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NYC - SoHo: Status Factory - Sunflower Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory - World Cow Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory - World Cow Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory - Grin Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
Status Factory Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory - Dead Toy Soldier Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory - Kursed Kid Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory - Marilyn Mickeys Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory - MC Supersized Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - SoHo: Status Factory - MC Supersized Status Factory, a pop up exhibit presented by Opera Gallery and Ron English, traced English's most amibitious themes and well-known character motifs in a "camo-arcadian warholian times square circus sideshow mash-up barely contained by the silver walls at 382 West Broadway" from September 12 to October 30, 2010. English coined the term POPaganda to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters, including MC Supersized, the obese fast-food mascot featured in the hit movie "Supersize Me," and Abraham Obama, the explosive fusion of America's 16th and 44th Presidents.
NYC - TriBeCa: 101 Barclay 101 Barclay, was originally built in 1985 to the design of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP as the Irving Trust Operations Center. Once Irving Trust was acquired by the Bank of New York in 1988, the 325-foot modern highrise became known as the The Bank of New York Technology and Operations Center. During the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the building was badly damaged, mostly due to the collapse of the 7 World Trade Center, across the street. The collapse shattered most of the windows on the southern facade and debris poured into the atrium. The damage forced closure until July 12, 2002.
NYC: 7 WTC and 101 Barclay 101 Barclay (right), was originally built in 1985 to the design of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP as the Irving Trust Operations Center. Once Irving Trust was acquired by the Bank of New York in 1988, the 325-foot modern highrise became known as the The Bank of New York Technology and Operations Center. During the September 11th 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the building was badly damaged, mostly due to the collapse of the 7 World Trade Center, across the street. The collapse shattered most of the windows on the southern facade and debris poured into the atrium. The damage forced closure until July 12, 2002. The new 7 World Trade Center (left) office building officially opened on May 23, 2006 after the original was destroyed on September 11, 2001. It was the first building to be rebuilt with a World Trade Center address and was not included in the original World Trade Center master plan by Daniel Libeskind. The 52-story building, designed by David Childs of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill in conjunction with glass designer/artist James Carpenter, is is 750 feet tall, and contains 1,700,000 square feet of leasable office space starting from the 11th floor. The first ten floors are devoted to an electrical substation which powers most of Lower Manhattan. They used ultra-clear, low-iron glass to provide reflectivity and light, with stainless-steel spandrels behind the glass that also help reflect sunlight. Artist Jenny Holzer created a large light installation inside the main lobby with glowing text moving across wide plastic panels. The entire wall is about 30 meters wide by 7 meters tall and changes colors, according to the time of day. The building is considered New York City's first "green" office tower by gaining gold status in the US Green Building Council's LEED program. Rainwater is collected and used for irrigation of a triangular park, and to cool the building. Recycled steel was used in the building's construction. The park outside was created by David Childs with Ken Smith and his colleague Annie Weinmayr of Ken Smith Landscape Architect. It consists simply of an open plaza with a fountain and groves of trees. The fountain features Jeff Koons's mirror-polished stainless steel sculpture, Balloon Flower (Red), which represents a twisted balloon in the shape of a flower.
NYC - TriBeCa: 101 Barclay 101 Barclay, was originally built in 1985 to the design of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP as the Irving Trust Operations Center. Once Irving Trust was acquired by the Bank of New York in 1988, the 325-foot modern highrise became known as the The Bank of New York Technology and Operations Center. During the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the building was badly damaged, mostly due to the collapse of the 7 World Trade Center, across the street. The collapse shattered most of the windows on the southern facade and debris poured into the atrium. The damage forced closure until July 12, 2002.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Coconut Panna Cotta Coconut Panna Cotta with pineapple granita, sesame brittle. Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Malasadas Malasadas, portuguese style doughnuts, with guava and rum sauce. Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Dark Chocolate Tart Dark Chocolate Tart, ginger & allspice liquors, and chestnut dust. Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Ants Climbing the Tree Ants Climbing the Tree, glass noodles, minced heritage pork, and chilies. Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Heritage Pork and Lamb Meatballs Heritage Pork and Lamb Meatballs, with tetilla cheese, smoked paprika tomato sauce and chorico. Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Vegetable Mapo Dofu The Vegetable Map Dofu, soy marinated tofu, spicy bean & szechuan pepper sauce. Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Peking Style Pork Ribs The Peking Style Pork Ribs, sweet & sour, twice cooked. Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Tortilha do Macao The Tortilha do Macao is potato & sauteed lump crab meat with curry aioli. Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Mushroom & Truffle Croquettes Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Macao Trading Co - Bashful Maiden Hendrick's Gin shaken with St. Germain Elderflower Liquer, Velvet Falernum, Lemon Juice & Pureed STriped Melon, served straight up. Macao Trading Co, at 311 Church Street, was opened in 2008 by the team from Employees Only, David Waltuck, chef-owner of Chanterelle , and his sous-chef Keith Harry. The bi-level Tribeca space features food from Macao, a Portuguese colony in China with heavy African and Indian influences.
Boston University: Agganis Arena Agganis Arena, located at 925 Commonwealth Avenue, was dedicated in 2004 and opened on January 3, 2005 when the the Boston Terriers ice hockey team defeated the Minnesota Golden Gophers by a score of 2-1 on Jack Parker Rink, named after the college hockey's winningest head coach who has guided the team since 1973. Ironically, the Terriers had lost by the very same score to the same team the day before in their old arena, the legendary Walter Brown Arena. Agganis Arena is a 29,000 square foot venue with 6,300 seats that expands to over 7,2000 seats for concerts and other events. In addition to serving as the home to the Boston University Terriers ice hockey team, is hosts BU basketball games, concerts, regional athletic tournaments, trade shows and other Boston University events. The arena is part of Boston University's John Hancock Student Village, or StuVi, a $225-million, 10-acre residential and recreational complex between Buick Street and Nickerson Field on ground formerly occupied by a National Guard Armory. The arena is named after Harry Agganis (SED '54). "The Golden Greek" was a native of Lynn, Massachusetts and a football and baseball standout for the Boston University Terriers. Agganis was the school's first All-American football player and was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the first round of the 1952 NFL Draft, but instead signed to play first base for the Boston Red Sox for $35,000. In his second season, he got off to a good start, hitting .313 in his first 25 games before being hospitalized with pneumonia on June 2. He rejoined the team, but fell ill again in Kansas City on June 27 and was flown back to Cambridge, where he died of a pulmonary embolism at the age of 26. Agganis was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.
Boston University: Agganis Arena - Harry Agganis statue The portrait statue of Harry Agganis by sculptor Armand LaMontagne was unveiled May 4, 2004 at Meze restaurant in Charlestown before being permanently installed outside of the Agganis Arena at Boston University on the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Harry Agganis Way, formerly Gaffney Street. Aristotle George (Harry) Agganis (SED '54), "The Golden Greek" was a native of Lynn, Massachusetts and a football and baseball standout for the Boston University Terriers. After a sophomore season in 1949 in which he set a school record with fifteen touchdown passes, Harry entered the Marine Corps where he served fifteen months during the Korean War. Returning to college in 1951, he became the school's first All-American, setting the school record for 1,402 yards passing and winning the Bulger Lowe Award as New England's outstanding football player. That year, as a first baseman, he hit .322. Following his junior season, he was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the first round of the 1952 NFL Draft, but instead signed to play first base for the Boston Red Sox for $35,000. Following his 1953 graduation, Agganis played with AAA Louisville before making his major league debut in 1954. As a rookie, he was a standout defensive player. In his second season, he got off to a good start, hitting .313 in his first 25 games before being hospitalized with pneumonia on June 2. He rejoined the team, but fell ill again in Kansas City on June 27 and was flown back to Cambridge, where he died of a pulmonary embolism at the age of 26. Agganis was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Agganis Arena, located at 925 Commonwealth Avenue, was dedicated in 2004 and opened on January 3, 2005 when the the Boston Terriers ice hockey team defeated the Minnesota Golden Gophers by a score of 2-1 on Jack Parker Rink, named after the college hockey's winningest head coach who has guided the team since 1973. Ironically, the Terriers had lost by the very same score to the same team the day before in their old arena, the legendary Walter Brown Arena. Agganis Arena is a 29,000 square foot venue with 6,300 seats that expands to over 7,2000 seats for concerts and other events. In addition to serving as the home to the Boston University Terriers ice hockey team, is hosts BU basketball games, concerts, regional athletic tournaments, trade shows and other Boston University events. The arena is part of Boston University's John Hancock Student Village, or StuVi, a $225-million, 10-acre residential and recreational complex between Buick Street and Nickerson Field on ground formerly occupied by a National Guard Armory.
Boston University: Agganis Arena - Harry Agganis statue The portrait statue of Harry Agganis by sculptor Armand LaMontagne was unveiled May 4, 2004 at Meze restaurant in Charlestown before being permanently installed outside of the Agganis Arena at Boston University on the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Harry Agganis Way, formerly Gaffney Street. Aristotle George (Harry) Agganis (SED '54), "The Golden Greek" was a native of Lynn, Massachusetts and a football and baseball standout for the Boston University Terriers. After a sophomore season in 1949 in which he set a school record with fifteen touchdown passes, Harry entered the Marine Corps where he served fifteen months during the Korean War. Returning to college in 1951, he became the school's first All-American, setting the school record for 1,402 yards passing and winning the Bulger Lowe Award as New England's outstanding football player. That year, as a first baseman, he hit .322. Following his junior season, he was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the first round of the 1952 NFL Draft, but instead signed to play first base for the Boston Red Sox for $35,000. Following his 1953 graduation, Agganis played with AAA Louisville before making his major league debut in 1954. As a rookie, he was a standout defensive player. In his second season, he got off to a good start, hitting .313 in his first 25 games before being hospitalized with pneumonia on June 2. He rejoined the team, but fell ill again in Kansas City on June 27 and was flown back to Cambridge, where he died of a pulmonary embolism at the age of 26. Agganis was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Agganis Arena, located at 925 Commonwealth Avenue, was dedicated in 2004 and opened on January 3, 2005 when the the Boston Terriers ice hockey team defeated the Minnesota Golden Gophers by a score of 2-1 on Jack Parker Rink, named after the college hockey's winningest head coach who has guided the team since 1973. Ironically, the Terriers had lost by the very same score to the same team the day before in their old arena, the legendary Walter Brown Arena. Agganis Arena is a 29,000 square foot venue with 6,300 seats that expands to over 7,2000 seats for concerts and other events. In addition to serving as the home to the Boston University Terriers ice hockey team, is hosts BU basketball games, concerts, regional athletic tournaments, trade shows and other Boston University events. The arena is part of Boston University's John Hancock Student Village, or StuVi, a $225-million, 10-acre residential and recreational complex between Buick Street and Nickerson Field on ground formerly occupied by a National Guard Armory.
Boston University: Agganis Arena - Harry Agganis statue The portrait statue of Harry Agganis by sculptor Armand LaMontagne was unveiled May 4, 2004 at Meze restaurant in Charlestown before being permanently installed outside of the Agganis Arena at Boston University on the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Harry Agganis Way, formerly Gaffney Street. Aristotle George (Harry) Agganis (SED '54), "The Golden Greek" was a native of Lynn, Massachusetts and a football and baseball standout for the Boston University Terriers. After a sophomore season in 1949 in which he set a school record with fifteen touchdown passes, Harry entered the Marine Corps where he served fifteen months during the Korean War. Returning to college in 1951, he became the school's first All-American, setting the school record for 1,402 yards passing and winning the Bulger Lowe Award as New England's outstanding football player. That year, as a first baseman, he hit .322. Following his junior season, he was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the first round of the 1952 NFL Draft, but instead signed to play first base for the Boston Red Sox for $35,000. Following his 1953 graduation, Agganis played with AAA Louisville before making his major league debut in 1954. As a rookie, he was a standout defensive player. In his second season, he got off to a good start, hitting .313 in his first 25 games before being hospitalized with pneumonia on June 2. He rejoined the team, but fell ill again in Kansas City on June 27 and was flown back to Cambridge, where he died of a pulmonary embolism at the age of 26. Agganis was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Agganis Arena, located at 925 Commonwealth Avenue, was dedicated in 2004 and opened on January 3, 2005 when the the Boston Terriers ice hockey team defeated the Minnesota Golden Gophers by a score of 2-1 on Jack Parker Rink, named after the college hockey's winningest head coach who has guided the team since 1973. Ironically, the Terriers had lost by the very same score to the same team the day before in their old arena, the legendary Walter Brown Arena. Agganis Arena is a 29,000 square foot venue with 6,300 seats that expands to over 7,2000 seats for concerts and other events. In addition to serving as the home to the Boston University Terriers ice hockey team, is hosts BU basketball games, concerts, regional athletic tournaments, trade shows and other Boston University events. The arena is part of Boston University's John Hancock Student Village, or StuVi, a $225-million, 10-acre residential and recreational complex between Buick Street and Nickerson Field on ground formerly occupied by a National Guard Armory.
Boston University: Agganis Arena - Harry Agganis statue The portrait statue of Harry Agganis by sculptor Armand LaMontagne was unveiled May 4, 2004 at Meze restaurant in Charlestown before being permanently installed outside of the Agganis Arena at Boston University on the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Harry Agganis Way, formerly Gaffney Street. Aristotle George (Harry) Agganis (SED '54), "The Golden Greek" was a native of Lynn, Massachusetts and a football and baseball standout for the Boston University Terriers. After a sophomore season in 1949 in which he set a school record with fifteen touchdown passes, Harry entered the Marine Corps where he served fifteen months during the Korean War. Returning to college in 1951, he became the school's first All-American, setting the school record for 1,402 yards passing and winning the Bulger Lowe Award as New England's outstanding football player. That year, as a first baseman, he hit .322. Following his junior season, he was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the first round of the 1952 NFL Draft, but instead signed to play first base for the Boston Red Sox for $35,000. Following his 1953 graduation, Agganis played with AAA Louisville before making his major league debut in 1954. As a rookie, he was a standout defensive player. In his second season, he got off to a good start, hitting .313 in his first 25 games before being hospitalized with pneumonia on June 2. He rejoined the team, but fell ill again in Kansas City on June 27 and was flown back to Cambridge, where he died of a pulmonary embolism at the age of 26. Agganis was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Agganis Arena, located at 925 Commonwealth Avenue, was dedicated in 2004 and opened on January 3, 2005 when the the Boston Terriers ice hockey team defeated the Minnesota Golden Gophers by a score of 2-1 on Jack Parker Rink, named after the college hockey's winningest head coach who has guided the team since 1973. Ironically, the Terriers had lost by the very same score to the same team the day before in their old arena, the legendary Walter Brown Arena. Agganis Arena is a 29,000 square foot venue with 6,300 seats that expands to over 7,2000 seats for concerts and other events. In addition to serving as the home to the Boston University Terriers ice hockey team, is hosts BU basketball games, concerts, regional athletic tournaments, trade shows and other Boston University events. The arena is part of Boston University's John Hancock Student Village, or StuVi, a $225-million, 10-acre residential and recreational complex between Buick Street and Nickerson Field on ground formerly occupied by a National Guard Armory.
Boston University: Agganis Arena - Harry Agganis statue The portrait statue of Harry Agganis by sculptor Armand LaMontagne was unveiled May 4, 2004 at Meze restaurant in Charlestown before being permanently installed outside of the Agganis Arena at Boston University on the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Harry Agganis Way, formerly Gaffney Street. Aristotle George (Harry) Agganis (SED '54), "The Golden Greek" was a native of Lynn, Massachusetts and a football and baseball standout for the Boston University Terriers. After a sophomore season in 1949 in which he set a school record with fifteen touchdown passes, Harry entered the Marine Corps where he served fifteen months during the Korean War. Returning to college in 1951, he became the school's first All-American, setting the school record for 1,402 yards passing and winning the Bulger Lowe Award as New England's outstanding football player. That year, as a first baseman, he hit .322. Following his junior season, he was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the first round of the 1952 NFL Draft, but instead signed to play first base for the Boston Red Sox for $35,000. Following his 1953 graduation, Agganis played with AAA Louisville before making his major league debut in 1954. As a rookie, he was a standout defensive player. In his second season, he got off to a good start, hitting .313 in his first 25 games before being hospitalized with pneumonia on June 2. He rejoined the team, but fell ill again in Kansas City on June 27 and was flown back to Cambridge, where he died of a pulmonary embolism at the age of 26. Agganis was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Agganis Arena, located at 925 Commonwealth Avenue, was dedicated in 2004 and opened on January 3, 2005 when the the Boston Terriers ice hockey team defeated the Minnesota Golden Gophers by a score of 2-1 on Jack Parker Rink, named after the college hockey's winningest head coach who has guided the team since 1973. Ironically, the Terriers had lost by the very same score to the same team the day before in their old arena, the legendary Walter Brown Arena. Agganis Arena is a 29,000 square foot venue with 6,300 seats that expands to over 7,2000 seats for concerts and other events. In addition to serving as the home to the Boston University Terriers ice hockey team, is hosts BU basketball games, concerts, regional athletic tournaments, trade shows and other Boston University events. The arena is part of Boston University's John Hancock Student Village, or StuVi, a $225-million, 10-acre residential and recreational complex between Buick Street and Nickerson Field on ground formerly occupied by a National Guard Armory.
Boston University: Agganis Arena - Harry Agganis statue The portrait statue of Harry Agganis by sculptor Armand LaMontagne was unveiled May 4, 2004 at Meze restaurant in Charlestown before being permanently installed outside of the Agganis Arena at Boston University on the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Harry Agganis Way, formerly Gaffney Street. Aristotle George (Harry) Agganis (SED '54), "The Golden Greek" was a native of Lynn, Massachusetts and a football and baseball standout for the Boston University Terriers. After a sophomore season in 1949 in which he set a school record with fifteen touchdown passes, Harry entered the Marine Corps where he served fifteen months during the Korean War. Returning to college in 1951, he became the school's first All-American, setting the school record for 1,402 yards passing and winning the Bulger Lowe Award as New England's outstanding football player. That year, as a first baseman, he hit .322. Following his junior season, he was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the first round of the 1952 NFL Draft, but instead signed to play first base for the Boston Red Sox for $35,000. Following his 1953 graduation, Agganis played with AAA Louisville before making his major league debut in 1954. As a rookie, he was a standout defensive player. In his second season, he got off to a good start, hitting .313 in his first 25 games before being hospitalized with pneumonia on June 2. He rejoined the team, but fell ill again in Kansas City on June 27 and was flown back to Cambridge, where he died of a pulmonary embolism at the age of 26. Agganis was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Agganis Arena, located at 925 Commonwealth Avenue, was dedicated in 2004 and opened on January 3, 2005 when the the Boston Terriers ice hockey team defeated the Minnesota Golden Gophers by a score of 2-1 on Jack Parker Rink, named after the college hockey's winningest head coach who has guided the team since 1973. Ironically, the Terriers had lost by the very same score to the same team the day before in their old arena, the legendary Walter Brown Arena. Agganis Arena is a 29,000 square foot venue with 6,300 seats that expands to over 7,2000 seats for concerts and other events. In addition to serving as the home to the Boston University Terriers ice hockey team, is hosts BU basketball games, concerts, regional athletic tournaments, trade shows and other Boston University events. The arena is part of Boston University's John Hancock Student Village, or StuVi, a $225-million, 10-acre residential and recreational complex between Buick Street and Nickerson Field on ground formerly occupied by a National Guard Armory.
NYC - LES: Bowery Station Bowery, a New York City subway station on the BMT Nassau Street Line located at the intersection of the Bowery and Delancey Street, is served by the J train at all times and the Z train rush hours in the peak direction. Opened on August 4, 1913, it features 4 tracks--2 in revenue service, and 2 island platforms. Bowery, commonly called The Bower is the name of both a street and a small neighborhood. Bowery is an anglicisation of the Dutch bouwerij, derived from an antiquated Dutch word for "farm." In the 17th century the road branched off Broadway north of Fort Amsterdam at the tip of Manhattan to the homestead of Peter Stuyvesant, Director-General of New Netherland. As a street, the Bowery was known as Bowery Lane prior to 1807. Today it runs from Chatham Square in the south to Cooper Square at 4th Street in the north.
NYC - LES: Orchard Street 130 Orchard Street features prominent signage for S[amuel] Beckenstein Draperies, who is said to be the inspiration for the 1932 novelty song "Sam, You Made the Pants Too Long." Beckenstein ran a popular fabric and clothing store here for years.
NYC - LES: Essex Market - Jeffrey's School of Butchery At Jeffrey's School of Butchery, 4th generation butcher Jeffrey Ruhalter offers demonstrations on basic butchering and a complete breakdown of Pork, Beef, Lamb, and Fowl in a series of classes. The beef demonstration class is held the second saturday of each month. Jeffrey's Meats, the oldest original family butcher on the Lower East Side has proudly served the community for over 75 years. Four generations after Allen Rhuhalter started his business, his great-grandson carries on the family tradition of providing customers with quality meet, good value and customized service. Originally located at 188 Orchard Street in 1929, Jeffrey's Meats has been operating in the Essex Street Market, currently at booth 36, since the Market opened for business in 1940. The Essex Street Market began in 1940 as part of an effort by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia to find a new place for street merchants to do business. At the time, pushcarts and vendors crowded the streets, making it difficult for police and fire vehicles to pass. To ease congetion, LaGuardia created this and several other indoor markets. In the early years, Essex Street Market's identity was shaped by the Lower East Side's Jewish and Italian immigrants. Beyond its function as a shopping destination, the Market also developed into a social environment. When a new Puerto Rican population shifted the neighborhood demographics in the 1950s, the Market grew quickyl. In the 1970s, the Market began to fall out of favor as many customers turned to more convenient supermarkets. After years of being run cooperatively by merchants, a 20-year lease expired in 1986. In 1992, a private developer took over andafter failing to achieve its development vision, handed over control to the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC). In 1995, the NYCEDC commenced a $1.5 million renovation and consolidation.
NYC - LES: Essex Market - Jeffrey's School of Butchery At Jeffrey's School of Butchery, 4th generation butcher Jeffrey Ruhalter offers demonstrations on basic butchering and a complete breakdown of Pork, Beef, Lamb, and Fowl in a series of classes. The beef demonstration class is held the second saturday of each month. Jeffrey's Meats, the oldest original family butcher on the Lower East Side has proudly served the community for over 75 years. Four generations after Allen Rhuhalter started his business, his great-grandson carries on the family tradition of providing customers with quality meet, good value and customized service. Originally located at 188 Orchard Street in 1929, Jeffrey's Meats has been operating in the Essex Street Market, currently at booth 36, since the Market opened for business in 1940. The Essex Street Market began in 1940 as part of an effort by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia to find a new place for street merchants to do business. At the time, pushcarts and vendors crowded the streets, making it difficult for police and fire vehicles to pass. To ease congetion, LaGuardia created this and several other indoor markets. In the early years, Essex Street Market's identity was shaped by the Lower East Side's Jewish and Italian immigrants. Beyond its function as a shopping destination, the Market also developed into a social environment. When a new Puerto Rican population shifted the neighborhood demographics in the 1950s, the Market grew quickyl. In the 1970s, the Market began to fall out of favor as many customers turned to more convenient supermarkets. After years of being run cooperatively by merchants, a 20-year lease expired in 1986. In 1992, a private developer took over andafter failing to achieve its development vision, handed over control to the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC). In 1995, the NYCEDC commenced a $1.5 million renovation and consolidation.
NYC - LES: Essex Market - Jeffrey's School of Butchery At Jeffrey's School of Butchery, 4th generation butcher Jeffrey Ruhalter offers demonstrations on basic butchering and a complete breakdown of Pork, Beef, Lamb, and Fowl in a series of classes. The beef demonstration class is held the second saturday of each month. Jeffrey's Meats, the oldest original family butcher on the Lower East Side has proudly served the community for over 75 years. Four generations after Allen Rhuhalter started his business, his great-grandson carries on the family tradition of providing customers with quality meet, good value and customized service. Originally located at 188 Orchard Street in 1929, Jeffrey's Meats has been operating in the Essex Street Market, currently at booth 36, since the Market opened for business in 1940. The Essex Street Market began in 1940 as part of an effort by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia to find a new place for street merchants to do business. At the time, pushcarts and vendors crowded the streets, making it difficult for police and fire vehicles to pass. To ease congetion, LaGuardia created this and several other indoor markets. In the early years, Essex Street Market's identity was shaped by the Lower East Side's Jewish and Italian immigrants. Beyond its function as a shopping destination, the Market also developed into a social environment. When a new Puerto Rican population shifted the neighborhood demographics in the 1950s, the Market grew quickyl. In the 1970s, the Market began to fall out of favor as many customers turned to more convenient supermarkets. After years of being run cooperatively by merchants, a 20-year lease expired in 1986. In 1992, a private developer took over andafter failing to achieve its development vision, handed over control to the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC). In 1995, the NYCEDC commenced a $1.5 million renovation and consolidation
Boston - Park Street Station: Celebration of the Underground Celebration of the Underground a ceramic, glass, metal and mixed media mural by Lilli Ann Killen Rosenberg, commemorates the openeing of the first American subway at Park Street in Boston. Park Street Station of the MBTA, located at the intersection of Park Street and Tremont Street in Boston at a corner of Boston Common, is the main transfer point between the Green Line and the Red Line. Throughout the green and red lines, trains labeled "inbound" are headed towards this station, while those labeled "outbound" are headed away. The Green Line portion of this station was originally constructed in 1897, making it one of the two oldest subway stations in the United States, along with Boylston. The Red Line portion beneath it, sometimes called Park Street Under, was constructed in 1912.
Boston - Park Street Station: Celebration of the Underground Celebration of the Underground a ceramic, glass, metal and mixed media mural by Lilli Ann Killen Rosenberg, commemorates the openeing of the first American subway at Park Street in Boston. Park Street Station of the MBTA, located at the intersection of Park Street and Tremont Street in Boston at a corner of Boston Common, is the main transfer point between the Green Line and the Red Line. Throughout the green and red lines, trains labeled "inbound" are headed towards this station, while those labeled "outbound" are headed away. The Green Line portion of this station was originally constructed in 1897, making it one of the two oldest subway stations in the United States, along with Boylston. The Red Line portion beneath it, sometimes called Park Street Under, was constructed in 1912.
Boston - Public Garden: George Robert White Memorial The George Robert White Memorial, also known as the Spirit of Giving or The Angels of the Waters, located in the northeast corner of Boston Public Garden, was designed by Daniel Chester French in 1924. The 6-foot bronze sculpture, an allegorical winged female figure, sits atop a rockport granite base installed in an elliptical-shaped pebble and granite fountain design by architect, Henry Bacon. The statue commemorates George Robert White (1847-1922), a Boston resident who made a fortune in the wholesale drug and chemistry business with his corporation Potter Drug and Chemical Company and became one of the City's foremost philanthropists. The Boston Public Garden, established in 1837, was the first public botanical garden in the United States. The twenty-four acre landscape, which was once a salt marsh, was designed by George V. Meacham. In 1859, an act by the Massachusetts General Court preserved the Public Garden as an open space. Together with the Boston Common, these two parks form the northern terminus of the Emerald Necklace, a long string of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. While the Common is primarily unstructured open space, the Public Garden contains a lake and a large series of formal plantings that are maintained by the city and others and vary from season to season. During the warmer seasons, the four acre pond is usually the home of one or more swans and is always the site of the Swan Boats, a famous Boston tourist attraction. Several statues are located throughout the Public Garden. Located at the Arlington Street gate is the equestrian statue of George Washington, which faces Commonwealth Avenue. A set of bronze statues based on the main characters from the children's story Make Way For Ducklings is located between the pond and the Charles and Beacon streets entrance. There is also a statue commemorating the first use of ether as an anesthetic. National Register #87000761 (1987)
Boston - Public Garden: George Robert White Memorial The George Robert White Memorial, also known as the Spirit of Giving or The Angels of the Waters, located in the northeast corner of Boston Public Garden, was designed by Daniel Chester French in 1924. The 6-foot bronze sculpture, an allegorical winged female figure, sits atop a rockport granite base installed in an elliptical-shaped pebble and granite fountain design by architect, Henry Bacon. The statue commemorates George Robert White (1847-1922), a Boston resident who made a fortune in the wholesale drug and chemistry business with his corporation Potter Drug and Chemical Company and became one of the City's foremost philanthropists. The Boston Public Garden, established in 1837, was the first public botanical garden in the United States. The twenty-four acre landscape, which was once a salt marsh, was designed by George V. Meacham. In 1859, an act by the Massachusetts General Court preserved the Public Garden as an open space. Together with the Boston Common, these two parks form the northern terminus of the Emerald Necklace, a long string of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. While the Common is primarily unstructured open space, the Public Garden contains a lake and a large series of formal plantings that are maintained by the city and others and vary from season to season. During the warmer seasons, the four acre pond is usually the home of one or more swans and is always the site of the Swan Boats, a famous Boston tourist attraction. Several statues are located throughout the Public Garden. Located at the Arlington Street gate is the equestrian statue of George Washington, which faces Commonwealth Avenue. A set of bronze statues based on the main characters from the children's story Make Way For Ducklings is located between the pond and the Charles and Beacon streets entrance. There is also a statue commemorating the first use of ether as an anesthetic. National Register #87000761 (1987)
Boston - Public Garden: The Ether Monument: The Good Samaritan The Ether Monument: The Good Samaritan, designed by sculptor John Quincy Adams Ward and architect Henry Van Brunt, was dedicated on September 26, 1868 in Boston Public Garden near Arlington and Beacon Streets. The monument was commissioned by Thomas Lee and commemorates the discovery ether and its use as an anesthetic in surgery performed at Massachusetts General Hospital October 16, 1846. The Boston Public Garden, established in 1837, was the first public botanical garden in the United States. The twenty-four acre landscape, which was once a salt marsh, was designed by George V. Meacham. In 1859, an act by the Massachusetts General Court preserved the Public Garden as an open space. Together with the Boston Common, these two parks form the northern terminus of the Emerald Necklace, a long string of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. While the Common is primarily unstructured open space, the Public Garden contains a lake and a large series of formal plantings that are maintained by the city and others and vary from season to season. During the warmer seasons, the four acre pond is usually the home of one or more swans and is always the site of the Swan Boats, a famous Boston tourist attraction. Several statues are located throughout the Public Garden. Located at the Arlington Street gate is the equestrian statue of George Washington, which faces Commonwealth Avenue. A set of bronze statues based on the main characters from the children's story Make Way For Ducklings is located between the pond and the Charles and Beacon streets entrance. National Register #87000761 (1987)
Boston - Public Garden: The Ether Monument: The Good Samaritan The Ether Monument: The Good Samaritan, designed by sculptor John Quincy Adams Ward and architect Henry Van Brunt, was dedicated on September 26, 1868 in Boston Public Garden near Arlington and Beacon Streets. The monument was commissioned by Thomas Lee and commemorates the discovery ether and its use as an anesthetic in surgery performed at Massachusetts General Hospital October 16, 1846. The Boston Public Garden, established in 1837, was the first public botanical garden in the United States. The twenty-four acre landscape, which was once a salt marsh, was designed by George V. Meacham. In 1859, an act by the Massachusetts General Court preserved the Public Garden as an open space. Together with the Boston Common, these two parks form the northern terminus of the Emerald Necklace, a long string of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. While the Common is primarily unstructured open space, the Public Garden contains a lake and a large series of formal plantings that are maintained by the city and others and vary from season to season. During the warmer seasons, the four acre pond is usually the home of one or more swans and is always the site of the Swan Boats, a famous Boston tourist attraction. Several statues are located throughout the Public Garden. Located at the Arlington Street gate is the equestrian statue of George Washington, which faces Commonwealth Avenue. A set of bronze statues based on the main characters from the children's story Make Way For Ducklings is located between the pond and the Charles and Beacon streets entrance. National Register #87000761 (1987)
Boston - Public Garden: Swan Boat and Swan's Nest The Swan Boats that glide through the lagoon of the Boston Public Garden date back to 1877, when Robert Paget introduced rides on foot-peddled paddle wheel catamaran. The original fleet was comprised of single-seaters that could carry eight. Paget died just a year later, but his wife Julia preserved the family business through the early 1900's, when her son John took over in 1914, and his son, Paul, took over in 1969. Today's fleet consists of six boats, the oldest of which was built by John in 1918, with five or six benches per boat, carrying up to 20 passengers. The Boston Public Garden, established in 1837, was the first public botanical garden in the United States. The twenty-four acre landscape, which was once a salt marsh, was designed by George V. Meacham. In 1859, an act by the Massachusetts General Court preserved the Public Garden as an open space. Together with the Boston Common, these two parks form the northern terminus of the Emerald Necklace, a long string of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. While the Common is primarily unstructured open space, the Public Garden contains a lake and a large series of formal plantings that are maintained by the city and others and vary from season to season. Several statues are located throughout the Public Garden. Located at the Arlington Street gate is the equestrian statue of George Washington, which faces Commonwealth Avenue. A set of bronze statues based on the main characters from the children's story Make Way For Ducklings is located between the pond and the Charles and Beacon streets entrance. There is also a statue commemorating the first use of ether as an anesthetic. National Register #87000761 (1987)
Boston - Public Garden: George Washington and Small Child Fountain The equestrian statue of George Washington, modeled by sculptor Thomas Ball in 1864, was cast and dedicated at the west end of Boston Public Garden in 1869. Funding began with a "Washington Statue Fair" organized in November of 1859. The fair raised $10,000 toward the total cost of $42,000 and Public subscription funded all but $10,000, which was later contributed by the City of Boston. After delays caused by the Civil War and the artist's stay in Italy, the 22-foot bronze statue was finally dedicated in 1869. The Small Child fountain, cast in 1929 by Mary E. Moore, was a gift of Mrs. Alfred Tozzer to the City of Boston and sits in the shadows of the Washington statue. The Public Garden was established in 1837 and was the first public botanical garden in the United States. The twenty-four acre (97,000 m²) landscape, which was once a salt marsh, was designed by George V. Meacham. In 1859, an act by the Massachusetts General Court preserved the Public Garden as an open space. Together with the Boston Common, these two parks form the northern terminus of the Emerald Necklace, a long string of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. While the Common is primarily unstructured open space, the Public Garden contains a lake and a large series of formal plantings that are maintained by the city and others and vary from season to season. During the warmer seasons, the four acre (16,000 m²) pond is usually the home of one or more swans and is always the site of the Swan Boats, a famous Boston tourist attraction. Several statues are located throughout the Public Garden. Located at the Arlington Street gate is the equestrian statue of George Washington, which faces Commonwealth Avenue. A set of bronze statues based on the main characters from the children's story Make Way For Ducklings is located between the pond and the Charles and Beacon streets entrance. There is also a statute commemorating the first use of ether as an anesthetic. The Public Garden is roughly rectangular in shape and is bounded on the south by Boylston Street, on the west by Arlington Street, and on the north by Beacon Street where it faces Beacon Hill. On its east side, Charles Street divides the Public Garden from the Common. The greenway connecting the Public Garden with the rest of the Emerald necklace is the strip of park that runs west down the center of Commonwealth Avenue towards the Back Bay Fens and the Muddy River. Boston Public Garden National Register #87000761
Boston - Public Garden: Small Child Fountain The Small Child fountain, cast in 1929 by Mary E. Moore, was a gift of Mrs. Alfred Tozzer to the City of Boston and sits in Boston Public Garden along Arlington Street. The Public Garden was established in 1837 and was the first public botanical garden in the United States. The twenty-four acre (97,000 m²) landscape, which was once a salt marsh, was designed by George V. Meacham. In 1859, an act by the Massachusetts General Court preserved the Public Garden as an open space. Together with the Boston Common, these two parks form the northern terminus of the Emerald Necklace, a long string of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. While the Common is primarily unstructured open space, the Public Garden contains a lake and a large series of formal plantings that are maintained by the city and others and vary from season to season. During the warmer seasons, the four acre (16,000 m²) pond is usually the home of one or more swans and is always the site of the Swan Boats, a famous Boston tourist attraction. Several statues are located throughout the Public Garden. Located at the Arlington Street gate is the equestrian statue of George Washington, which faces Commonwealth Avenue. A set of bronze statues based on the main characters from the children's story Make Way For Ducklings is located between the pond and the Charles and Beacon streets entrance. There is also a statute commemorating the first use of ether as an anesthetic. The Public Garden is roughly rectangular in shape and is bounded on the south by Boylston Street, on the west by Arlington Street, and on the north by Beacon Street where it faces Beacon Hill. On its east side, Charles Street divides the Public Garden from the Common. The greenway connecting the Public Garden with the rest of the Emerald necklace is the strip of park that runs west down the center of Commonwealth Avenue towards the Back Bay Fens and the Muddy River. Boston Public Garden National Register #87000761
Boston - Public Garden: George Washington The equestrian statue of George Washington, modeled by sculptor Thomas Ball in 1864, was cast and dedicated at the west end of Boston Public Garden in 1869. Funding began with a "Washington Statue Fair" organized in November of 1859. The fair raised $10,000 toward the total cost of $42,000 and Public subscription funded all but $10,000, which was later contributed by the City of Boston. After delays caused by the Civil War and the artist's stay in Italy, the 22-foot bronze statue was finally dedicated in 1869. The Public Garden was established in 1837 and was the first public botanical garden in the United States. The twenty-four acre (97,000 m²) landscape, which was once a salt marsh, was designed by George V. Meacham. In 1859, an act by the Massachusetts General Court preserved the Public Garden as an open space. Together with the Boston Common, these two parks form the northern terminus of the Emerald Necklace, a long string of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. While the Common is primarily unstructured open space, the Public Garden contains a lake and a large series of formal plantings that are maintained by the city and others and vary from season to season. During the warmer seasons, the four acre (16,000 m²) pond is usually the home of one or more swans and is always the site of the Swan Boats, a famous Boston tourist attraction. Several statues are located throughout the Public Garden. Located at the Arlington Street gate is the equestrian statue of George Washington, which faces Commonwealth Avenue. A set of bronze statues based on the main characters from the children's story Make Way For Ducklings is located between the pond and the Charles and Beacon streets entrance. There is also a statute commemorating the first use of ether as an anesthetic. The Public Garden is roughly rectangular in shape and is bounded on the south by Boylston Street, on the west by Arlington Street, and on the north by Beacon Street where it faces Beacon Hill. On its east side, Charles Street divides the Public Garden from the Common. The greenway connecting the Public Garden with the rest of the Emerald necklace is the strip of park that runs west down the center of Commonwealth Avenue towards the Back Bay Fens and the Muddy River. Boston Public Garden National Register #87000761
NYC - NoLita: Lombardi's Pizzeria According to documented history, Lombardi's was the first American pizzeria. Pizza didn't gain its popularity until just after World War II, but Lombardi's, opened by Gennaro Lombardi, began selling pizza in New York City in 1905, so you might say Gennaro is the father of American pizza. Lombardi's was originally a grocery store, but it soon became a popular stop for workers looking for something to take to work for lunch. Gennaro started selling tomato pies, which were wrapped in paper and tied with a string, and the many workers of Italian descent would take them to the job site. Most could not afford the entire pie, so it was often sold by the piece. There was no set price or size, so you asked for whatever lets say 2 cents would buy and you were given portion of what was equal to the amount offered. Gennaro's son, John, took over after Gennaro passed away and the business eventually went to Genarro's grandson, Jerry. Over the years, Lombardi's continued to sell pizza, becoming a cult-like Mecca for pizza enthusiasts. In 1984, Lombardi's closed its doors. In 1994, John Brescio, who was a childhood friend of Gennaro's grandson, Jerry, started talking to Jerry about reopening Lombardi's and in that same year they did, but not in the same location. They moved a block down the street to 32 Spring Street.
NYC - Little Italy: Torrisi Italian Specialties - Rainbow Cookies

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