Вход в личный кабинет
Логин (не зарегистрированы?):
Пароль (забыли?):
Также можно войти, используя:
Google Яндекс Yahoo
Войти

Фото, сделанные другими фотоаппаратами Canon:

Список всех фотокамер →

Фото, сделанные Canon EOS 300D DIGITAL (Canon)

Алёша 12 10 12
barun-vranicany
Роза Пигаль 85
Image3
Image2
Image1
1 (36)
imgB
wool texture4840
Аэросъемка (5)
The Gold Mask of TUTANKHAMUN. Carter 256a. Egyptian Museum Cairo ©Hans Ollermann CARTER 256a. Relevant Burton photo’s, as found in the Howard Carter Archives in Griffith Institute at Oxford University, are: 749-760,769, 1547,616-618, 1620 and 1699-1700. JE 60672. Exhib. 220.
The Gold Mask of TUTANKHAMUN. Carter 256a. Egyptian Museum Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann Relevant Burton photo’s, as found in the Howard Carter Archives in Griffith Institute at Oxford University, are: 749-760,769, 1547,616-618, 1620 and 1699-1700. JE 60672. Exhib. 220.
Detail of the Second Shrine from the Burial Chamber of the Tomb of TUTANKHAMUN. Carter 237. Egyptian Museum, Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann.
Sticks from the Tomb of TUTANKHAMUN. Carter 48c and 50uu. Egyptian Museum Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann Stick with crook composed of bound African prisoner. CARTER 48c BURTON 335 JE 61736; Exhib. 179 and Ceremonial stick of unknown use (detail). CARTER 50uu BURTON 338-341. JE 61732; Exhib. 175
Ritual figure of Menkaret supporting King TUTANKHAMUN (as mummified Pharaoh). Egyptian Museum, Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann This superb statue of a mummified TUTANKHAMUN survived at least two burglaries some 3300 years ago, when the tomb of the king in the Valley of the Kings was visited by tomb robbers. Weather the statue has survived the looting and vandalism in January 28, 2011, during which it disappeared in the Egyptian Museum at Tahrir Square (Cairo), is uncertain. It has not been recovered. Probably it is still in criminal hands at this very moment. It was part of a statue of Menkaret who carried the mummified Tutankhamun, but it was brooken off by the looters and disappeared following the looting and vandalism that happened in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, on January 28, 2011. Only the statue of Menkaret is recovered (brutally damaged), and restored by the museum. New Kingdom, dynasty 18. Reign of Tutankhamun Nebkhepure. Around 1336-1327 BC. Wood, Gold, Gesso and Glass. Provenance: Tomb of Tutankhamun, Valley of the Kings (Biban el-Muluk), Thebes-West. KV62. It was excavated by Howard Carter for Lord Carnarven in 1922. Carter 296a. Relevant Burton photo’s, as found in the Howard Carter Archives in Griffith Institute at Oxford University, are: 1014, 1014a, 1014b, 1768, 1786. Reeves -The Complete Tutankhamun, p.131. JE 60716. Exhib. 408. Egyptian Museum Cairo.
Ornamental alabaster unguent vase upon trellis table stand, from the Tomb of Tutankhamun, Carter 57. Egyptian Museum Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann Carter 57 Relevant Burton photo’s as found in Howard Carter Archives in the unsurpassed Griffith Institute Oxford are 468, 475-477 and 1641. JE 62116. Exh. 6.
Detail of the Painted Wooden Chest, found in the Northeast Corner of the Antechamber of the Tomb of TUTANKHAMUN. Carter 21. Egyptian Museum Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann Carter 21. Relevant Burton photo’s, as found in the Howard Carter Archives in Griffith Institute at Oxford University, are: 76, 78-81, 1468, 1611 and 1807-1818. JE 61467 Exh.324
Detail of the Exquisite Alabaster Basin with Boat from the Tomb of TUTANKHAMUN, Carter 578. Egyptian Museum Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann Carter 578. Relevant Burton photo’s as found in Howard Carter Archives in the unsurpassed Griffith Institute Oxford are 1222, 1257, 1258-1260, 1570 and 1644-1649. Reeves- The Complete Tutankhamun, p.199. JE 62120 Exh. 635
Composite unguent vase from Tomb of TUTANKHAMUN, detail. Carter 360. Egyptian Museum, Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann. Alabaster. Carter 360. Relevant Burton photo’s as found in Howard Carter Archives in the unsurpassed Griffith Institute Oxford are 1615, 1651 and 1652. JE 62113. Exh.nr. 748.
Detail of the Exquisite Alabaster Basin with Boat from the Tomb of TUTANKHAMUN, Carter 578. Egyptian Museum Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann Carter 578. Relevant Burton photo’s as found in Howard Carter Archives in the unsurpassed Griffith Institute Oxford are 1222, 1257, 1258-1260, 1570 and 1644-1649. Reeves- The Complete Tutankhamun, p.199. JE 62120 Exh. 635
Detail of the Exquisite Alabaster Basin with Boat from the Tomb of TUTANKHAMUN, Carter 578. Egyptian Museum Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann Carter 578. Relevant Burton photo’s, as found in the Howard Carter Archives in Griffith Institute at Oxford University, are: 1222,1257,1258-1260,1570 and 1644-1649. JE 62120 Exh. 635
Detail of the Throne of TUTANKHAMUN. Carter 91. Egyptian Museum, Cairo :copyright: Hans Ollermann Tutankhamun was an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (ruled ca. 1332–1323 BC in the conventional chronology), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom. He is popularly referred to as King Tut. His original name, Tutankhaten, means "Living Image of Aten", while Tutankhamun means "Living Image of Amun". In hieroglyphs, the name Tutankhamun was typically written Amen-tut-ankh, because of a scribal custom that placed a divine name at the beginning of a phrase to show appropriate reverence. He is possibly also the Nibhurrereya of the Amarna letters, and likely the 18th dynasty king Rathotis who, according to Manetho, an ancient historian, had reigned for nine years—a figure that conforms with Flavius Josephus's version of Manetho's Epitome. The 1922 discovery by Howard Carter and George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon of Tutankhamun's nearly intact tomb received worldwide press coverage. It sparked a renewed public interest in ancient Egypt, for which Tutankhamun's burial mask, now in Cairo Museum, remains the popular symbol. Exhibits of artifacts from his tomb have toured the world. In February 2010, the results of DNA tests confirmed that he was the son of Akhenaten (mummy KV55) and Akhenaten's sister and wife (mummy KV35YL), whose name is unknown but whose remains are positively identified as "The Younger Lady" mummy found in KV35. Life Tutankhamun was the son of Akhenaten (formerly Amenhotep IV) and one of Akhenaten's sisters, or perhaps one of his cousins. As a prince he was known as Tutankhaten. He ascended to the throne in 1333 BC, at the age of nine or ten, taking the throne name Nebkheperure. His wet-nurse was a woman called Maia, known from her tomb at Saqqara. A teacher was most likely Sennedjem. When he became king, he married his half-sister, Ankhesenpaaten, who later changed her name to Ankhesenamun. They had two daughters, both stillborn. Computed tomography studies released in 2011 revealed that one daughter died at 5–6 months of pregnancy and the other at 9 months of pregnancy. No evidence was found in either mummy of congenital anomalies or an apparent cause of death. Reign Given his age, the king probably had very powerful advisers, presumably including General Horemheb and the Vizier Ay. Horemheb records that the king appointed him "lord of the land" as hereditary prince to maintain law. He also noted his ability to calm the young king when his temper flared. In his third regnal year, Tutankhamun reversed several changes made during his father's reign. He ended the worship of the god Aten and restored the god Amun to supremacy. The ban on the cult of Amun was lifted and traditional privileges were restored to its priesthood. The capital was moved back to Thebes and the city of Akhetaten abandoned. This is when he changed his name to Tutankhamun, "Living image of Amun", reinforcing the restoration of Amun. As part of his restoration, the king initiated building projects, in particular at Thebes and Karnak, where he dedicated a temple to Amun. Many monuments were erected, and an inscription on his tomb door declares the king had "spent his life in fashioning the images of the gods". The traditional festivals were now celebrated again, including those related to the Apis Bull, Horemakhet, and Opet. His restoration stela says: The temples of the gods and goddesses ... were in ruins. Their shrines were deserted and overgrown. Their sanctuaries were as non-existent and their courts were used as roads ... the gods turned their backs upon this land ... If anyone made a prayer to a god for advice he would never respond. The country was economically weak and in turmoil following the reign of Akhenaten. Diplomatic relations with other kingdoms had been neglected, and Tutankhamun sought to restore them, in particular with the Mitanni. Evidence of his success is suggested by the gifts from various countries found in his tomb. Despite his efforts for improved relations, battles with Nubians and Asiatics were recorded in his mortuary temple at Thebes. His tomb contained body armor and folding stools appropriate for military campaigns. However, given his youth and physical disabilities, which seemed to require the use of a cane in order to walk (he died c. age 19), historians speculate that he did not personally take part in these battles. Health and appearance Tutankhamun was slight of build, and was roughly 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) tall. He had large front incisors and the overbite characteristic of the Thutmosid royal line to which he belonged. Between September 2007 and October 2009, various mummies were subjected to detailed anthropological, radiological,
Detail of the First Ritual Couch, adorned with lioness heads (goddess Sekhmet, Carter 35) CARTER 35. Relevant Burton photo’s, as found in the Howard Carter Archives in Griffith Institute at Oxford University, are: 6,7,9,17-21,24,26,38-40,512,1695 and 2009. JE 62011. Exhib. 732 Tutankhamun was an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (ruled ca. 1332–1323 BC in the conventional chronology), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom. He is popularly referred to as King Tut. His original name, Tutankhaten, means "Living Image of Aten", while Tutankhamun means "Living Image of Amun". In hieroglyphs, the name Tutankhamun was typically written Amen-tut-ankh, because of a scribal custom that placed a divine name at the beginning of a phrase to show appropriate reverence. He is possibly also the Nibhurrereya of the Amarna letters, and likely the 18th dynasty king Rathotis who, according to Manetho, an ancient historian, had reigned for nine years—a figure that conforms with Flavius Josephus's version of Manetho's Epitome. The 1922 discovery by Howard Carter and George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon of Tutankhamun's nearly intact tomb received worldwide press coverage. It sparked a renewed public interest in ancient Egypt, for which Tutankhamun's burial mask, now in Cairo Museum, remains the popular symbol. Exhibits of artifacts from his tomb have toured the world. In February 2010, the results of DNA tests confirmed that he was the son of Akhenaten (mummy KV55) and Akhenaten's sister and wife (mummy KV35YL), whose name is unknown but whose remains are positively identified as "The Younger Lady" mummy found in KV35. Life Tutankhamun was the son of Akhenaten (formerly Amenhotep IV) and one of Akhenaten's sisters, or perhaps one of his cousins. As a prince he was known as Tutankhaten. He ascended to the throne in 1333 BC, at the age of nine or ten, taking the throne name Nebkheperure. His wet-nurse was a woman called Maia, known from her tomb at Saqqara. A teacher was most likely Sennedjem. When he became king, he married his half-sister, Ankhesenpaaten, who later changed her name to Ankhesenamun. They had two daughters, both stillborn. Computed tomography studies released in 2011 revealed that one daughter died at 5–6 months of pregnancy and the other at 9 months of pregnancy. No evidence was found in either mummy of congenital anomalies or an apparent cause of death. Reign Given his age, the king probably had very powerful advisers, presumably including General Horemheb and the Vizier Ay. Horemheb records that the king appointed him "lord of the land" as hereditary prince to maintain law. He also noted his ability to calm the young king when his temper flared. In his third regnal year, Tutankhamun reversed several changes made during his father's reign. He ended the worship of the god Aten and restored the god Amun to supremacy. The ban on the cult of Amun was lifted and traditional privileges were restored to its priesthood. The capital was moved back to Thebes and the city of Akhetaten abandoned. This is when he changed his name to Tutankhamun, "Living image of Amun", reinforcing the restoration of Amun. As part of his restoration, the king initiated building projects, in particular at Thebes and Karnak, where he dedicated a temple to Amun. Many monuments were erected, and an inscription on his tomb door declares the king had "spent his life in fashioning the images of the gods". The traditional festivals were now celebrated again, including those related to the Apis Bull, Horemakhet, and Opet. His restoration stela says: The temples of the gods and goddesses ... were in ruins. Their shrines were deserted and overgrown. Their sanctuaries were as non-existent and their courts were used as roads ... the gods turned their backs upon this land ... If anyone made a prayer to a god for advice he would never respond. The country was economically weak and in turmoil following the reign of Akhenaten. Diplomatic relations with other kingdoms had been neglected, and Tutankhamun sought to restore them, in particular with the Mitanni. Evidence of his success is suggested by the gifts from various countries found in his tomb. Despite his efforts for improved relations, battles with Nubians and Asiatics were recorded in his mortuary temple at Thebes. His tomb contained body armor and folding stools appropriate for military campaigns. However, given his youth and physical disabilities, which seemed to require the use of a cane in order to walk (he died c. age 19), historians speculate that he did not personally take part in these battles. Health and appearance Tutankhamun was slight of build, and was roughly 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) tall. He had large front incisors and the overbit
Life-sized Guardian Statue of TUTANKHAMUN, detail. Carter 22. From the North Wall of the Antechamber of his Tomb. CARTER 22. Relevant Burton photo’s, as found in the Howard Carter Archives in Griffith Institute at Oxford University, are: 6,7,16,17,280,281,292,293,320,321,491-496 and 498. JE 60707; Exhib. 96. Tutankhamun was an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (ruled ca. 1332–1323 BC in the conventional chronology), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom. He is popularly referred to as King Tut. His original name, Tutankhaten, means "Living Image of Aten", while Tutankhamun means "Living Image of Amun". In hieroglyphs, the name Tutankhamun was typically written Amen-tut-ankh, because of a scribal custom that placed a divine name at the beginning of a phrase to show appropriate reverence. He is possibly also the Nibhurrereya of the Amarna letters, and likely the 18th dynasty king Rathotis who, according to Manetho, an ancient historian, had reigned for nine years—a figure that conforms with Flavius Josephus's version of Manetho's Epitome. The 1922 discovery by Howard Carter and George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon of Tutankhamun's nearly intact tomb received worldwide press coverage. It sparked a renewed public interest in ancient Egypt, for which Tutankhamun's burial mask, now in Cairo Museum, remains the popular symbol. Exhibits of artifacts from his tomb have toured the world. In February 2010, the results of DNA tests confirmed that he was the son of Akhenaten (mummy KV55) and Akhenaten's sister and wife (mummy KV35YL), whose name is unknown but whose remains are positively identified as "The Younger Lady" mummy found in KV35. Life Tutankhamun was the son of Akhenaten (formerly Amenhotep IV) and one of Akhenaten's sisters, or perhaps one of his cousins. As a prince he was known as Tutankhaten. He ascended to the throne in 1333 BC, at the age of nine or ten, taking the throne name Nebkheperure. His wet-nurse was a woman called Maia, known from her tomb at Saqqara. A teacher was most likely Sennedjem. When he became king, he married his half-sister, Ankhesenpaaten, who later changed her name to Ankhesenamun. They had two daughters, both stillborn. Computed tomography studies released in 2011 revealed that one daughter died at 5–6 months of pregnancy and the other at 9 months of pregnancy. No evidence was found in either mummy of congenital anomalies or an apparent cause of death. Reign Given his age, the king probably had very powerful advisers, presumably including General Horemheb and the Vizier Ay. Horemheb records that the king appointed him "lord of the land" as hereditary prince to maintain law. He also noted his ability to calm the young king when his temper flared. In his third regnal year, Tutankhamun reversed several changes made during his father's reign. He ended the worship of the god Aten and restored the god Amun to supremacy. The ban on the cult of Amun was lifted and traditional privileges were restored to its priesthood. The capital was moved back to Thebes and the city of Akhetaten abandoned. This is when he changed his name to Tutankhamun, "Living image of Amun", reinforcing the restoration of Amun. As part of his restoration, the king initiated building projects, in particular at Thebes and Karnak, where he dedicated a temple to Amun. Many monuments were erected, and an inscription on his tomb door declares the king had "spent his life in fashioning the images of the gods". The traditional festivals were now celebrated again, including those related to the Apis Bull, Horemakhet, and Opet. His restoration stela says: The temples of the gods and goddesses ... were in ruins. Their shrines were deserted and overgrown. Their sanctuaries were as non-existent and their courts were used as roads ... the gods turned their backs upon this land ... If anyone made a prayer to a god for advice he would never respond. The country was economically weak and in turmoil following the reign of Akhenaten. Diplomatic relations with other kingdoms had been neglected, and Tutankhamun sought to restore them, in particular with the Mitanni. Evidence of his success is suggested by the gifts from various countries found in his tomb. Despite his efforts for improved relations, battles with Nubians and Asiatics were recorded in his mortuary temple at Thebes. His tomb contained body armor and folding stools appropriate for military campaigns. However, given his youth and physical disabilities, which seemed to require the use of a cane in order to walk (he died c. age 19), historians speculate that he did not personally take part in these battles. Health and appearance Tutankhamun was slight of build, and was roughly 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) tall. He had la
Life-sized Guardian Statue of TUTANKHAMUN, detail. Carter 22. Egyptian Museum Cairo :copyright:Hans Ollermann From the North Wall of the Antechamber of his Tomb. CARTER 22. Relevant Burton photo’s, as found in the Howard Carter Archives in Griffith Institute at Oxford University, are: 6,7,16,17,280,281,292,293,320,321,491-496 and 498. JE 60707; Exhib. 96. Tutankhamun was an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (ruled ca. 1332–1323 BC in the conventional chronology), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom. He is popularly referred to as King Tut. His original name, Tutankhaten, means "Living Image of Aten", while Tutankhamun means "Living Image of Amun". In hieroglyphs, the name Tutankhamun was typically written Amen-tut-ankh, because of a scribal custom that placed a divine name at the beginning of a phrase to show appropriate reverence. He is possibly also the Nibhurrereya of the Amarna letters, and likely the 18th dynasty king Rathotis who, according to Manetho, an ancient historian, had reigned for nine years—a figure that conforms with Flavius Josephus's version of Manetho's Epitome. The 1922 discovery by Howard Carter and George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon of Tutankhamun's nearly intact tomb received worldwide press coverage. It sparked a renewed public interest in ancient Egypt, for which Tutankhamun's burial mask, now in Cairo Museum, remains the popular symbol. Exhibits of artifacts from his tomb have toured the world. In February 2010, the results of DNA tests confirmed that he was the son of Akhenaten (mummy KV55) and Akhenaten's sister and wife (mummy KV35YL), whose name is unknown but whose remains are positively identified as "The Younger Lady" mummy found in KV35. Life Tutankhamun was the son of Akhenaten (formerly Amenhotep IV) and one of Akhenaten's sisters, or perhaps one of his cousins. As a prince he was known as Tutankhaten. He ascended to the throne in 1333 BC, at the age of nine or ten, taking the throne name Nebkheperure. His wet-nurse was a woman called Maia, known from her tomb at Saqqara. A teacher was most likely Sennedjem. When he became king, he married his half-sister, Ankhesenpaaten, who later changed her name to Ankhesenamun. They had two daughters, both stillborn. Computed tomography studies released in 2011 revealed that one daughter died at 5–6 months of pregnancy and the other at 9 months of pregnancy. No evidence was found in either mummy of congenital anomalies or an apparent cause of death. Reign Given his age, the king probably had very powerful advisers, presumably including General Horemheb and the Vizier Ay. Horemheb records that the king appointed him "lord of the land" as hereditary prince to maintain law. He also noted his ability to calm the young king when his temper flared. In his third regnal year, Tutankhamun reversed several changes made during his father's reign. He ended the worship of the god Aten and restored the god Amun to supremacy. The ban on the cult of Amun was lifted and traditional privileges were restored to its priesthood. The capital was moved back to Thebes and the city of Akhetaten abandoned. This is when he changed his name to Tutankhamun, "Living image of Amun", reinforcing the restoration of Amun. As part of his restoration, the king initiated building projects, in particular at Thebes and Karnak, where he dedicated a temple to Amun. Many monuments were erected, and an inscription on his tomb door declares the king had "spent his life in fashioning the images of the gods". The traditional festivals were now celebrated again, including those related to the Apis Bull, Horemakhet, and Opet. His restoration stela says: The temples of the gods and goddesses ... were in ruins. Their shrines were deserted and overgrown. Their sanctuaries were as non-existent and their courts were used as roads ... the gods turned their backs upon this land ... If anyone made a prayer to a god for advice he would never respond. The country was economically weak and in turmoil following the reign of Akhenaten. Diplomatic relations with other kingdoms had been neglected, and Tutankhamun sought to restore them, in particular with the Mitanni. Evidence of his success is suggested by the gifts from various countries found in his tomb. Despite his efforts for improved relations, battles with Nubians and Asiatics were recorded in his mortuary temple at Thebes. His tomb contained body armor and folding stools appropriate for military campaigns. However, given his youth and physical disabilities, which seemed to require the use of a cane in order to walk (he died c. age 19), historians speculate that he did not personally take part in these battles. Health and appearance Tutankhamun was slight of build, and
nikham01
ples07
0079 (Best Wallpapers)
1680x1050 (180)
1680x1050 (180)
airbus a321-231 - niki - oe-los - lemd
Аэросъемка (7)
пост 3 тг
kam kot

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10      

← Назад

@VFL_RU Uptime по данным Ping-Admin.Ru - сервиса мониторинга доступности сайтов
Версия для мобильных устройств.
Концепция, программирование и дизайн проекта — «Седжин».
© VFL.RU 2001–2020