Вход в личный кабинет
Логин (не зарегистрированы?):
Пароль (забыли?):
Также можно войти, используя:
Google Яндекс Yahoo
Войти

Фото, сделанные другими фотоаппаратами OLYMPUS:

Список всех фотокамер →

Фото, сделанные u20D,S400D,u400D (OLYMPUS)

Wat Arun, Bangkok Located close to the Chao Phraya riverfront on Bangkok's west bank, Wat Arun (the Temple of Dawn) is one of the city's most prominent landmarks; it's towering steeple-like stupa, surrounded by four smaller spires known as prangs, forms a unique shilouette, at first as reminiscent of a gothic cathedral as a normal Thai temple. The temple itself is located behind the stupa/pagoda and is a fairly extensive complex founded in the late 18th century, but it is generally the giant spire-stupa, built in the first half of the 19th century, that visitors focus on. The monument is almost entirely encrusted with porcelain mosaic decoration which extends to much of the figure sculpture (rows of crouching demons, monkey warriors and apsaras can be seen propping up the tower at various levels). Two terraces, one and two thirds up respectively, afford spectacular views over the temple complex and across the Chao Phraya and city centre beyond. The upper level however is only accessible via a terrifyingly steep staircase! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Arun
Wat Arun, Bangkok Located close to the Chao Phraya riverfront on Bangkok's west bank, Wat Arun (the Temple of Dawn) is one of the city's most prominent landmarks; it's towering steeple-like stupa, surrounded by four smaller spires known as prangs, forms a unique shilouette, at first as reminiscent of a gothic cathedral as a normal Thai temple. The temple itself is located behind the stupa/pagoda and is a fairly extensive complex founded in the late 18th century, but it is generally the giant spire-stupa, built in the first half of the 19th century, that visitors focus on. The monument is almost entirely encrusted with porcelain mosaic decoration which extends to much of the figure sculpture (rows of crouching demons, monkey warriors and apsaras can be seen propping up the tower at various levels). Two terraces, one and two thirds up respectively, afford spectacular views over the temple complex and across the Chao Phraya and city centre beyond. The upper level however is only accessible via a terrifyingly steep staircase! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Arun
Guardian Giant, Wat Arun, Bangkok The Ordination Hall guarded by Yaksha giants (benign demons) in the precinct of Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn) on Bangkok's west bank. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Arun
Yaksha Giant, Wat Arun, Bangkok The Ordination Hall guarded by Yaksha giants (benign demons) in the precinct of Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn) on Bangkok's west bank. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Arun
Wat Arun, Bangkok Located close to the Chao Phraya riverfront on Bangkok's west bank, Wat Arun (the Temple of Dawn) is one of the city's most prominent landmarks; it's towering steeple-like stupa, surrounded by four smaller spires known as prangs, forms a unique shilouette, at first as reminiscent of a gothic cathedral as a normal Thai temple. The temple itself is located behind the stupa/pagoda and is a fairly extensive complex founded in the late 18th century, but it is generally the giant spire-stupa, built in the first half of the 19th century, that visitors focus on. The monument is almost entirely encrusted with porcelain mosaic decoration which extends to much of the figure sculpture (rows of crouching demons, monkey warriors and apsaras can be seen propping up the tower at various levels). Two terraces, one and two thirds up respectively, afford spectacular views over the temple complex and across the Chao Phraya and city centre beyond. The upper level however is only accessible via a terrifyingly steep staircase! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Arun
Temple Guardians, Wat Arun, Bangkok The Ordination Hall guarded by Yaksha giants (benign demons) in the precinct of Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn) on Bangkok's west bank. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Arun
Dugard Memorial 1683 St Peter's church in Barford is a mainly 19th century building with a 14th century tower, having been another recipient of the generosity of Mrs Louisa Ann Ryland (who rebuilt nearby Sherbourne church) who funded the rebuilding of all but the medieval tower in 1844 by R.C.Hussey. It has as much of a late Georgian as early Victorian feel to it. There are a few monuments from the old church, most notably the badly defaced 14th century effigy of a woman under the tower (originally in the churchyard) and the Dugard memorial of 1683 in the chancel. The remainder are tablets and urns roughly contemporary with the rebuilding of the church. The glass is of 1845 by William Holland of Warwick, and only the east window with it's Evangelist figures is fully pictoral, the remainder being in decorative quarries (except in the south aisle where the main lights have been removed c1950).
Defaced Effigy, Barford St Peter's church in Barford is a mainly 19th century building with a 14th century tower, having been another recipient of the generosity of Mrs Louisa Ann Ryland (who rebuilt nearby Sherbourne church) who funded the rebuilding of all but the medieval tower in 1844 by R.C.Hussey. It has as much of a late Georgian as early Victorian feel to it. There are a few monuments from the old church, most notably the badly defaced 14th century effigy of a woman under the tower (originally in the churchyard) and the Dugard memorial of 1683 in the chancel. The remainder are tablets and urns roughly contemporary with the rebuilding of the church. The glass is of 1845 by William Holland of Warwick, and only the east window with it's Evangelist figures is fully pictoral, the remainder being in decorative quarries (except in the south aisle where the main lights have been removed c1950).
Ryland Tomb (by Pugin) All Saints at Sherbourne is a Victorian masterpiece by Sir George Gilbert Scott and probably the finest 19th century parish church in the county. It was built in 1862-4 with generous funding from local landowner Lousia Ryland, which allowed Gilbert Scott to spare no expense on the decoration within (such as the marble nave columns). The interior is richly furnished and largely as Mrs Ryland and Gilbert Scott left it, with the addition of a south chapel contain a memorial to the founder and a vaulted organ chamber to the north. There are many tablets to the Ryland family around the walls and stained glass by Clayton & Bell, Heaton Butler & Bayne and Hardmans. The church is kept locked and requires an appointment to have it opened. On my first visit I was thus unlucky, but happily I was able to return some weeks later and get inside.
Benefactor's Memorial All Saints at Sherbourne is a Victorian masterpiece by Sir George Gilbert Scott and probably the finest 19th century parish church in the county. It was built in 1862-4 with generous funding from local landowner Lousia Ryland, which allowed Gilbert Scott to spare no expense on the decoration within (such as the marble nave columns). The interior is richly furnished and largely as Mrs Ryland and Gilbert Scott left it, with the addition of a south chapel contain a memorial to the founder and a vaulted organ chamber to the north. There are many tablets to the Ryland family around the walls and stained glass by Clayton & Bell, Heaton Butler & Bayne and Hardmans. The church is kept locked and requires an appointment to have it opened. On my first visit I was thus unlucky, but happily I was able to return some weeks later and get inside.
Dormer Monument, Budbrooke St Michael's at Budbrooke dates back to Norman times, as witnessed by the blocked north doorway, but the medieval fabric has been much restored in Victorian times (when the transepts were rebuilt). The interior appears to have been mostly renewed in the 1840s, with only the chancel arch and the unmoulded blocked north door evidently medieval. The only other antiquarian element is the very fine Baroque wall tablet to Rouland Dormer (d.1712) on the south side of the sanctuary. There is stained glass of 1846 with a small figure of St Michael by William Holland of Warwick in the east window (presumably earlier the quaint enamelled Evangelist symbol tracery lights in the south transept). The church is normally kept locked, my visit coincided with Heritage Open Days 2010.
Alice de la Pole, in Death Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Alice de la Pole, in Life Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Tomb, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Tomb, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Tomb, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Shield bearing Angels Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Shield bearing Angels Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Tomb Canopy, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
'Secret' Annunciation Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Cadaver, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Glimpses of Memento Mori Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Tomb Chest Angels Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Tomb, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Tomb, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Cadaver, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Tomb, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Lion Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Tomb Canopy, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Alice de la Pole, Duchess of Suffolk Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Duchess of Suffolk's Tomb, Ewelme Ewelme is distinguished by it's unique surviving complex of medieval buildings, church, almshouses and school, all dating from the 1430s and all still functioning. The benefactors were William and Alice de la Pole, the Duke & Duchess of Suffolk who once had a palace nearby. Alice was also the grand-daughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, and lies buried under one of the finest medieval monuments in England in the church she rebuilt in 1432. The church of St Mary the Virgin in Ewelme is one of the most rewarding parish churches, the star attraction is the Duchess of Suffolk's splendid tomb, erected in 1475, under a canopy south of the altar. She lies in her earthly finery, but below is a memento mori, her cadaver effigy, viewed through openings beneath the row of shield-bearing angels on the tomb chest. The condition of the monument is exceptional, no small thanks to the doors having been locked to 17th century puritan vandals. There are other fine sculpured details around the church and a magnificent 15th century panelled ceiling to the south chapel, carved with angels. The east window here also contains a medley of 15th century stained glass fragments collected from various windows. Another outstanding feature is the font, also from 1475 which is dominated by it's angel-capped spire-like wooden cover, over 10ft high and raised by a pulley carved like a tudor rose.
Tomb Recess, Newington St Giles's church at Newington dates mostly from between the 12th and 14th centuries and consists of chancel and nave without aisles and a small north transept, dominated by the c1300 west tower and spire. It is sadly no longer used for services and facing an uncertain future, and is generally closed to the public. There are some real treasures within; there is outstanding 15th century stained glass in the north chancel including an Assumption of Mary and a Holy Trinity group, with donor figures below. (a further fragment of Mary from an Annunciation is in a south nave window). There is also a fine early Baroque monument to Walter Dunch and his wife from 1650, with striking busts of the deceased couple portrayed wearing shrouds.
Shrouded Busts St Giles's church at Newington dates mostly from between the 12th and 14th centuries and consists of chancel and nave without aisles and a small north transept, dominated by the c1300 west tower and spire. It is sadly no longer used for services and facing an uncertain future, and is generally closed to the public. There are some real treasures within; there is outstanding 15th century stained glass in the north chancel including an Assumption of Mary and a Holy Trinity group, with donor figures below. (a further fragment of Mary from an Annunciation is in a south nave window). There is also a fine early Baroque monument to Walter Dunch and his wife from 1650, with striking busts of the deceased couple portrayed wearing shrouds.
Dunch Monument, Newington St Giles's church at Newington dates mostly from between the 12th and 14th centuries and consists of chancel and nave without aisles and a small north transept, dominated by the c1300 west tower and spire. It is sadly no longer used for services and facing an uncertain future, and is generally closed to the public. There are some real treasures within; there is outstanding 15th century stained glass in the north chancel including an Assumption of Mary and a Holy Trinity group, with donor figures below. (a further fragment of Mary from an Annunciation is in a south nave window). There is also a fine early Baroque monument to Walter Dunch and his wife from 1650, with striking busts of the deceased couple portrayed wearing shrouds.
Chancel Monuments, Newington St Giles's church at Newington dates mostly from between the 12th and 14th centuries and consists of chancel and nave without aisles and a small north transept, dominated by the c1300 west tower and spire. It is sadly no longer used for services and facing an uncertain future, and is generally closed to the public. There are some real treasures within; there is outstanding 15th century stained glass in the north chancel including an Assumption of Mary and a Holy Trinity group, with donor figures below. (a further fragment of Mary from an Annunciation is in a south nave window). There is also a fine early Baroque monument to Walter Dunch and his wife from 1650, with striking busts of the deceased couple portrayed wearing shrouds.
Sarah Morley Monument Memorial in the north nave aisle at Gloucester to Sarah Morley who died at sea in 1784. The sculptor was John Flaxman. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Williams Tomb Monument to Elizabeth Williams (a daughter of Bishop Miles) and her stillborn infant, erected in the early 17th century on the north side of the Lady Chapel at Gloucester Cathedral. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Judge John Powell Monument to Judge John Powell carved in 1713 by Thomas Green of Camberwell, and situated on the north side of the Lady Chapel at Gloucester Cathedral. Impressive though the monument may be, it's installation was without sensitivity to the surrounding architecture and must have involved considerable cutting away of the late gothic stonework. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Putto with Green's Signature Monument to Judge John Powell carved in 1713 by Thomas Green of Camberwell, and situated on the north side of the Lady Chapel at Gloucester Cathedral. Impressive though the monument may be, it's installation was without sensitivity to the surrounding architecture and must have involved considerable cutting away of the late gothic stonework. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Prince Osric 16th century tomb of Prince Osric, who founded of Gloucester Abbey in 681. His posthumous effigy holds a model of the church he built. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Abbot Parker's Tomb Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Abbot Parker, Gloucester Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Edward II Tomb, Gloucester Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Edward II Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Robert Duke of Normandy The tomb of Robert Curthose, eldest son of William the Conqueror and Duke of Normandy, denied the throne of England in favour of his brothers. (for more illuminating details see here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Curthose ). He joined the first Crusade, thus this figure supports the well known legend of cross-legged effigies! The tomb itself is a somewhat later creation, the oak effigy is 13th century whilst the tomb chest below (also of wood) is late 15th century, along with the cage like 'pall-cover' over the figure, a rare survival. It stood for many years in the centre of the choir, but was relocated to the south choir aisle in the late 20th century. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Robert Duke of Normandy Tomb, Gloucester The tomb of Robert Curthose, eldest son of William the Conqueror and Duke of Normandy, denied the throne of England in favour of his brothers. (for more illuminating details see here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Curthose ). He joined the first Crusade, thus this figure supports the well known legend of cross-legged effigies! The tomb itself is a somewhat later creation, the oak effigy is 13th century whilst the tomb chest below (also of wood) is late 15th century, along with the cage like 'pall-cover' over the figure, a rare survival. It stood for many years in the centre of the choir, but was relocated to the south choir aisle in the late 20th century. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Abbot Seabroke Tomb, Gloucester Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Abraham & Gertrude Blackleech Detail of the tomb of Abraham & Gertrude Blackleech in the south transept at Gloucester. The monument dates from 1639 and is the work of an unknown highly skilled sculptor, similar to the work of Nicholas Stone. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Abraham Blackleech Tomb 1639 The tomb of Abraham & Gertrude Blackleech in the south transept at Gloucester. The monument dates from 1639 and is the work of an unknown highly skilled sculptor, similar to the work of Nicholas Stone. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
17th Century Eagle Detail of the tomb of Abraham & Gertrude Blackleech in the south transept at Gloucester. The monument dates from 1639 and is the work of an unknown highly skilled sculptor, similar to the work of Nicholas Stone. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15      

← Назад

@VFL_RU Uptime по данным Ping-Admin.Ru - сервиса мониторинга доступности сайтов
Версия для мобильных устройств.
Концепция, программирование и дизайн проекта — «Седжин».
© VFL.RU 2001–2020