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NYC - Chinatown - Mei Dick Barber Shop Mei Dick Barber Shop, at 37 Mott Street.
NYC - Chinatown - McDonald's
NYC - Chinatown - Vivi Bubble Tea
NYC - Chinatown - Vivi Bubble Tea
NYC - Chinatown - The Original Chinatown Ice Cream Factory The Chinatown Ice Cream Factory, at 65 Bayard Street, was established in 1978.
NYC - Chinatown - Hillary vs. Obama Explore: February 3, 2008
NYC - Chinatown - Fried Dumpling
NYC - Chinatown - New Beef King Corp. Hong Kong-native Robert Yee brought back his family recipe for beef jerky and opened his own beef jerky store at 89 Bayard Street in Chinatown. Yee doesn't dehydrate the meat--baking it slowly through 4 different temperature ovens, and then grilled.
NYC - Chinatown - Columbus Park This building was erected by the Department of Public Parks in 1897.
NYC - Chinatown: Lunar New Year Flower Market
NYC - Civic Center: Woolworth Building The Woolworth Building was built in 1911-1913 for the Woolworth retail chain company. Frank W. Woolworth bought the long-coveted tract of land on Broadway opposite City Hall Park in 1909 and hired Cass Gilbert as architect; Gilbert urged his client to make the new headquarters the tallest building in the world. Woolworth, in turn, influenced by his travels to Europe, wanted his architect to design it in neo-Gothic style. After several redesigns, one higher than the other, finally to exceed the rivalling Metropolitan Life Tower, the foundations were laid in August 1911 and, at the rate of one and a half storeys a week, the 60-storey building was completed two years later. Rising from a 27-storey base, with limestone and granite lower floors, the tower is clad in white terra-cotta and capped with an elaborate set-back Gothic top, with the spire rising to the height of 241.5 m. It was to be the tallest building in the world for 17 years, until the 40 Wall Street exceeded its height. The building boasts a highly decorated, three-storey marble lobby in the plan form of a latin cross, with semicircular arches, bronze ornaments and sculpted corbels on the walls (one of which represents Mr. Woolworth himself counting his dimes) and the vaulted ceiling decorated with glass mosaic in Byzantine style. No wonder the building was dubbed the "Cathedral of Commerce." The building was opened in April 1913 with a gala for 800 persons, and the building's lights were switched on by President Wilson from the White House in Washington, D.C. In 1980 the building exterior was restored to its original splendour, an assignment that cost more than the original construction work. The Woolworth chain eventually went out of business and its successor, the Venator Group, sold the building to the Witkoff Group for $155 million in June 1998. The NY University's School of Continuing and Professional Studies will expand to the first three office floors of the building (8,700 m²), with a separate entrance lobby on Barclay Street, equipped with new escalators. Also the top half of the building is facing new use, the space being converted into 145 luxury condominiums, designed by Costas Kondylis. In 2007, the Woolworth Building was ranked #44 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #66000554
NYC - Civic Center: Woolworth Building The Woolworth Building was built in 1911-1913 for the Woolworth retail chain company. Frank W. Woolworth bought the long-coveted tract of land on Broadway opposite City Hall Park in 1909 and hired Cass Gilbert as architect; Gilbert urged his client to make the new headquarters the tallest building in the world. Woolworth, in turn, influenced by his travels to Europe, wanted his architect to design it in neo-Gothic style. After several redesigns, one higher than the other, finally to exceed the rivalling Metropolitan Life Tower, the foundations were laid in August 1911 and, at the rate of one and a half storeys a week, the 60-storey building was completed two years later. Rising from a 27-storey base, with limestone and granite lower floors, the tower is clad in white terra-cotta and capped with an elaborate set-back Gothic top, with the spire rising to the height of 241.5 m. It was to be the tallest building in the world for 17 years, until the 40 Wall Street exceeded its height. The building boasts a highly decorated, three-storey marble lobby in the plan form of a latin cross, with semicircular arches, bronze ornaments and sculpted corbels on the walls (one of which represents Mr. Woolworth himself counting his dimes) and the vaulted ceiling decorated with glass mosaic in Byzantine style. No wonder the building was dubbed the "Cathedral of Commerce." The building was opened in April 1913 with a gala for 800 persons, and the building's lights were switched on by President Wilson from the White House in Washington, D.C. In 1980 the building exterior was restored to its original splendour, an assignment that cost more than the original construction work. The Woolworth chain eventually went out of business and its successor, the Venator Group, sold the building to the Witkoff Group for $155 million in June 1998. The NY University's School of Continuing and Professional Studies will expand to the first three office floors of the building (8,700 m
NYC: Fulton Street Subway Station The Fulton Street Subway Station, serving the 4-train and 5-train along IRT Lexington Avenue Line, is part of the Fulton Street/Broadway-Nassau Street station, linking to the BMT Nassau Street Line, the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line, and the IND Eighth Avenue Line. Opened on June 12, 1905 and designed by Heins & LaFarge, with egineer William B. Parsons, the Fulton Street Station crosses Fulton Street at Broadway. The southbound platforms incorporate an ornate entrance to the building at 195 Broadway, and the station features a mosaic of the steamboat built by Roert Fulton. The Fulton Street Subway Station was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1979.
NYC: Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall Subway Station The Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall Subway station, opened on October 27, 1904, serves the 4-train, 5-train, and 6-train along IRT Lexington Avenue Line. It functions as the south terminus for the 6-train, which turns via the City Hall loop. Artwork includes a 1996 work by Mark Gibian titled Cable Crossing. The Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall Subway station was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1979.
NYC: Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall Subway Station The Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall Subway station, opened on October 27, 1904, serves the 4-train, 5-train, and 6-train along IRT Lexington Avenue Line. It functions as the south terminus for the 6-train, which turns via the City Hall loop. Artwork includes a 1996 work by Mark Gibian titled Cable Crossing. The Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall Subway station was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1979.
NYC - Civic Center - Federal Plaza Jacob Javits Plaza, or Federal Plaza, is occupied by landscape architect Martha Schwartz's series of bright-green, painted benches curling around six large mounds covered with small bushes. The eye-catching design carries with it the erased history of the site, a long-demolished Richard Serra sculpture called Tilted Arc. The Jacob K. Javits Federal Office Building and Court of International Trade, later the Customs Court, sits on a city block bounded by Broadway Avenue on the west, Lafayette Street on the east, Worth Street on the north, and Duane Street on the south. The complex was completed in 1969 from a design by Alfred Easton Poor, Kahn & Jacobs, and Eggers & Higgins. A western addition to the Javits Building, covering its 41-story, west-facing blank wall, followed in 1977, with the same players involved. Occupying the northeast corner of the site across from Foley Square is Jacob Javits Plaza, or Federal Plaza, a product of the 1961 Zoning Amendment that provided bonuses for plazas created via setting buildings back from the sidewalk. Richard Serra's Titled Arc was installed in 1981--twelve feet high and 120 feet long, the 2-inch thick plane of Cor-ten (rusted) steel bisected the tapering plaza space in a east-west arc which leaned in slightly at the top of the arc’s concave curve. Serra's work was removed, after public hearings, in 1989. Shortly after its removal, the General Services Administration (SSA) filled the plaza with standard-issue planters and benches and reactivated the long-dormant fountain. The plaza was rededicated and used for a summer concert series celebrating the GSA’s 40th anniversary. Schwartz' "usable" redesign was announced in 1993 and completed in 1997. Removing all existing site elements, she covered the site with a curling maze of bright-green benches (about 1,700 linear feet of them) that snaked around six grass-covered mounds emitting steam in the warm months. Since then, the grass on the mounds has been replaced by hardier boxwood shrubs, and the mounds no longer emit steam.
NYC - Civic Center - Sounding Stones Maya Lin's Sounding Stones was installed outside the Federal Courthouse Plaza in 1996. Consisting of four sequentially placed granite blocks, each cut through to create viewing holes to see neighboring blocks or to see and hear water fountains contained within the blocks, they mark the pedestrians' path between the path between the Worth and Earl Street entrances to the Federal Building. ach stone averages six feet square, but varies in separation between blocks. The rough quarry-cut bore holes were left untouched, and the surfaces that were cut to form each block are the only polished surfaces.
NYC - Civic Center - New York County Courthouse - Justice When city officials decided in 1961 to widen the traffic lanes on Centre Street by narrowing the sidewalk, an elaborate entrance to the Hall of Records and Surrogate's Court building had to go. The stairs vanished, but not the two statues that flanked them: Philip Martiny's Justice and Authority turned up in the sculpture niches on the portico of the New York County Courthouse on Foley Square. Although the small scale of the statues had made sense at the Hall of Records, it seemed that the Lilliputians were camping out on the doorstep of the Brobdingnagians at the courthouse, a problem that was mercifully rectified in 1997. With the coming of the new United States Court House east of the county courthouse, a pleasant plaza has been created between Pearl and Worth Streets where Justice and Authority reside at an appropriate scale.
NYC - Civic Center - New York County Courthouse - Justice When city officials decided in 1961 to widen the traffic lanes on Centre Street by narrowing the sidewalk, an elaborate entrance to the Hall of Records and Surrogate's Court building had to go. The stairs vanished, but not the two statues that flanked them: Philip Martiny's Justice and Authority turned up in the sculpture niches on the portico of the New York County Courthouse on Foley Square. Although the small scale of the statues had made sense at the Hall of Records, it seemed that the Lilliputians were camping out on the doorstep of the Brobdingnagians at the courthouse, a problem that was mercifully rectified in 1997. With the coming of the new United States Court House east of the county courthouse, a pleasant plaza has been created between Pearl and Worth Streets where Justice and Authority reside at an appropriate scale.
NYC - Civic Center - New York County Courthouse - Authority When city officials decided in 1961 to widen the traffic lanes on Centre Street by narrowing the sidewalk, an elaborate entrance to the Hall of Records and Surrogate's Court building had to go. The stairs vanished, but not the two statues that flanked them: Philip Martiny's Justice and Authority turned up in the sculpture niches on the portico of the New York County Courthouse on Foley Square. Although the small scale of the statues had made sense at the Hall of Records, it seemed that the Lilliputians were camping out on the doorstep of the Brobdingnagians at the courthouse, a problem that was mercifully rectified in 1997. With the coming of the new United States Court House east of the county courthouse, a pleasant plaza has been created between Pearl and Worth Streets where Justice and Authority reside at an appropriate scale.
NYC - Civic Center - New York County Courthouse - Authority When city officials decided in 1961 to widen the traffic lanes on Centre Street by narrowing the sidewalk, an elaborate entrance to the Hall of Records and Surrogate's Court building had to go. The stairs vanished, but not the two statues that flanked them: Philip Martiny's Justice and Authority turned up in the sculpture niches on the portico of the New York County Courthouse on Foley Square. Although the small scale of the statues had made sense at the Hall of Records, it seemed that the Lilliputians were camping out on the doorstep of the Brobdingnagians at the courthouse, a problem that was mercifully rectified in 1997. With the coming of the new United States Court House east of the county courthouse, a pleasant plaza has been created between Pearl and Worth Streets where Justice and Authority reside at an appropriate scale.
NYC - Civic Center - Foley Square Hay-l-apy-ee-che-quay-hee-las, The Place Where the Sun is Born, Menesenek on the Island, Munsee, People of the Stony Country The land on which you presently stand orginally formed the edge of the largest body of fresh water on the island now called Manhattan. On rocky bluffs to the west of this large poind indigenous peoples feasted on oysters that were commonly as large as one foot. Expert navigators, the Lenape carved boats from timber logs by burning and seraping. These ocean-going vessels were used for traveling, fishing and whaling. For thousands of years, this land was inhabited by the Lenape people. They belonged to the tribes or clans symbolized by the wolf, the turtle or the turkey. These three animals also represented the three key elements on which the Lenape people relied for their survival--earth, water and sky--the three natural domains of all living creatures. A Southern branch of the Lenape of Delaware Indians, the Munsee tribe, fished, farmed and hunted on this island. William Penn described their appearance as "Tall, straight, well-built...they tread strong." The homeland of the Lenape, Lenapehoking, was a vast domain that stretched along the Atlantic Coast from what is now New York Bay to Delaware Bay, between the Hudson and Delaware River valleys.
NYC - Civic Center - Avenue of the Strongest Avenue of the Strongest was named in 1996 in honor of the men and women of the city's Department of Sanitation after a winter of 16 snowstorms during which they plowed 7 1/2 feet of snow from the city streets. The headquarters of the Department of Sanitation is on Worth Street. Centre Street, originally called Collect Street, was laid over Collect Pond, which was filled in early in the 19th century. The street name was changed in 1928 to identify it as terminating at Centre Market. Worth Street was named for Major General William Jenkins Worth (1749-1849), second in command to Zachary Taylor in the Mexican War. He died in conflict and is buried in Worth Square.
NYC - Civic Center - New York County Courthouse The Supreme Courthouse (New York County Court) overlooks Foley Square and is located between Worth and Pearl Streets. The building houses the Supreme Court and the Office of the County Clerk. In 1927 the New York County Court moved from the old Tweed Courthouse to this spacious granite-faced building. The Boston architect Guy Lowell won a competition in 1913 with a design for a round building. Construction was delayed and the design altered to a hexagonal form; work finally began in 1919. The Roman classical style chosen was popular for courthouse architecture in the first decades of the 20th century. The courthouse was the first major New York commission for the well-known Boston architect Guy Lowell (1870-1927). He designed the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the building plan for Philips Academy at Andover, Massachusetts. He was also a landscape architect and designed formal gardens for Andrew Carnegie and J. Pierpont Morgan in New York. The courthouse rises above a 100-foot wide flight of steps to an imposing colonnade of 10 granite fluted Corinthian columns. Above the columns are engraved words of George Washington: "The true administration of justice is the firmest pillar of good government." Above this is a triangular pediment, 140-feet long, with 14 classical figures in high relief. Along the huge roofline are three statues representing Law, Truth and Equity. All of the pediment sculpture was carved by Frederick Warren Allen. Foley Square is named for Thomas F. “Big Tom” Foley (1852-1925), a prominent Democratic Party leader from the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Foley left school at the age of thirteen to support his widowed mother, working for a period as a blacksmith’s helper. In 1877 he began his active connection with politics as a Tammany election district captain and rose to be First Assembly District leader.
NYC - Civic Center - New York County Courthouse The Supreme Courthouse (New York County Court) overlooks Foley Square and is located between Worth and Pearl Streets. The building houses the Supreme Court and the Office of the County Clerk. In 1927 the New York County Court moved from the old Tweed Courthouse to this spacious granite-faced building. The Boston architect Guy Lowell won a competition in 1913 with a design for a round building. Construction was delayed and the design altered to a hexagonal form; work finally began in 1919. The Roman classical style chosen was popular for courthouse architecture in the first decades of the 20th century. The courthouse was the first major New York commission for the well-known Boston architect Guy Lowell (1870-1927). He designed the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the building plan for Philips Academy at Andover, Massachusetts. He was also a landscape architect and designed formal gardens for Andrew Carnegie and J. Pierpont Morgan in New York. The courthouse rises above a 100-foot wide flight of steps to an imposing colonnade of 10 granite fluted Corinthian columns. Above the columns are engraved words of George Washington: "The true administration of justice is the firmest pillar of good government." Above this is a triangular pediment, 140-feet long, with 14 classical figures in high relief. Along the huge roofline are three statues representing Law, Truth and Equity. All of the pediment sculpture was carved by Frederick Warren Allen. Foley Square is named for Thomas F. “Big Tom” Foley (1852-1925), a prominent Democratic Party leader from the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Foley left school at the age of thirteen to support his widowed mother, working for a period as a blacksmith’s helper. In 1877 he began his active connection with politics as a Tammany election district captain and rose to be First Assembly District leader.
NYC - Civic Center: African Burial Ground Way During the preliminary construction phase of a new Federal office building at 290 Broadway in 1991, workers discovered the remains of more than 400 Africans stacked in wooden boxes just 16 to 28 feet below street level. Construction on what was to become a $276 million U.S. General Services Commission building was halted immediately, and a subsequent archeological investigation unearthed the remnants of a five- to six-acre African burial ground used throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Initially, the federal government resisted permanent discontinuation. owever, the overwhelming response from the African-American community, including then Mayor David Dinkins, in the form of protests, vigils, public meetings, and religious observances eventually won the support of the federal government. Enslaved Africans began arriving on the shores of the colony of New Amsterdam as early as 1626, and the area known today as New York City was one of the largest slave trading centers (second only to Charleston, South Carolina) throughout the colonial period. The Burial Ground, though, wasn't created until the early 1700s, when Trinity Church banned all Africans from its cemetery, leaving them relegated to a deserted area, then more than a mile outside the city limit, to bury their dead. As the city began to expand throughout the 18th century, it appropriated the space occupied by the African Burial Ground and covered the site with landfill and debris from the nearby leather and pottery industries. By the time slavery was abolished in New York -- on Emancipation Day, July 4, 1827 -- many had long forgotten about the burial ground. At the time of its discovery in 1991, the African Burial Ground was recognized as the largest and only known urban pre-Revolutionary African cemetery in the country. In 1993, the federal government declared the site a National Historic Landmark. Between the time of its discovery and its designation as a historic landmark, urban archeologists exhumed the remains of more than 400 African adults and children, along with various artifacts such as beads, coins, and shells, and transported them to Washington, D.C.'s Howard University. In September 2005, ground was broken for a $3 million memorial, located at Duane and Elk Streets, commemorating the lives of 20,000 enslaved Africans who were laid to rest in the Civic Center area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Though most remains were exhumed, more than 400 were ceremoniously reinterred in October 2003. National Historic Register #93001597
NYC - Civic Center: African Burial Ground National Monument During the preliminary construction phase of a new Federal office building at 290 Broadway in 1991, workers discovered the remains of more than 400 Africans stacked in wooden boxes just 16 to 28 feet below street level. Construction on what was to become a $276 million U.S. General Services Commission building was halted immediately, and a subsequent archeological investigation unearthed the remnants of a five- to six-acre African burial ground used throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Initially, the federal government resisted permanent discontinuation. owever, the overwhelming response from the African-American community, including then Mayor David Dinkins, in the form of protests, vigils, public meetings, and religious observances eventually won the support of the federal government. Enslaved Africans began arriving on the shores of the colony of New Amsterdam as early as 1626, and the area known today as New York City was one of the largest slave trading centers (second only to Charleston, South Carolina) throughout the colonial period. The Burial Ground, though, wasn't created until the early 1700s, when Trinity Church banned all Africans from its cemetery, leaving them relegated to a deserted area, then more than a mile outside the city limit, to bury their dead. As the city began to expand throughout the 18th century, it appropriated the space occupied by the African Burial Ground and covered the site with landfill and debris from the nearby leather and pottery industries. By the time slavery was abolished in New York -- on Emancipation Day, July 4, 1827 -- many had long forgotten about the burial ground. At the time of its discovery in 1991, the African Burial Ground was recognized as the largest and only known urban pre-Revolutionary African cemetery in the country. In 1993, the federal government declared the site a National Historic Landmark. Between the time of its discovery and its designation as a historic landmark, urban archeologists exhumed the remains of more than 400 African adults and children, along with various artifacts such as beads, coins, and shells, and transported them to Washington, D.C.'s Howard University. In September 2005, ground was broken for a $3 million memorial, located at Duane and Elk Streets, commemorating the lives of 20,000 enslaved Africans who were laid to rest in the Civic Center area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Though most remains were exhumed, more than 400 were ceremoniously reinterred in October 2003. Designed by architect Rodney Léon, the soaring, circular memorial is home to a wall of remembrance, ancestral pillars, a spiral processional ramp, and a "Circle of the Diaspora," which features symbols and images of African, Latin American, and Caribbean cultures. The U.S. General Services Administrationfunded the memorial, which was built and maintained in collaboration with the National Parks Service. NPS declared the site a National Monument in fall 2007. National Historic Register #93001597
NYC - Civic Center: African Burial Ground National Monument During the preliminary construction phase of a new Federal office building at 290 Broadway in 1991, workers discovered the remains of more than 400 Africans stacked in wooden boxes just 16 to 28 feet below street level. Construction on what was to become a $276 million U.S. General Services Commission building was halted immediately, and a subsequent archeological investigation unearthed the remnants of a five- to six-acre African burial ground used throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Initially, the federal government resisted permanent discontinuation. owever, the overwhelming response from the African-American community, including then Mayor David Dinkins, in the form of protests, vigils, public meetings, and religious observances eventually won the support of the federal government. Enslaved Africans began arriving on the shores of the colony of New Amsterdam as early as 1626, and the area known today as New York City was one of the largest slave trading centers (second only to Charleston, South Carolina) throughout the colonial period. The Burial Ground, though, wasn't created until the early 1700s, when Trinity Church banned all Africans from its cemetery, leaving them relegated to a deserted area, then more than a mile outside the city limit, to bury their dead. As the city began to expand throughout the 18th century, it appropriated the space occupied by the African Burial Ground and covered the site with landfill and debris from the nearby leather and pottery industries. By the time slavery was abolished in New York -- on Emancipation Day, July 4, 1827 -- many had long forgotten about the burial ground. At the time of its discovery in 1991, the African Burial Ground was recognized as the largest and only known urban pre-Revolutionary African cemetery in the country. In 1993, the federal government declared the site a National Historic Landmark. Between the time of its discovery and its designation as a historic landmark, urban archeologists exhumed the remains of more than 400 African adults and children, along with various artifacts such as beads, coins, and shells, and transported them to Washington, D.C.'s Howard University. In September 2005, ground was broken for a $3 million memorial, located at Duane and Elk Streets, commemorating the lives of 20,000 enslaved Africans who were laid to rest in the Civic Center area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Though most remains were exhumed, more than 400 were ceremoniously reinterred in October 2003. Designed by architect Rodney Léon, the soaring, circular memorial is home to a wall of remembrance, ancestral pillars, a spiral processional ramp, and a "Circle of the Diaspora," which features symbols and images of African, Latin American, and Caribbean cultures. The U.S. General Services Administrationfunded the memorial, which was built and maintained in collaboration with the National Parks Service. NPS declared the site a National Monument in fall 2007. National Historic Register #93001597
NYC - Civic Center: African Burial Ground National Monument During the preliminary construction phase of a new Federal office building at 290 Broadway in 1991, workers discovered the remains of more than 400 Africans stacked in wooden boxes just 16 to 28 feet below street level. Construction on what was to become a $276 million U.S. General Services Commission building was halted immediately, and a subsequent archeological investigation unearthed the remnants of a five- to six-acre African burial ground used throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Initially, the federal government resisted permanent discontinuation. owever, the overwhelming response from the African-American community, including then Mayor David Dinkins, in the form of protests, vigils, public meetings, and religious observances eventually won the support of the federal government. Enslaved Africans began arriving on the shores of the colony of New Amsterdam as early as 1626, and the area known today as New York City was one of the largest slave trading centers (second only to Charleston, South Carolina) throughout the colonial period. The Burial Ground, though, wasn't created until the early 1700s, when Trinity Church banned all Africans from its cemetery, leaving them relegated to a deserted area, then more than a mile outside the city limit, to bury their dead. As the city began to expand throughout the 18th century, it appropriated the space occupied by the African Burial Ground and covered the site with landfill and debris from the nearby leather and pottery industries. By the time slavery was abolished in New York -- on Emancipation Day, July 4, 1827 -- many had long forgotten about the burial ground. At the time of its discovery in 1991, the African Burial Ground was recognized as the largest and only known urban pre-Revolutionary African cemetery in the country. In 1993, the federal government declared the site a National Historic Landmark. Between the time of its discovery and its designation as a historic landmark, urban archeologists exhumed the remains of more than 400 African adults and children, along with various artifacts such as beads, coins, and shells, and transported them to Washington, D.C.'s Howard University. In September 2005, ground was broken for a $3 million memorial, located at Duane and Elk Streets, commemorating the lives of 20,000 enslaved Africans who were laid to rest in the Civic Center area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Though most remains were exhumed, more than 400 were ceremoniously reinterred in October 2003. Designed by architect Rodney Léon, the soaring, circular memorial is home to a wall of remembrance, ancestral pillars, a spiral processional ramp, and a "Circle of the Diaspora," which features symbols and images of African, Latin American, and Caribbean cultures. The U.S. General Services Administrationfunded the memorial, which was built and maintained in collaboration with the National Parks Service. NPS declared the site a National Monument in fall 2007. National Historic Register #93001597
NYC - Civic Center: African Burial Ground National Monument During the preliminary construction phase of a new Federal office building at 290 Broadway in 1991, workers discovered the remains of more than 400 Africans stacked in wooden boxes just 16 to 28 feet below street level. Construction on what was to become a $276 million U.S. General Services Commission building was halted immediately, and a subsequent archeological investigation unearthed the remnants of a five- to six-acre African burial ground used throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Initially, the federal government resisted permanent discontinuation. owever, the overwhelming response from the African-American community, including then Mayor David Dinkins, in the form of protests, vigils, public meetings, and religious observances eventually won the support of the federal government. Enslaved Africans began arriving on the shores of the colony of New Amsterdam as early as 1626, and the area known today as New York City was one of the largest slave trading centers (second only to Charleston, South Carolina) throughout the colonial period. The Burial Ground, though, wasn't created until the early 1700s, when Trinity Church banned all Africans from its cemetery, leaving them relegated to a deserted area, then more than a mile outside the city limit, to bury their dead. As the city began to expand throughout the 18th century, it appropriated the space occupied by the African Burial Ground and covered the site with landfill and debris from the nearby leather and pottery industries. By the time slavery was abolished in New York -- on Emancipation Day, July 4, 1827 -- many had long forgotten about the burial ground. At the time of its discovery in 1991, the African Burial Ground was recognized as the largest and only known urban pre-Revolutionary African cemetery in the country. In 1993, the federal government declared the site a National Historic Landmark. Between the time of its discovery and its designation as a historic landmark, urban archeologists exhumed the remains of more than 400 African adults and children, along with various artifacts such as beads, coins, and shells, and transported them to Washington, D.C.'s Howard University. In September 2005, ground was broken for a $3 million memorial, located at Duane and Elk Streets, commemorating the lives of 20,000 enslaved Africans who were laid to rest in the Civic Center area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Though most remains were exhumed, more than 400 were ceremoniously reinterred in October 2003. Designed by architect Rodney Léon, the soaring, circular memorial is home to a wall of remembrance, ancestral pillars, a spiral processional ramp, and a "Circle of the Diaspora," which features symbols and images of African, Latin American, and Caribbean cultures. The U.S. General Services Administrationfunded the memorial, which was built and maintained in collaboration with the National Parks Service. NPS declared the site a National Monument in fall 2007. National Historic Register #93001597
NYC - Civic Center: African Burial Ground National Monument During the preliminary construction phase of a new Federal office building at 290 Broadway in 1991, workers discovered the remains of more than 400 Africans stacked in wooden boxes just 16 to 28 feet below street level. Construction on what was to become a $276 million U.S. General Services Commission building was halted immediately, and a subsequent archeological investigation unearthed the remnants of a five- to six-acre African burial ground used throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Initially, the federal government resisted permanent discontinuation. owever, the overwhelming response from the African-American community, including then Mayor David Dinkins, in the form of protests, vigils, public meetings, and religious observances eventually won the support of the federal government. Enslaved Africans began arriving on the shores of the colony of New Amsterdam as early as 1626, and the area known today as New York City was one of the largest slave trading centers (second only to Charleston, South Carolina) throughout the colonial period. The Burial Ground, though, wasn't created until the early 1700s, when Trinity Church banned all Africans from its cemetery, leaving them relegated to a deserted area, then more than a mile outside the city limit, to bury their dead. As the city began to expand throughout the 18th century, it appropriated the space occupied by the African Burial Ground and covered the site with landfill and debris from the nearby leather and pottery industries. By the time slavery was abolished in New York -- on Emancipation Day, July 4, 1827 -- many had long forgotten about the burial ground. At the time of its discovery in 1991, the African Burial Ground was recognized as the largest and only known urban pre-Revolutionary African cemetery in the country. In 1993, the federal government declared the site a National Historic Landmark. Between the time of its discovery and its designation as a historic landmark, urban archeologists exhumed the remains of more than 400 African adults and children, along with various artifacts such as beads, coins, and shells, and transported them to Washington, D.C.'s Howard University. In September 2005, ground was broken for a $3 million memorial, located at Duane and Elk Streets, commemorating the lives of 20,000 enslaved Africans who were laid to rest in the Civic Center area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Though most remains were exhumed, more than 400 were ceremoniously reinterred in October 2003. Designed by architect Rodney Léon, the soaring, circular memorial is home to a wall of remembrance, ancestral pillars, a spiral processional ramp, and a "Circle of the Diaspora," which features symbols and images of African, Latin American, and Caribbean cultures. The U.S. General Services Administrationfunded the memorial, which was built and maintained in collaboration with the National Parks Service. NPS declared the site a National Monument in fall 2007. National Historic Register #93001597
NYC - Civic Center: African Burial Ground National Monument During the preliminary construction phase of a new Federal office building at 290 Broadway in 1991, workers discovered the remains of more than 400 Africans stacked in wooden boxes just 16 to 28 feet below street level. Construction on what was to become a $276 million U.S. General Services Commission building was halted immediately, and a subsequent archeological investigation unearthed the remnants of a five- to six-acre African burial ground used throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Initially, the federal government resisted permanent discontinuation. owever, the overwhelming response from the African-American community, including then Mayor David Dinkins, in the form of protests, vigils, public meetings, and religious observances eventually won the support of the federal government. Enslaved Africans began arriving on the shores of the colony of New Amsterdam as early as 1626, and the area known today as New York City was one of the largest slave trading centers (second only to Charleston, South Carolina) throughout the colonial period. The Burial Ground, though, wasn't created until the early 1700s, when Trinity Church banned all Africans from its cemetery, leaving them relegated to a deserted area, then more than a mile outside the city limit, to bury their dead. As the city began to expand throughout the 18th century, it appropriated the space occupied by the African Burial Ground and covered the site with landfill and debris from the nearby leather and pottery industries. By the time slavery was abolished in New York -- on Emancipation Day, July 4, 1827 -- many had long forgotten about the burial ground. At the time of its discovery in 1991, the African Burial Ground was recognized as the largest and only known urban pre-Revolutionary African cemetery in the country. In 1993, the federal government declared the site a National Historic Landmark. Between the time of its discovery and its designation as a historic landmark, urban archeologists exhumed the remains of more than 400 African adults and children, along with various artifacts such as beads, coins, and shells, and transported them to Washington, D.C.'s Howard University. In September 2005, ground was broken for a $3 million memorial, located at Duane and Elk Streets, commemorating the lives of 20,000 enslaved Africans who were laid to rest in the Civic Center area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Though most remains were exhumed, more than 400 were ceremoniously reinterred in October 2003. Designed by architect Rodney Léon, the soaring, circular memorial is home to a wall of remembrance, ancestral pillars, a spiral processional ramp, and a "Circle of the Diaspora," which features symbols and images of African, Latin American, and Caribbean cultures. The U.S. General Services Administrationfunded the memorial, which was built and maintained in collaboration with the National Parks Service. NPS declared the site a National Monument in fall 2007.
NYC - Civic Center: African Burial Ground National Monument During the preliminary construction phase of a new Federal office building at 290 Broadway in 1991, workers discovered the remains of more than 400 Africans stacked in wooden boxes just 16 to 28 feet below street level. Construction on what was to become a $276 million U.S. General Services Commission building was halted immediately, and a subsequent archeological investigation unearthed the remnants of a five- to six-acre African burial ground used throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Initially, the federal government resisted permanent discontinuation. owever, the overwhelming response from the African-American community, including then Mayor David Dinkins, in the form of protests, vigils, public meetings, and religious observances eventually won the support of the federal government. Enslaved Africans began arriving on the shores of the colony of New Amsterdam as early as 1626, and the area known today as New York City was one of the largest slave trading centers (second only to Charleston, South Carolina) throughout the colonial period. The Burial Ground, though, wasn't created until the early 1700s, when Trinity Church banned all Africans from its cemetery, leaving them relegated to a deserted area, then more than a mile outside the city limit, to bury their dead. As the city began to expand throughout the 18th century, it appropriated the space occupied by the African Burial Ground and covered the site with landfill and debris from the nearby leather and pottery industries. By the time slavery was abolished in New York -- on Emancipation Day, July 4, 1827 -- many had long forgotten about the burial ground. At the time of its discovery in 1991, the African Burial Ground was recognized as the largest and only known urban pre-Revolutionary African cemetery in the country. In 1993, the federal government declared the site a National Historic Landmark. Between the time of its discovery and its designation as a historic landmark, urban archeologists exhumed the remains of more than 400 African adults and children, along with various artifacts such as beads, coins, and shells, and transported them to Washington, D.C.'s Howard University. In September 2005, ground was broken for a $3 million memorial, located at Duane and Elk Streets, commemorating the lives of 20,000 enslaved Africans who were laid to rest in the Civic Center area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Though most remains were exhumed, more than 400 were ceremoniously reinterred in October 2003. Designed by architect Rodney Léon, the soaring, circular memorial is home to a wall of remembrance, ancestral pillars, a spiral processional ramp, and a "Circle of the Diaspora," which features symbols and images of African, Latin American, and Caribbean cultures. The U.S. General Services Administrationfunded the memorial, which was built and maintained in collaboration with the National Parks Service. NPS declared the site a National Monument in fall 2007. National Historic Register #93001597
NYC - Civic Center: African Burial Ground National Monument During the preliminary construction phase of a new Federal office building at 290 Broadway in 1991, workers discovered the remains of more than 400 Africans stacked in wooden boxes just 16 to 28 feet below street level. Construction on what was to become a $276 million U.S. General Services Commission building was halted immediately, and a subsequent archeological investigation unearthed the remnants of a five- to six-acre African burial ground used throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Initially, the federal government resisted permanent discontinuation. owever, the overwhelming response from the African-American community, including then Mayor David Dinkins, in the form of protests, vigils, public meetings, and religious observances eventually won the support of the federal government. Enslaved Africans began arriving on the shores of the colony of New Amsterdam as early as 1626, and the area known today as New York City was one of the largest slave trading centers (second only to Charleston, South Carolina) throughout the colonial period. The Burial Ground, though, wasn't created until the early 1700s, when Trinity Church banned all Africans from its cemetery, leaving them relegated to a deserted area, then more than a mile outside the city limit, to bury their dead. As the city began to expand throughout the 18th century, it appropriated the space occupied by the African Burial Ground and covered the site with landfill and debris from the nearby leather and pottery industries. By the time slavery was abolished in New York -- on Emancipation Day, July 4, 1827 -- many had long forgotten about the burial ground. At the time of its discovery in 1991, the African Burial Ground was recognized as the largest and only known urban pre-Revolutionary African cemetery in the country. In 1993, the federal government declared the site a National Historic Landmark. Between the time of its discovery and its designation as a historic landmark, urban archeologists exhumed the remains of more than 400 African adults and children, along with various artifacts such as beads, coins, and shells, and transported them to Washington, D.C.'s Howard University. In September 2005, ground was broken for a $3 million memorial, located at Duane and Elk Streets, commemorating the lives of 20,000 enslaved Africans who were laid to rest in the Civic Center area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Though most remains were exhumed, more than 400 were ceremoniously reinterred in October 2003. Designed by architect Rodney Léon, the soaring, circular memorial is home to a wall of remembrance, ancestral pillars, a spiral processional ramp, and a "Circle of the Diaspora," which features symbols and images of African, Latin American, and Caribbean cultures. The U.S. General Services Administrationfunded the memorial, which was built and maintained in collaboration with the National Parks Service. NPS declared the site a National Monument in fall 2007. National Historic Register #93001597
NYC - Civic Center: Municipal Building - Progress and Civic Pride The Municipal Building, at 1 Centre St., was designed by William M. Kendall of McKim, Mead & White, and built in 1909-1915 as the joint administration offices for the Greater New York, created after the annexation of Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island to Manhattan in 1898. After two inconclusive design competitions to replace the City Hall in 1888 and 1893, and a law was signed that prohibited its replacement in 1894, the site of the 1907 competition was shifted to a plot to the north-east, originally meant for an extension of the Brooklyn Building trolley terminal. The selection was made in 1908 and the next year work on this behemoth with 60,400 m² of office space -- a feature that helped the design to win the competition -- was begun. The first occupants moved to the building in January 1913, two years before work on it was completed. The building was influenced by the fashionable "City Beautiful" movement of the 1890s which promoted plans for creating public buildings in landscaped parks. The mid-part of the 25-storey tripartite facade is a U-shaped mass of austere light-toned granite over a high colonnade that forms the building's base and separates a front yard from the sidewalk. To the left of the entrance, is a bas-relief medallion, Progress, a youth holding a torch and a winged globe; and the bas-relief Civic Pride, showing the female personification of the City receiving tribute from her citizens. To the right,, is another bas-relief medallion, Prudence, a woman holding a mirror symbolizing reflection and wisdom; and the bas-relief Civic Duty, represented by a woman personifying the City, accompanied by a child holding the seal of the City and greeting a group of citizens, holding a scroll symbolic of the laws they are to obey. The top portion of the building features a colonnade of Corinthian columns and pilasters. The 16-storey top, above the middle section of the building, consists of a set-back tiered lantern on top of a square base, flanked by four smaller pinnacle turrets, symbolizing the four boroughs joined to Manhattan. At the height of 177 m stands the 6 m high statue Civic Fame by Adolph A. Weinman, New York City's second largest statue after the Statue of Liberty. This building impressed Josif Stalin so much that the Moscow University main building (1949-1953) was later based on it -- as well as, in general, the whole grandiose public building style in the Soviet Union. The building has an entrance to the Chambers Street subway station (1915), the first of many such connections to come. An archway leads through the mid-facade (a closed portion of Chambers St.) to the Police Headquarters across the landscaped Police Plaza. The Municipal Building was designed a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. National Register #72000879 (1972)
NYC - Civic Center: Municipal Building - Prudence and Civic Duty The Municipal Building, at 1 Centre St., was designed by William M. Kendall of McKim, Mead & White, and built in 1909-1915 as the joint administration offices for the Greater New York, created after the annexation of Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island to Manhattan in 1898. After two inconclusive design competitions to replace the City Hall in 1888 and 1893, and a law was signed that prohibited its replacement in 1894, the site of the 1907 competition was shifted to a plot to the north-east, originally meant for an extension of the Brooklyn Building trolley terminal. The selection was made in 1908 and the next year work on this behemoth with 60,400 m² of office space -- a feature that helped the design to win the competition -- was begun. The first occupants moved to the building in January 1913, two years before work on it was completed. The building was influenced by the fashionable "City Beautiful" movement of the 1890s which promoted plans for creating public buildings in landscaped parks. The mid-part of the 25-storey tripartite facade is a U-shaped mass of austere light-toned granite over a high colonnade that forms the building's base and separates a front yard from the sidewalk. To the left of the entrance, is a bas-relief medallion, Progress, a youth holding a torch and a winged globe; and the bas-relief Civic Pride, showing the female personification of the City receiving tribute from her citizens. To the right, is another bas-relief medallion, Prudence, a woman holding a mirror symbolizing reflection and wisdom; and the bas-relief Civic Duty, represented by a woman personifying the City, accompanied by a child holding the seal of the City and greeting a group of citizens, holding a scroll symbolic of the laws they are to obey. The top portion of the building features a colonnade of Corinthian columns and pilasters. The 16-storey top, above the middle section of the building, consists of a set-back tiered lantern on top of a square base, flanked by four smaller pinnacle turrets, symbolizing the four boroughs joined to Manhattan. At the height of 177 m stands the 6 m high statue Civic Fame by Adolph A. Weinman, New York City's second largest statue after the Statue of Liberty. This building impressed Josif Stalin so much that the Moscow University main building (1949-1953) was later based on it -- as well as, in general, the whole grandiose public building style in the Soviet Union. The building has an entrance to the Chambers Street subway station (1915), the first of many such connections to come. An archway leads through the mid-facade (a closed portion of Chambers St.) to the Police Headquarters across the landscaped Police Plaza. The Municipal Building was designed a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. National Register #72000879 (1972)
NYC - The Municipal Building The Municipal Building, at 1 Centre St., was designed by William M. Kendall of McKim, Mead & White, and built in 1909-1915 as the joint administration offices for the Greater New York, created after the annexation of Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island to Manhattan in 1898. After two inconclusive design competitions to replace the City Hall in 1888 and 1893, and a law was signed that prohibited its replacement in 1894, the site of the 1907 competition was shifted to a plot to the north-east, originally meant for an extension of the Brooklyn Building trolley terminal. The selection was made in 1908 and the next year work on this behemoth with 60,400 m² of office space -- a feature that helped the design to win the competition -- was begun. The first occupants moved to the building in January 1913, two years before work on it was completed. The building was influenced by the fashionable "City Beautiful" movement of the 1890s which promoted plans for creating public buildings in landscaped parks. The mid-part of the 25-storey tripartite facade is a U-shaped mass of austere light-toned granite over a high colonnade that forms the building's base and separates a front yard from the sidewalk. The top portion of the building features a colonnade of Corinthian columns and pilasters. The 16-storey top, above the middle section of the building, consists of a set-back tiered lantern on top of a square base, flanked by four smaller pinnacle turrets, symbolizing the four boroughs joined to Manhattan. At the height of 177 m stands the 6 m high statue Civic Fame by Adolph A. Weinman, New York City's second largest statue after the Statue of Liberty. This building impressed Josif Stalin so much that the Moscow University main building (1949-1953) was later based on it -- as well as, in general, the whole grandiose public building style in the Soviet Union. The building has an entrance to the Chambers Street subway station (1915), the first of many such connections to come. An archway leads through the mid-facade (a closed portion of Chambers St.) to the Police Headquarters across the landscaped Police Plaza. The Municipal Building was designed a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. National Register #72000879 (1972)
NYC - Pace University - Code of Life or Three Piece Cube The granite sculpture in front of the Pace Plaza building donated by alumnus Henry C. Beinstein '64 and designed by David Bakalar.
NYC - Pace University - Big Apple Fest - Brooklyn Bridge Hundreds of "Big Apple" sculptures, decorated by local and international artists, popped up all over New York in 2004 as part of the Big Apple Fest, a public art initiative to promote the city and benefit charities, announced NYC & Company President and CEO Cristyne L. Nicholas. The oversized apples are four feet tall and four feet in diameter. They are cast from acrylic, allowing artists to create three-dimensional works inside or decorate the exterior. Businesses and organizations paid $8,500 to sponsor an apple which or $12,500 to sponsor and keep the apple. This apple, entitled Brooklyn Bridge, standing in front of One Pace Plaza, is by the artist who goes by virtualip.com
NYC - Pace University - DOGNY - Setting the Pace Setting the Pace by artist Mike Neville, is on permanent display in front of One Pace Plaza. DOGNY – America’s Tribute to Search and Rescue Dogs is a public art initiative commissioned by the American Kennel Club to honor the search and rescue dogs involved in post-September 11th operations and to raise money to support future endeavors. After the attacks on the World Trade Center, The Pentagon and Shanksville, PA, teams of handlers and dogs rushed in to assist in locating survivors. The AKC wanted to acknowledge these dogs with a public show of appreciation and a national effort to support their future missions. For this reason, AKC President and CEO Dennis B. Sprung created DOGNY. On the first anniversary of September 11, AKC and its affiliates, companies in the pet products industry, and many other organizations worked together to display over 100 uniquely painted sculptures of a Search and Rescue Dog throughout the five boroughs of New York City. In Thanksgiving of 2002, the DOGNY sculptures were brought to Sotheby’s for a charity auction. One hundred percent of funds raised by AKC for DOGNY (including donations, sponsorships, and auction sales) have been allocated in the 501(c)(3) AKC CAR Canine Support and Relief Fund for volunteer and professional canine search and rescue organizations throughout the country. To date, AKC has raised over $3 million for this cause.
NYC - Pace University - 1 Pace Plaza
NYC - South Street Seaport - 265 Water Street 265 Water Street was originally designed in 1872 by architect Charles Miltain to be a hardtack biscuit bakery.
NYC - South Street Seaport- Jasper Ward House TThe historic Jasper Ward House at 45 Peck Slip, the current home of Dodo's. a organic health foodstore, was constructed in 1808 and rennovated by 3-D Laboratory Inc. from a deteroriated shell in 2004. This structure was the only one spared by Con Edison when they built the South Street Substation in the 1970s and then donated it to the South Street Seaport Museum. This handsome nearly 200 year old counting house was erected on land Jasper purchased speculatively when it was still under water two centuries ago.
NYC - South Street Seaport - Peck Slip - Trompe l'oeil Richard Haas' 1977 mural, Trompe l'oeil, on the blank side wall of a Consolidated Edison building on Peck Slip depicts a classical colonnade, complete with an illusionistic view through the brick wall to the Brooklyn Bridge. Peck Slip is named for Benjamin Peck, who had an active ship-fitting business here in the mid-1700s. The actual slip was created in 1755. In 1763, he built the Slip Market at this location, one of the many predecessors of the Fulton Market. Thomas Edison located his first electric generating station near her at 255 Pearl Street in 1882. In fact, it was the first commercial generating system for incandescent service in the country. He selected this area because the financial commmunity was nearby (the first light were turned on at 23 Wall Street), were the newspapers. ConEd still still maintains this electrical substation on the north side of Peck Slip.
NYC - South Street Seaport - Paris Cafe In 1873, on the ground floor of the hotel bearing his name, an engaging entrepreneur named Henry Meyer constructed an elegant bar with polished woods and sparkling mirrors. He named it Paris Cafe.
NYC - Fulton Fish Market
NYC - South Street Seaport Museum - Fighting Irishmen: A Celebration of the Celtic Warrior From ancient times to the present, the fighting spirit of the Irish has been unquestioned. And when the Irish immigrated to New York, landing at the South Street piers, they brought this tradition with them. Patrick Killian's 2006 oil on canvas mural, Fighting Irishmen: A Celebration of the Celtic Warrior, depicting 47 Irish prizefighters was commissioned for the Fighting Irishmen exhibit at the South Street Seaport Museum in 2006. The pugilists depicted include: Jack Britton, Harry Greb, John Kilbane, Tommy Loughran, Mike Gibbons, Tom Gibbons, Packy McFarland, Terry McGovern, Dan Donnelly, John K. Sullivan, John L. Sullivan vs. Jake Kilrain in the last bare knuckle Heavyweight Championship, Jake Kilrain, "Old Smoke" John Morrissey Jem Driscoll, Jimmy McLarnin, "Nonpariel" Jack Dempsey, Archer vs. Griffith, Mickey Walker, Mike McTigue, Jimmy Slattery, Jack Dempsey, "Harlem" Tommy Murphy, Gene Tunney, Bob Fitzsimmons, Braddocks vs. Louis, "Sailor" Tom Sharkey, Paul Pender, Billy Conn, Graham vs. Gavilan, James Corbert, Jimmy Barry, Benny Lynch Rinty Monaghan, Denny Moyer, Nash vs. Buchanan, Gatti vs. Ward, McCullough and Carruth, Wayne McCullough, McGuigan vs. Pedroza, Collins vs. Eubank, Quarry vs. Ali, John Duddy, Kevin McBride, Cooney vs. Norton, Dave McAuley, Sean O'Grady, Jack McAuliffe
NYC - South Street Seaport Museum - Ship's Figurehead Ship's Figurehead, circa 1860 Figureheads are carved wooden sculptures mounted on the bows of shps. Depicted in the typical mid 19th century Victorian dress, this figuredhead holds a rose, probably related to the name of the ship for which its made. The vessel is unknown, however. The custom of decorating ships' bows probably began with the Ancient Egyptians. Greeks and Romans preferred figures of swift horses, ferocious boars and warrios. With the advent of the clipper ship in the 19th century, the figurehead evolved into a single figure, often a woman. Though tradition dictated it was unlucky to have a woman aboard a shp, it was believed that a female figurehead coulc calm stormy seas. This figurehead was discovered in the late 1970s in a warehouse formerly owned by the Consolidated Ship Building Co. at 132nd Street and St. Anne's Ave, Bronx, New York. It closely resembles a figurehead in the collection of Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut.
NYC - South Street Seaport Museum - Andrea Doria 50th Anniversary Medallion Andrea Doria 50th Anniversary Medallion Daniel Oberti, 2006, 18-unch diameter, bronze SSSM 2006 32.1 On the night of July 25, 1956, the New York-bound Italian ocean liner Andrea Doria was struck by the Europe-bound Swedish liner Stockholm off Nantucket Island. The Doria remained afloat for 12 hours before sinking, while the Stockholm was able to return to New York carrying many of the survivors of the Italian ship. This bronze medallion commemorating the tragedy was presented to South Street Seaport Museum on the 50th anniversary of the sinking. It reads "Corragio, Onore, Giustizia, Valore" (Courage, Honor, Justice, Valor) and includes the dates the Andrea Doria served as the flagship of the Italian Line, 1951-1956. Der Scutt, Chairman of the Museum's Ocean Liner Council, accepted the medallion at a ceremony held at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY on July 23, 2006. This is one of two identical medallions; the second is in the collection of the Galata Museo del Mare in Genoa, Italy. The medallions were sponsored by Jerome Reinert, Angela E. Addario and Pierette Simpson.

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