostly Victorian, just a couple of old stalls with misericords survive of their medieval predecessors. The greatest treasures are the pieces of medieval glass in the south aisle (two 15th century panels including an unusual scene showing a bishop followed by a skeleton, an adjoining window has mid 16th century glass) fine series of late 16th century monuments to the Suckling family in the north chapel. For more on this fine church see below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichandrew/norwichandrew.htm
Suckling Tombs, St Andrew's, Norwich St Andrew's is one of Norwich's largest parish churches, and like it's two closest rivals (St Peter Mancroft & St Stephen's, both in terms of size and location) remains in use as a working church. Alas it is not easily visited as it's generally only open for services (I found it locked on previous visits and had assumed it to be one of the redundant churches!). It is an impressive mostly 15th century structure with a fine clerestory that bathes the nave with light. The west tower seems to have lost it's parapet, giving it a somewhat 'shorn-off' look. Inside there is little architectural distinction between nave and chancel, other than the aisles terminating a bay shorter. The arcades are wide and tall allowing the aisles to appear more integrated with the nave. The furnishings are mostly Victorian, just a couple of old stalls with misericords survive of their medieval predecessors. The greatest treasures are the pieces of medieval glass in the south aisle (two 15th century panels including an unusual scene showing a bishop followed by a skeleton, an adjoining window has mid 16th century glass) fine series of late 16th century monuments to the Suckling family in the north chapel. For more on this fine church see below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichandrew/norwichandrew.htm
Decaying Monument, St Etheldreda's One of Norwich's more humble churches in the south of the city, St Etheldreda's shows something of it's difficult history, the stumpy octagonal tower is the result of renovation in the 18th century and much of the remainder needed thorough restoration in the 1880s after yet again falling into disrepair (during which time traces of wall paintings were found which have since vanished). The church has long been redundant and has been converted into studio spaces for artists, which has involved inserting a floor in the nave roof to create a kind of 'attic', access to which is via a metal staircase in the centre of the chancel. The interior of the church itself therefore looks somewhat shabby, but at least it's status as a working building ensured it's survival. There is subsequently not alot to see inside, all the furnishings have gone, just one Jacobean wall monument remains on the north chancel wall, everything else was removed to allow subdividision into units (there is no stained glass either, probably the case before redundancy). St Etheldreda's survives as a working building, and is generally not open to the public but much more valuable for it's picturesque exterior which at least survives intact thanks to it's conversion to new use. For more see Simon Knott's superb website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichetheldreda/norwichetheld... Also on Norwich Historic Churches Trust's website:- www.norwich-churches.org/St Etheldreda/home.shtm
Berney Effigies St Peter Parmentergate is a large and impressive mainly fifteenth century church in a quiet somewhat neglected area south of Norwich City Centre. It comes as no surprise to find it is no longer used as a church, though services continued as late as the 1980s. The nave of the church is currently used as a martial arts gym ( a session of which was in full flow when I visited); whilst this may seem rather incongrous it does at least allow the interior to remain more or less intact without the subdivision many conversions to new use involve. The chancel remains complete with most of it's furnishings and monuments, most important being the large Berney tomb from 1623 in the south east corner, an impressive Jacobean monument with effigies, mostly boxed in when I visited but since fully restored. The east window has early glass by Alexander Gibbs 1861 in rather harsh colours.The fine medieval font remains at the west end of the nave but was also boxed in for protection. An unusual feature here is the two storey extension east of the chancel, the former sacristry added in the early 16th century. For more see Simon Knott's superb website below:- www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichpeterparmentergate/norwi... Also on Norwich Historic Churches Trust's website:- www.norwich-churches.org/St%20Peter%20Parmentergate/home....

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