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19th Century Eagle Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk/ My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Bishop Goldsborough, Gloucester Cathedral Monument to Bishop Goldsborough erected in 1604 in the north chantry of the Lady Chapel at Gloucester Cathedral. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Elizabeth Williams Tomb Monument to Elizabeth Williams (a daughter of Bishop Miles) and her stillborn infant, erected in the early 17th century on the north side of the Lady Chapel at Gloucester Cathedral. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
John Powell Memorial 1713 Monument to Judge John Powell carved in 1713 by Thomas Green of Camberwell, and situated on the north side of the Lady Chapel at Gloucester Cathedral. Impressive though the monument may be, it's installation was without sensitivity to the surrounding architecture and must have involved considerable cutting away of the late gothic stonework. Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Prince Osric's Tomb, Gloucester Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Tomb of Edward II, Gloucester Gloucester Cathedral is one of England's finest churches, a masterpiece of medieval architecture consisting of a uniquely beautiful fusion of Norman Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic from the mid 14th century onwards. Until the Reformation this was merely Gloucester's Abbey of St Peter, under Henry VIII it became one of six former monastic churches to be promoted to cathedral status, thus saving the great church from the ravages of the Dissolution. The most obviously Norman part is the nave, immediately apparent on entering the building with it's round arches and thick columns (the exterior is the result of Gothic remodelling). Much of the remainder of the building is substantially the Norman structure also, but almost entirely modified in the later Middle Ages inside and out, the result of the great revenue brought to the abbey by pilgrims to the tomb of the murdered King Edward II in the choir. It was this transformation of the Norman church that is credited with launching the late gothic Perpendicular style in England. The gothic choir is a unique and spectacular work, the walls so heavily panelled as to suggest a huge stone cage (disguising the Norman arches behind) crowned by a glorious net-like vault adorned with numerous bosses (those over the Altar with superb figures of Christ and angels) whilst the east wall is entirely glazing in delicate stone tracery, and still preserving most of it's original 14th century stained glass. The soaring central tower, also richly panelled with delicate pinnacles, is another testament to the abbey's increasing wealth at this time. The latest medieval additions to the church are equally glorious, the Lady Chapel is entered through the enormous east window and is itself a largely glazed structure, though the original glass has been reduced to a few fragments in the east window, the remainder now contains beautiful Arts & Crafts stained glass by Christopher and Veronica Whall. The early 16th century cloisters to the north of the nave are some of the most beautiful anywhere, being completely covered by exquisite fan vaulting, with a seperate lavatorium (washing room) attached to the north walk as a miniature version of the main passages. There is much more of interest, from 14th century choir stalls with misericords to the comprehensive collection of tombs and monuments of various dates, including the elaborate tomb of Edward II and that of Robert Duke of Normandy, eldest son of William the Conqueror. The stained glass also represents all ages, from the 14th century to the striking contemporary windows by Tom Denny. Further areas of the cathedral can be accessed at certain times, such as the Norman crypt under the choir and the triforium gallery above. My visit coincided with the major 'Crucible' exhibition of contemporary sculpture (September-October 2010), examples of which I will upload in due course.
Tomb Recess Ballflower SS Peter & Paul's at Brockhall is a most picturesque sight, built of the warm golden ironstone so typical of the area and forming a group with the fine old hall that overshadows the churchyard. The church is a small building, nave and chancel with a south aisle seperated by a late Norman arcade. The west tower is quite miniature, carried on arches within the west bay of the nave. Inside the most notable feature is the 14th century tomb recess in the south aisle decorated with ballflower ornament. It contains a slab with indents for a cross and lettering originally inlaid with metal. There are two small roundels of 15th century glass with foliate patterns in the north nave windows. The church is kept locked, but keyholder information is given.
Bishop Walsh's Tomb St Chad's Cathedral in Birmingham was built between 1839-41 by the renowned A.W.N.Pugin and remains one of his masterworks. It was also the first Catholic Cathedral to be built in Britain since the Reformation (it's Cathedral status was formally consolidated in 1850 when the Catholic hierarchy for England and Wales was re-established by the Pope). The setting is unfortunate, being largely seperated from the city centre by busy roads and roundabouts, though at least the space around it allows proper appreciation of the red brick exterior. The style is inspired by that of the medieval churches of Germany and other Baltic countries. The light and airy interior comes as a surprise after the austerity of the external walls of brick, and still exhibits some of the richness favoured by Pugin, despite the removal of his rood screen and other fittings in the 1960s (the rood itself has since been returned and now hangs alone above the sanctuary). There is a full compliment of stained glass, mostly by Hardman's, Pugin's chief collaborator and protege in this medium, though the apse windows are examples of Pugin's earlier employment of William Warrington. There are relics of earlier times here in the continental medieval furnishings collected by Pugin including a fine Madonna & Child, a 15th century pulpit from Louvain (carved with the 4 Doctors of the Church) and ancient choir stalls from Cologne. The cathedral also houses relics of St Chad, spirited away from Lichfield Cathedral during the destruction of the Reformation by devoted followers. stchadscathedral.org.uk/
Monument Undraped St Mary's church at Drayton Beachamp (near Aylesbury) is a beautiful largely 15th century church in a peaceful setting with much to offer the visitor. The decorative checquered flint effect on the exterior is particularly attractive. Inside there are good monuments, specifically two large memorial brasses of knights flanking the altar and an impressive (if somewhat pompous) Baroque affair on the north side of the chancel. There is a fine sequence of Victorian stained glass windows in the nave aisles by Clayton & Bell of London, however the star attraction here is the original medieval glass in the chancel, with an almost complete east window based on the Apostle's creed c1430, with ten Apostle figures holding seperate pieces of the text (two figures are Victorian replacements). There is also a damaged figure of Mary nearby, the oldest piece in the church. I got to know this church in 2005 through work, when Norgrove Studios was asked to relead the plain clerestorey glazing. Initially I therefore experienced the interior as a building site half full of dust-sheets and scaffolding; only at the very end of the project could I appreciate the full beauty of this church.
Under the Dust-Sheets St Mary's church at Drayton Beachamp (near Aylesbury) is a beautiful largely 15th century church in a peaceful setting with much to offer the visitor. The decorative checquered flint effect on the exterior is particularly attractive. Inside there are good monuments, specifically two large memorial brasses of knights flanking the altar and an impressive (if somewhat pompous) Baroque affair on the north side of the chancel. There is a fine sequence of Victorian stained glass windows in the nave aisles by Clayton & Bell of London, however the star attraction here is the original medieval glass in the chancel, with an almost complete east window based on the Apostle's creed c1430, with ten Apostle figures holding seperate pieces of the text (two figures are Victorian replacements). There is also a damaged figure of Mary nearby, the oldest piece in the church. I got to know this church in 2005 through work, when Norgrove Studios was asked to relead the plain clerestorey glazing. Initially I therefore experienced the interior as a building site half full of dust-sheets and scaffolding; only at the very end of the project could I appreciate the full beauty of this church.
Draped Monument St Mary's church at Drayton Beachamp (near Aylesbury) is a beautiful largely 15th century church in a peaceful setting with much to offer the visitor. The decorative checquered flint effect on the exterior is particularly attractive. Inside there are good monuments, specifically two large memorial brasses of knights flanking the altar and an impressive (if somewhat pompous) Baroque affair on the north side of the chancel. There is a fine sequence of Victorian stained glass windows in the nave aisles by Clayton & Bell of London, however the star attraction here is the original medieval glass in the chancel, with an almost complete east window based on the Apostle's creed c1430, with ten Apostle figures holding seperate pieces of the text (two figures are Victorian replacements). There is also a damaged figure of Mary nearby, the oldest piece in the church. I got to know this church in 2005 through work, when Norgrove Studios was asked to relead the plain clerestorey glazing. Initially I therefore experienced the interior as a building site half full of dust-sheets and scaffolding; only at the very end of the project could I appreciate the full beauty of this church.
Sir Egerton Leigh 1818, Newbold St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
William Boughton Monument, Newbold Baroque monument on the south side of the chancel at Newbold to Sir William Boughton and his wife, the work of John Hunt of Northampton, 1716. St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Boughton Monument, Newbold Baroque monument on the south side of the chancel at Newbold to Sir William Boughton and his wife, the work of John Hunt of Northampton, 1716. St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Sir William Boughton 1716 Baroque monument on the south side of the chancel at Newbold to Sir William Boughton and his wife, the work of John Hunt of Northampton, 1716. St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Boughton Family 1583 St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Boughton Family 1583 St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Boughton Family 1583 St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Edward Boughton 1583 St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Edward Boughton 1635 St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Eleanor & Geoffrey Allesley 1441 St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Angel Shield Bearers Detail from the tomb of John Boughton in the south aisle at Newbold. St Botolph's at Newbold on Avon (now virtually a suburb of Rugby) is one of the more interesting of the historic churches in this part of Warwickshire with a collection of monuments to the Boughton Family of various dates. The nave and tower date mostly from the 15th century rebuilding but the plain chancel was rebuilt in the early Victorian period. The interior is light with little Victorian stained glass, unusually confined to the nave aisles (three by Heaton, Butler & Bayne on the north side, one by Burlison & Grylls on the south). The main east window is mostly plain. The monuments are from distinct periods, two 15th century tombs in the south aisle have flat incised slabs with the images of Geoffrey Allesley and John Boughton with their respective wives. Also in the south aisle two wall monuments with small, rather folksy figures carved in relief to two generations of the Boughton family (of Little Lawford Hall). The largest of all is that to William Boughton & wife from 1716, a rather pompous Baroque piece with standing figures that dominates the chancel. This a church that certainly rewards the visitor but alas is normally kept locked, though there may be keyholder information or phonenumbers given (I called in on Heritage weekend when it was opened and seemed to be recieving a constant flow of visitors).
Emerald Buddha Temple, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Emerald Buddha Temple, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Emerald Buddha Temple, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Shrine, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Shrines, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Gilded Shrines, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Ceramic Shrine, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Demon & Monkey Warriors, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Golden Chedi, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Wat Phra Kaew & Grand Palace, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Gilded Decoration, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Glittering Pillars, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Golden Warrior, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Human-Faced Nagas, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Golden Guardians, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Gilt Decoration, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Gold Stupa, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Phra Mondop, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Yaksha Guardian, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Emerald Buddha Temple, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Golden Stupa, Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Royal Palace / Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Bangkok's most unmissable attraction is of course the Grand Palace, and most specifically the temple complex of Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), famed for it's riot of coloured and gilded ornament, paintings and sculptures; quite simply, so visually stunning there is nothing quite like it anywhere else! The Palace and Temple complex were begun in 1782, the year the capital was moved to Bangkok, and parts of the palace buildings betray 18th century European influence combined with traditional Thai style, such as the breathtaking gilt spires on the roof. Most of the interiors of the Palace itself are off limits to visitors since, although no longer the main residence of the thai monarchy, it is frequently used for state functions and ceremonies. The Wat Phra Kaew complex however is the greatest draw, famed for it's stunning architecture and the famous 'Yaksha' guardian figures that flank all the main entrances to the complex. These towering figures, with their rich colours and tapering crowns, represent demonic characters from the mythological epic the 'Ramakien', and are identifiable as distinct individuals, all here serving a benign, protective role. The Ramakien is also the subject for a stunning sequence of wall paintings within the cloister that encirlces the entire site, illustrating in minute detail the battles of the heroic monkey warriors, led by the monkey god Hanuman, against the demonic armies and kingdoms of Tosakan. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha itself forms the largest structure and contains the venerated (though small) Buddha image. The complex contains several other iconic buildings clad in sumptuous decor, most notably the library or 'mondop' with it's gilt spire along with the great golden stupa. The temple complex is technically a royal chapel rather than a working monastery like most Thai temples as it has no resident monks (the sheer volume of visitors leaves little room for anyone else anyway!). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Kaew en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Palace
Wat Pho, Bangkok Wat Pho is the largest and oldest temple complex in Bangkok, and along with the temmple of the royal palace the most visited. The sprawling complex covers a huge area and it is quite easy to lose oneself within it's series of courtyards, gateways and stunning temple buildings. The present complex largely dates back to 1788, having been founded in response to the sacking of the former capital Ayutthaya by the Burmese in 1767 where a similar complex was destroyed. It is known as a place of learning and has a renowned school of Thai massage within the site. The temple complex is entered through one of many gateways guarded by huge Chinese statues, believed to have been imported as ballast on ships trading with China..The outer gates have fierce warrior figures, whilst the inner courtyards have the bizarre 'farang' ('foreigner') figures with their peculiar 'top hats', believed to represent the first European visitors to the east. Many of the inner courtyards are surrounded by a cloister containing over 400 sculptures of the seated Buddha, whilst the main Bot, the spiritual nucleus of the temple, is beautifully decorated within with frescoes of rich landscapes in red and gold. The biggest and most spectacular attraction of the temple however is the Hall of the Reclining Buddha, housing an enormous gilded recumbent figure of the Buddha over 160ft long, filling the entire centre of the chamber. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho
Gift Shop, Wat Pho, Bangkok Wat Pho is the largest and oldest temple complex in Bangkok, and along with the temmple of the royal palace the most visited. The sprawling complex covers a huge area and it is quite easy to lose oneself within it's series of courtyards, gateways and stunning temple buildings. The present complex largely dates back to 1788, having been founded in response to the sacking of the former capital Ayutthaya by the Burmese in 1767 where a similar complex was destroyed. It is known as a place of learning and has a renowned school of Thai massage within the site. The temple complex is entered through one of many gateways guarded by huge Chinese statues, believed to have been imported as ballast on ships trading with China..The outer gates have fierce warrior figures, whilst the inner courtyards have the bizarre 'farang' ('foreigner') figures with their peculiar 'top hats', believed to represent the first European visitors to the east. Many of the inner courtyards are surrounded by a cloister containing over 400 sculptures of the seated Buddha, whilst the main Bot, the spiritual nucleus of the temple, is beautifully decorated within with frescoes of rich landscapes in red and gold. The biggest and most spectacular attraction of the temple however is the Hall of the Reclining Buddha, housing an enormous gilded recumbent figure of the Buddha over 160ft long, filling the entire centre of the chamber. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho
Miniature Stupas, Wat Pho, Bangkok Wat Pho is the largest and oldest temple complex in Bangkok, and along with the temmple of the royal palace the most visited. The sprawling complex covers a huge area and it is quite easy to lose oneself within it's series of courtyards, gateways and stunning temple buildings. The present complex largely dates back to 1788, having been founded in response to the sacking of the former capital Ayutthaya by the Burmese in 1767 where a similar complex was destroyed. It is known as a place of learning and has a renowned school of Thai massage within the site. The temple complex is entered through one of many gateways guarded by huge Chinese statues, believed to have been imported as ballast on ships trading with China..The outer gates have fierce warrior figures, whilst the inner courtyards have the bizarre 'farang' ('foreigner') figures with their peculiar 'top hats', believed to represent the first European visitors to the east. Many of the inner courtyards are surrounded by a cloister containing over 400 sculptures of the seated Buddha, whilst the main Bot, the spiritual nucleus of the temple, is beautifully decorated within with frescoes of rich landscapes in red and gold. The biggest and most spectacular attraction of the temple however is the Hall of the Reclining Buddha, housing an enormous gilded recumbent figure of the Buddha over 160ft long, filling the entire centre of the chamber. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho
Minotaur in a Sarong, Wat Pho, Bangkok Wat Pho is the largest and oldest temple complex in Bangkok, and along with the temmple of the royal palace the most visited. The sprawling complex covers a huge area and it is quite easy to lose oneself within it's series of courtyards, gateways and stunning temple buildings. The present complex largely dates back to 1788, having been founded in response to the sacking of the former capital Ayutthaya by the Burmese in 1767 where a similar complex was destroyed. It is known as a place of learning and has a renowned school of Thai massage within the site. The temple complex is entered through one of many gateways guarded by huge Chinese statues, believed to have been imported as ballast on ships trading with China..The outer gates have fierce warrior figures, whilst the inner courtyards have the bizarre 'farang' ('foreigner') figures with their peculiar 'top hats', believed to represent the first European visitors to the east. Many of the inner courtyards are surrounded by a cloister containing over 400 sculptures of the seated Buddha, whilst the main Bot, the spiritual nucleus of the temple, is beautifully decorated within with frescoes of rich landscapes in red and gold. The biggest and most spectacular attraction of the temple however is the Hall of the Reclining Buddha, housing an enormous gilded recumbent figure of the Buddha over 160ft long, filling the entire centre of the chamber. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

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