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NYC - NoLIta: Puck Building The Puck Building, at 295-307 Lafayette Street, was originally built to house the offices and printing plant of Puck, America's first successful humor magazine, and J. Ottman Lithographing Co., which printed the magazine's famous chromolithographc cartoons. The Romanesque Revival or Rundbogenstil (German round-arched neo-Romanesque) style building features two gilded figures of Shakespeare's character Puck in its façade--the one at the original entrance on Houston and Mulberry by Casper Buberl, and the one on Lafayette Street by Henry Baerer. The two original wings, designed by Albert Wagner in 1885-86 and 1892-93, fronted only on Houston and Mulberry Streets. In the late 1890's, Lafayette Street was extended through the block, and two bays of the Puck Building's Houston Street facade and the building's entire west wall were demolished. Herman Wagner designed the new Lafayette Street elevation to conform to the original design. Puck Magazine ceased publication in 1918 and the building now contains office space as well as ballrooms for large events on both the ground floor and the top floor. In the 1980s it was the home of Spy Magazine, whose editors informally dubbed it "The Spy Building". In the early 2000s, the building housed the Manhattan Center of Pratt Institute. Since 2004, the Puck Building has been home to New York University's Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. The Puck Building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1983. National Register #83001740 (1983)
NYC - NoLIta: Puck Building The Puck Building, at 295-307 Lafayette Street, was originally built to house the offices and printing plant of Puck, America's first successful humor magazine, and J. Ottman Lithographing Co., which printed the magazine's famous chromolithographc cartoons. The Romanesque Revival or Rundbogenstil (German round-arched neo-Romanesque) style building features two gilded figures of Shakespeare's character Puck in its façade--the one at the original entrance on Houston and Mulberry by Casper Buberl, and the one on Lafayette Street by Henry Baerer. Both fourt feet statues are made of gilded metal and date to 1885. The two original wings, designed by Albert Wagner in 1885-86 and 1892-93, fronted only on Houston and Mulberry Streets. In the late 1890's, Lafayette Street was extended through the block, and two bays of the Puck Building's Houston Street facade and the building's entire west wall were demolished. Herman Wagner designed the new Lafayette Street elevation to conform to the original design. Puck Magazine ceased publication in 1918 and the building now contains office space as well as ballrooms for large events on both the ground floor and the top floor. In the 1980s it was the home of Spy Magazine, whose editors informally dubbed it "The Spy Building". In the early 2000s, the building housed the Manhattan Center of Pratt Institute. Since 2004, the Puck Building has been home to New York University's Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. The Puck Building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1983. National Register #83001740 (1983)
NYC - NoLIta: Puck Building The Puck Building, at 295-307 Lafayette Street, was originally built to house the offices and printing plant of Puck, America's first successful humor magazine, and J. Ottman Lithographing Co., which printed the magazine's famous chromolithographc cartoons. The Romanesque Revival or Rundbogenstil (German round-arched neo-Romanesque) style building features two gilded figures of Shakespeare's character Puck in its façade--the one at the original entrance on Houston and Mulberry by Casper Buberl, and the one on Lafayette Street by Henry Baerer. The two original wings, designed by Albert Wagner in 1885-86 and 1892-93, fronted only on Houston and Mulberry Streets. In the late 1890's, Lafayette Street was extended through the block, and two bays of the Puck Building's Houston Street facade and the building's entire west wall were demolished. Herman Wagner designed the new Lafayette Street elevation to conform to the original design. Puck Magazine ceased publication in 1918 and the building now contains office space as well as ballrooms for large events on both the ground floor and the top floor. In the 1980s it was the home of Spy Magazine, whose editors informally dubbed it "The Spy Building". In the early 2000s, the building housed the Manhattan Center of Pratt Institute. Since 2004, the Puck Building has been home to New York University's Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. The Puck Building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1983. National Register #83001740 (1983)
NYC - SoHo: Trump SoHo Hotel Condominium (in construction) Donald Trump's Trump SoHo Hotel Condominium, a 458-foot tall, 46-floor high-rise building designed by David Rockwell of the Rockwell Group and Handel Architects, is slated to open in 2009 when it will become SoHo's tallest building.
NYC - SoHo - Ear Inn The Ear Inn, a small landmark Irish pub/restaurant at 326 Spring Street, has been serving up drinks since 1867 in an 1817 house built for James Brown. James Brown, an African American who aided George Washington during the American Revolution is reputed to be depicted in Emmanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware. After the war, Brown settled in New York and worked in the lucrative tobacco trade between the South and Europe. He was successful enough to move to the suburbs near the village of Greenwich, and build this fashionable Federal townhouse, which was at the time, only five feet from the original shoreline of the Hudson River. The land was part of Jan’s Calk Hook Farm near the mouth of Minetta Creek flowing from Washington Square. Down Spring Street at today’s Avenue of the Americas stood the elegant Richmond Hill Estate, once home of George Washington as President, and later the residence of John Adams and Aaron Burr. The James Brown House is one of very few Federal houses left in the City. It is in largely original condition of 2 1/2 stories with dormers, double splayed keystone lintels, and a gambrel roof. The construction is all wood post and ‘beams set with pegs, with a facade of Flemish bond brick. The restaurant doors and window are late 19th century. The panel to the right of the main door is a night shudder cover to the original shop window, an 18th century style feature unique to this building. Once there were cellar windows and fireplaces in the bar area. At some time mid 19th century, this building became a spiritual establishment. Thomas Cooke brewed beer and sold crocks of corn, whiskey to thirsty sailors. The bottles above the bar and jugs above the phone booth were all dug out of the basement below the dining room. This area was once a backyard for a garden and an outhouse. A back alley extended to Washington Street near the canal and flower market on Canal Street. The dining room was constructed when the brewery became a restaurant at the turn of the century. Later it was a speakeasy during Prohibition. The upstairs apartment was variously a boarding house, smuggler’s den, and brothel. Ghosts have been heard and seen, in particular one “Mickey,” a sailor still waiting for his clipper ship to come in. Since the liberation from Prohibition, the bar had no name. To the sailors and longshoremen, it was like a clubhouse and was known as “The Green Door.” Its motto from long ago was “Known from Coast to Coast.” There used to be a pool table, gambling, tall tales, and no music except the sea songs of the bar room buddies. No women were allowed. Then in 1977, new resident-owners christened the place the Ear Inn. The new name was chosen to avoid the Landmark Commission’s lengthy review of any new sign. The neon BAR sign was painted to read EAR, after the musical Ear Magazine published upstairs. Ol’ timers never noticed and still call the place the Green Door. National Register of Historic Places #83001717 (1983)
NYC - SoHo - Ear Inn The Ear Inn, a small landmark Irish pub/restaurant at 326 Spring Street, has been serving up drinks since 1867 in an 1817 house built for James Brown. James Brown, an African American who aided George Washington during the American Revolution is reputed to be depicted in Emmanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware. After the war, Brown settled in New York and worked in the lucrative tobacco trade between the South and Europe. He was successful enough to move to the suburbs near the village of Greenwich, and build this fashionable Federal townhouse, which was at the time, only five feet from the original shoreline of the Hudson River. The land was part of Jan’s Calk Hook Farm near the mouth of Minetta Creek flowing from Washington Square. Down Spring Street at today’s Avenue of the Americas stood the elegant Richmond Hill Estate, once home of George Washington as President, and later the residence of John Adams and Aaron Burr. The James Brown House is one of very few Federal houses left in the City. It is in largely original condition of 2 1/2 stories with dormers, double splayed keystone lintels, and a gambrel roof. The construction is all wood post and ‘beams set with pegs, with a facade of Flemish bond brick. The restaurant doors and window are late 19th century. The panel to the right of the main door is a night shudder cover to the original shop window, an 18th century style feature unique to this building. Once there were cellar windows and fireplaces in the bar area. At some time mid 19th century, this building became a spiritual establishment. Thomas Cooke brewed beer and sold crocks of corn, whiskey to thirsty sailors. The bottles above the bar and jugs above the phone booth were all dug out of the basement below the dining room. This area was once a backyard for a garden and an outhouse. A back alley extended to Washington Street near the canal and flower market on Canal Street. The dining room was constructed when the brewery became a restaurant at the turn of the century. Later it was a speakeasy during Prohibition. The upstairs apartment was variously a boarding house, smuggler’s den, and brothel. Ghosts have been heard and seen, in particular one “Mickey,” a sailor still waiting for his clipper ship to come in. Since the liberation from Prohibition, the bar had no name. To the sailors and longshoremen, it was like a clubhouse and was known as “The Green Door.” Its motto from long ago was “Known from Coast to Coast.” There used to be a pool table, gambling, tall tales, and no music except the sea songs of the bar room buddies. No women were allowed. Then in 1977, new resident-owners christened the place the Ear Inn. The new name was chosen to avoid the Landmark Commission’s lengthy review of any new sign. The neon’ BAR sign was painted to read EAR, after the musical Ear Magazine published upstairs. Ol’ timers never noticed and still call the place the Green Door. National Register of Historic Places #83001717 (1983)
NYC - TriBeCa: Cary Building Erected in 1857 by William H. Cary, in the midst of a westward construction boom, for the dry-goods firm of Cary, Howard and Sanger, which dated to the 1830's. Designed by King & Kellum, and cast by Daniel Badger's Architectural Iron Works, the Cary Building has twin five-story cast-iron facades facing Chambers and Reade Street (the later of which is pictured here). Cary died in 1861, and although Cary, Howard & Sanger dissolved, the family held onto 105 Chambers through the 1950's. During the 1920's, Chambers Street was widened, giving the Cary Building not only its current corner position, but also a decidedly unimpressive contrasting eastern facade. At the turn of the 21st century, Chambers Street L.L.C., undertook an extensive restoration. Martin J. Marcus designed commercial spaces for the first four floors. Li/Saltzman Architects designed residential spaces for the top floor. The exterior, which had fallen to extensive rust stains, was restored to its original paint color, after a microscopic paint analysis performed by Historic Preservation and Illumination. The Cary Building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1982.
NYC - TriBeCa: Cary Building Erected in 1857 by William H. Cary, in the midst of a westward construction boom, for the dry-goods firm of Cary, Howard and Sanger, which dated to the 1830's. Designed by King & Kellum, and cast by Daniel Badger's Architectural Iron Works, the Cary Building has twin five-story cast-iron facades facing Chambers and Reade Street (the later of which is pictured here). Cary died in 1861, and although Cary, Howard & Sanger dissolved, the family held onto 105 Chambers through the 1950's. During the 1920's, Chambers Street was widened, giving the Cary Building not only its current corner position, but also a decidedly unimpressive contrasting eastern facade. At the turn of the 21st century, Chambers Street L.L.C., undertook an extensive restoration. Martin J. Marcus designed commercial spaces for the first four floors. Li/Saltzman Architects designed residential spaces for the top floor. The exterior, which had fallen to extensive rust stains, was restored to its original paint color, after a microscopic paint analysis performed by Historic Preservation and Illumination. The Cary Building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1982.
NYC - TriBeCa - 93-95 Reade Street
NYC - TriBeCa: Cary Building Erected in 1857 by William H. Cary, in the midst of a westward construction boom, for the dry-goods firm of Cary, Howard and Sanger, which dated to the 1830's. Designed by King & Kellum, and cast by Daniel Badger's Architectural Iron Works, the Cary Building has twin five-story cast-iron facades facing Chambers and Reade Street (the later of which is pictured here). Cary died in 1861, and although Cary, Howard & Sanger dissolved, the family held onto 105 Chambers through the 1950's. During the 1920's, Chambers Street was widened, giving the Cary Building not only its current corner position, but also a decidedly unimpressive contrasting eastern facade. At the turn of the 21st century, Chambers Street L.L.C., undertook an extensive restoration. Martin J. Marcus desighned commercial spaces for the first four floors. Li/Saltzman Architects designed residential spaces for the top floor. The exterior, which had fallen to extensive rust stains, was restored to its original paint color, after a microscopic paint analysis performed by Historic Preservation and Illumination. The Cary Building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1982
NYC - TriBeCa: State Insurance Fund
NYC - TriBeCa: AT&T Long Lines Building The AT&T Long Lines Building, at 33 Thomas Street, was built in 1974 to the design of John Carl Warnecke & Associates. The 551-foot, 29-story tall almost "windowless" tower--an extreme example of the Brutalist architectural style--was designed to provide security and protection of the expensive equipment houses inside. Another bi-product of the technical nature of its occupant, each floor is built 18 feet high, nearly double the normal office building. The exterior walls are pink-colored Swedish granite-faced precast concrete panels, and the building has six large protrusions which rise to the top.
NYC - TriBeCa: Ladder Company 1 This 3-story fire house's facade was designed to mimic municipal buildings. Engine 7 and Ladder 1 have called it home for over a century. Established in 1772, Ladder 1 was the city’s first ladder company. In 1832, the company was the first to convert from a manpower hand drawn apparatus to a horse drawn apparatus. In 1964, they received the city’s only Mack tower ladder. For the next two years, they were special called to every major fire until another one was purchased in 1966.
NYC - TriBeCa: 8 Thomas Street The David S. Brown Store, also known as the 8 Thomas Street Building, was built to the design of Jarvis Morgan Slade in 1875-76. The David S. Brown Company was established in 1808 as a tallow chandlery and by the 1870's was one of the most successfuly producers of laundry and toilet soaps. It has since been converted to a residential development with four interior lofts. The narrow, red-brick-faced five-story building, just three bays wide, is a rare remaining example of New York Ruskinian High Victorian Gothic masonry design. The use of banded stone arches and other Venetian Gothic motifs are heavily indebted to the influence of English theorist John Ruskin, while the cast iron of the ground floor indicates Slad interest in French architectural theory. The David S. Brown Store, also known as the 8 Thomas Street Building, was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978. National Register #80002705 (1980)
NYC - TriBeCa: Vincent D. McDonnell Building
NYC - LES - Blue Condominium
NYC - LES - New York Public Library Seward Park Branch The Seward Park Branch of The New York Public Library is one of 65 branches erected with funds given to New York City by Andrew Carnegie. A four-story red brick Renaissance Revival building with high ceilings and arched windows, the branch is located at the eastern edge of the park for which it is named. The branch's origins can be traced to 1886, when the Aguilar Free Library Society opened several libraries, including what would become the Seward Park Branch. The library, designed by the firm of Babb, Cook & Welch, opened its doors on November 11, 1909. The building houses adult, young adult, and reference collections on the first floor; a children's room on the second floor; and a literacy center on the third floor. In its first renovation since 1953, the branch reopened in 2004 with a restored exterior and interior, central air-conditioning, new technology infrastructure and computers, and ramps and an elevator that comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, among myriad improvements. In its early days, the Seward Park Branch served an immigrant Jewish population. Today, the community is home to a mixture of Jews, Hispanics, African Americans, and an ever-increasing Asian population.
NYC - LES - il laboratorio del gelato Il Laboratorio del Gelato was opened by Jon Snyder, the creator of the Ciao Bella brand, which he subsequentally sold in 1989, at 95 Orchard Street in 2002. Since then, the 50 rotating flavors of gelato and sorbet have worked their way onto desert menus and into gourmet-store freezers around town.
NYC - LES - Former Jewish Daily Forward Building The Jewish Daily Forward Building at 175 East Broadway was built in 1912. The Forward relocated to midtown in 1974, where it remains, and was succeeded by a Chinese church. The building was into a 39-unit apartment complex in 1999. Taking the name of a successful Socialist paper in Berlin, the Yiddish-language Daily Forward was first published in 1897 serving the swelling working-class immigrant population in the area. Abraham Cahan, the first editor, fled Russia after revolutionary activities. It was under his direction that the 8-page paper became more than just a broadside of political ideology, choosing to address “daily life” and local news. By the opening of the building, in the same year Socialist Eugene Debbs garnered 901,000 votes in the Presidential election, circulation had reached 120,000. The 1920’s saw circulation peak at 275,000, generating assets over $1MM, allowing the Forward to donate tens of thousands of dollars a year to labor and charity organizations. Laws in 1924 and 1929 restricted immigration eventually weakened the paper’s reach and by 1939 circulation had dropped to 170,000. Despite this, the Forward enjoyed a reputation as a literary paper attracting contributors like Isaac Bashevis Singer, Elie Wiesel and Art Spiegelman. In 1963, an English supplement was launched and today it prospers as a weekly with a circulation of 45,000 in English, Yiddish and Russian. A popular story was that the building was built in reaction to the Capitalist symbolism of the nearby Jarmulowksy Bank Building, but the construction started one year earlier. Designed by George Boehm, the 11-story midblock building still towers over the shorter houses and tenements in the area. Boehm would reuse the cream-and-tan exterior and delicate terra cotta design a few laters for his Chalif Dancing School (163 West 57th St). Above the second floor, a series of relief busts depict four famous socialists, including Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. Above them two oversize reclining figures in classical dress against a blue background flank a torch, an image that runs through the building's decoration. The Forward Building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1986.
NYC - LES - Seward Park - Seal Spray Fountain Opened on October 17, 1903, after the City of New York assumed operations of nine privately sponsored playgrounds operated by the Outdoor Recreation League (ORL), Seward Park became the first permanent, municipally built playground in the United States. According to newspaper reports, when its gates opened, an estimated 20,000 children rushed in. With its cinder surfacing, fences, recreation pavilion, and play and gymnastic equipment, the facility became a model for playground programming and design. The city had acquired this land by condemnation in 1897 but due to lack of funds, it remained largely unimproved until the intervention of the ORL. In addition to the playground, the 1903 plan featured a large running track with an open play area in the center and a children’s farm garden. Curving paths and a north-south mall divided the park into recreational areas. The limestone and terra cotta Seward Park Pavilion was equipped with marble baths, a gymnasium, and meeting rooms. Rocking chairs were placed on the broad porch for the use of mothers tending their small children. Seward Park underwent a major transformation in the 1930s and 1940s. A sliver of land on the east side was surrendered to the city. The Schiff Fountain (1895), designed by architect Arnold W. Brunner, was moved from nearby Rutgers Park to Seward Park in 1936. It was the gift of Jacob H. Schiff, a banker and philanthropist, to the people of the Lower East Side. Seward Park’s pavilion was demolished and a new recreation building was erected in 1941. The 1999 renovation of Seward Park has revived several features from the 1903 plan. There is a new center oval with a large spray shower and marble mosaic map of the neighborhood. The various quotations by historic local residents were provided by the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. Other revivals of the park’s original appearance include fencing modeled after the historic fences, as well as period lighting and site furniture. The new design also considers the legacy of park namesake William Henry Seward (1801-1872), an American statesman. As senator from New York (1849-1861), Seward was an outspoken critic of slavery. As Secretary of State under Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson, he arranged the 1867 purchase of Alaska from Russia. This famous bargain, once denounced as “Seward’s folly,” inspired playground equipment such as the seal spray shower and Mount McKinley play unit. Standing proudly in park’s tot lot is Chris “Snowcat” Crowley’s bronze statue of the husky named Togo. A contemporary of Balto (whose statue stands in Central Park), Togo played a heroic role in the 1925 dash to bring an antidiptheria serum to Nome, Alaska.
NYC - LES - Seward Park - Compass Opened on October 17, 1903, after the City of New York assumed operations of nine privately sponsored playgrounds operated by the Outdoor Recreation League (ORL), Seward Park became the first permanent, municipally built playground in the United States. According to newspaper reports, when its gates opened, an estimated 20,000 children rushed in. With its cinder surfacing, fences, recreation pavilion, and play and gymnastic equipment, the facility became a model for playground programming and design. The city had acquired this land by condemnation in 1897 but due to lack of funds, it remained largely unimproved until the intervention of the ORL. In addition to the playground, the 1903 plan featured a large running track with an open play area in the center and a children’s farm garden. Curving paths and a north-south mall divided the park into recreational areas. The limestone and terra cotta Seward Park Pavilion was equipped with marble baths, a gymnasium, and meeting rooms. Rocking chairs were placed on the broad porch for the use of mothers tending their small children. Seward Park underwent a major transformation in the 1930s and 1940s. A sliver of land on the east side was surrendered to the city. The Schiff Fountain (1895), designed by architect Arnold W. Brunner, was moved from nearby Rutgers Park to Seward Park in 1936. It was the gift of Jacob H. Schiff, a banker and philanthropist, to the people of the Lower East Side. Seward Park’s pavilion was demolished and a new recreation building was erected in 1941. The 1999 renovation of Seward Park has revived several features from the 1903 plan. There is a new center oval with a large spray shower and marble mosaic map of the neighborhood. The various quotations by historic local residents were provided by the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. Other revivals of the park’s original appearance include fencing modeled after the historic fences, as well as period lighting and site furniture. The new design also considers the legacy of park namesake William Henry Seward (1801-1872), an American statesman. As senator from New York (1849-1861), Seward was an outspoken critic of slavery. As Secretary of State under Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson, he arranged the 1867 purchase of Alaska from Russia. This famous bargain, once denounced as “Seward’s folly,” inspired playground equipment such as the seal spray shower and Mount McKinley play unit. Standing proudly in park’s tot lot is Chris “Snowcat” Crowley’s bronze statue of the husky named Togo. A contemporary of Balto (whose statue stands in Central Park), Togo played a heroic role in the 1925 dash to bring an antidiptheria serum to Nome, Alaska.
NYC - LES - Former Jewish Daily Forward Building The Jewish Daily Forward Building at 175 East Broadway was built in 1912. The Forward relocated to midtown in 1974, where it remains, and was succeeded by a Chinese church. The building was into a 39-unit apartment complex in 1999. Taking the name of a successful Socialist paper in Berlin, the Yiddish-language Daily Forward was first published in 1897 serving the swelling working-class immigrant population in the area. Abraham Cahan, the first editor, fled Russia after revolutionary activities. It was under his direction that the 8-page paper became more than just a broadside of political ideology, choosing to address “daily life” and local news. By the opening of the building, in the same year Socialist Eugene Debbs garnered 901,000 votes in the Presidential election, circulation had reached 120,000. The 1920’s saw circulation peak at 275,000, generating assets over $1MM, allowing the Forward to donate tens of thousands of dollars a year to labor and charity organizations. Laws in 1924 and 1929 restricted immigration eventually weakened the paper’s reach and by 1939 circulation had dropped to 170,000. Despite this, the Forward enjoyed a reputation as a literary paper attracting contributors like Isaac Bashevis Singer, Elie Wiesel and Art Spiegelman. In 1963, an English supplement was launched and today it prospers as a weekly with a circulation of 45,000 in English, Yiddish and Russian. A popular story was that the building was built in reaction to the Capitalist symbolism of the nearby Jarmulowksy Bank Building, but the construction started one year earlier. Designed by George Boehm, the 11-story midblock building still towers over the shorter houses and tenements in the area. Boehm would reuse the cream-and-tan exterior and delicate terra cotta design a few laters for his Chalif Dancing School (163 West 57th St). Above the second floor, a series of relief busts depict four famous socialists, including Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. Above them two oversize reclining figures in classical dress against a blue background flank a torch, an image that runs through the building's decoration. The Forward Building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1986.
NYC - LES - teany teany, at 90 rivington street, is the small tea house, vegeterian restaurant and beverage distributor owned by Kelly Tisdale, who opened the shop with former boyfriend Moby in 2002.
NYC - LES - Essex Street Market The Essex Street Market began in 1940 as part of an effort by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia to find a new place for street merchants to do business. At the time, pushcarts and vendors crowded the streets, making it difficult for police and fire vehicles to pass. To ease congetion, LaGuardia created this and several other indoor markets. In the early years, Essex Street Market's identity was shaped by the Lower East Side's Jewish and Italian immigrants. Beyond its function as a shopping destination, the Market also developed into a social environment. When a new Puerto Rican population shifted the neighborhood demographics in the 1950s, the Market grew quickyl. In the 1970s, the Market began to fall out of favor as many customers turned to more convenient supermarkets. After years of being run cooperatively by merchants, a 20-year lease expired in 1986. In 1992, a private developer took over andafter failing to achieve its development vision, handed over control to the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC). In 1995, the NYCEDC commenced a $1.5 million renovation and consolidation.
NYC - LES - Essex Market - Jeffrey's Meats Jeffrey's Meats, the oldest original family butcher on the Lower East Side has proudly served the community for over 75 years. Four generations after Allen Rhuhalter started his business, his great-grandson carries on the family tradition of providing customers with quality meet, good value and customized service. Originally located at 188 Orchard Street in 1929, Jeffrey's Meats has been operating in the Essex Street Market, currently at booth 36, since the Market opened for business in 1940. The Essex Street Market began in 1940 as part of an effort by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia to find a new place for street merchants to do business. At the time, pushcarts and vendors crowded the streets, making it difficult for police and fire vehicles to pass. To ease congetion, LaGuardia created this and several other indoor markets. In the early years, Essex Street Market's identity was shaped by the Lower East Side's Jewish and Italian immigrants. Beyond its function as a shopping destination, the Market also developed into a social environment. When a new Puerto Rican population shifted the neighborhood demographics in the 1950s, the Market grew quickyl. In the 1970s, the Market began to fall out of favor as many customers turned to more convenient supermarkets. After years of being run cooperatively by merchants, a 20-year lease expired in 1986. In 1992, a private developer took over andafter failing to achieve its development vision, handed over control to the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC). In 1995, the NYCEDC commenced a $1.5 million renovation and consolidation.
NYC - LES - Blue Condominium
NYC - LES - Economy Candy Economy Candy was just a typical corner canndy store when opened in 1937. Today, owned by second generation Jerry Cohen and his family, the "Nosher's Paradise of the Lower East Side" offers floor-to-ceiling shelves of candy--from high end stuff to tough to find European brands to old fashioned favorites.
NYC - LES - Economy Candy Economy Candy was just a typical corner canndy store when opened in 1937. Today, owned by second generation Jerry Cohen and his family, the "Nosher's Paradise of the Lower East Side" offers floor-to-ceiling shelves of candy--from high end stuff to tough to find European brands to old fashioned favorites.
NYC - LES - Economy Candy Economy Candy was just a typical corner canndy store when opened in 1937. Today, owned by second generation Jerry Cohen and his family, the "Nosher's Paradise of the Lower East Side" offers floor-to-ceiling shelves of candy--from high end stuff to tough to find European brands to old fashioned favorites.
NYC - LES - Economy Candy Economy Candy was just a typical corner canndy store when opened in 1937. Today, owned by second generation Jerry Cohen and his family, the "Nosher's Paradise of the Lower East Side" offers floor-to-ceiling shelves of candy--from high end stuff to tough to find European brands to old fashioned favorites.
NYC - LES - City of New York Stanton Substation
NYC - LES - Russ & Daughters Russ & Daughters, located at 179 East Houston Street, is a fourth-generation appetizing store. Joel Russ, an immigrant from Eastern Europe, arrived on New York's lower east side at the turn of the century and starting out selling herrings from a pushcart. In 1914, he opened a storefront on Orchard Street before moving into the present former tenement building around the corner in 1920. He called it "Russ' Cut-Rate Appetizers. Russ' temper was famous in the neighborhood and business lagged until his three pretty, personable daughters--Haddie, Ida and Anne--took over behind the counter. In 1978, after 10 years of practicing law, Mark Russ Federman, Ane's son, returned to the family business to help run the operation alongside his wife, Maria. In 2002, Joshua Russ Tupper left his career as a chemical engineer to continue to the family legacy, and was joined by cousin Niki Russ Federman in 2006. In the early days, stock was limited to schmaltz herring, pickles and salt-cured lox. Today, offerings include whitefish, sable, sturgeon, caviar, salmon, gravlax, herring, nuts, dried fruit, halvah and chocolate.
NYC - LES - Russ & Daughters Russ & Daughters, located at 179 East Houston Street, is a fourth-generation appetizing store. Joel Russ, an immigrant from Eastern Europe, arrived on New York's lower east side at the turn of the century and starting out selling herrings from a pushcart. In 1914, he opened a storefront on Orchard Street before moving into the present former tenement building around the corner in 1920. He called it "Russ' Cut-Rate Appetizers. Russ' temper was famous in the neighborhood and business lagged until his three pretty, personable daughters--Haddie, Ida and Anne--took over behind the counter. In 1978, after 10 years of practicing law, Mark Russ Federman, Ane's son, returned to the family business to help run the operation alongside his wife, Maria. In 2002, Joshua Russ Tupper left his career as a chemical engineer to continue to the family legacy, and was joined by cousin Niki Russ Federman in 2006. In the early days, stock was limited to schmaltz herring, pickles and salt-cured lox. Today, offerings include whitefish, sable, sturgeon, caviar, salmon, gravlax, herring, nuts, dried fruit, halvah and chocolate. Russ & Daughters' Super Heeb sandwich was selected #50 on The 101 Best Sandwiches in New York by Grub Street and New York Magazine.
NYC - LES - Russ & Daughters Russ & Daughters, located at 179 East Houston Street, is a fourth-generation appetizing store. Joel Russ, an immigrant from Eastern Europe, arrived on New York's lower east side at the turn of the century and starting out selling herrings from a pushcart. In 1914, he opened a storefront on Orchard Street before moving into the present former tenement building around the corner in 1920. He called it "Russ' Cut-Rate Appetizers. Russ' temper was famous in the neighborhood and business lagged until his three pretty, personable daughters--Haddie, Ida and Anne--took over behind the counter. In 1978, after 10 years of practicing law, Mark Russ Federman, Anne's son, returned to the family business to help run the operation alongside his wife, Maria. In 2002, Joshua Russ Tupper left his career as a chemical engineer to continue to the family legacy, and was joined by cousin Niki Russ Federman in 2006. In the early days, stock was limited to schmaltz herring, pickles and salt-cured lox. Today, offerings include whitefish, sable, sturgeon, caviar, salmon, gravlax, herring, nuts, dried fruit, halvah and chocolate. Scandinavian Grav Lox (left) is not smoked, but cured and coated in a delicate brine of salt, sugar and dill. Wild Western Nova (center) is a wild king salmon from the Pacific. Its lean body has very little fat and captures the light wood smoke wonderfully. Old Fashioned Belly Lox (right) is the most traditional appetizing staple-- the juicy mid-section of a side of salmon cured in a special salt brine.
NYC - LES - Russ & Daughters Russ & Daughters, located at 179 East Houston Street, is a fourth-generation appetizing store. Joel Russ, an immigrant from Eastern Europe, arrived on New York's lower east side at the turn of the century and starting out selling herrings from a pushcart. In 1914, he opened a storefront on Orchard Street before moving into the present former tenement building around the corner in 1920. He called it "Russ' Cut-Rate Appetizers. Russ' temper was famous in the neighborhood and business lagged until his three pretty, personable daughters--Haddie, Ida and Anne--took over behind the counter. In 1978, after 10 years of practicing law, Mark Russ Federman, Ane's son, returned to the family business to help run the operation alongside his wife, Maria. In 2002, Joshua Russ Tupper left his career as a chemical engineer to continue to the family legacy, and was joined by cousin Niki Russ Federman in 2006. In the early days, stock was limited to schmaltz herring, pickles and salt-cured lox. Today, offerings include whitefish, sable, sturgeon, caviar, salmon, gravlax, herring, nuts, dried fruit, halvah and chocolate. Chubs are a smaller version of a whitefish. Kippered / Baked Salmon is one of the crown jewels of appetizing foods. The special slow, hot smoking process renders the salmon amazingly tender and moist.
NYC - LES - Katz's Delicatessen In 1888, a Russian immirant family established a Jewish delicatessen at 205 E Houston Street on the Lower East Side. Aside from the advent of refigeration, little has changed at Katz's deli since then, as it still retains a grungy sheen to its throngs of tourists, regulars and celebrities. Today Katz's makes about 5,000 pounds of corned beef (cured for 30 days, compared to commerciall prepared 36-hour corned beef), 2,000 pounds of salami and 12,000 hot dogs a week--the old-fashioned way, on the premises. During World War II, with owner's three sons overseas and a family tradition of sending food, Katz's encouraged parents to "Send a Salami to Your Boy in the Army." To this day, they will still ship anywhere in the world. It became one of the deli's famous catch phrases, along with "Katz's, that's all!" which is still painted on the side of the building. Katz's has played a pivotal setting in a number of movies. Most notably, when Meg Ryan faked an orgasm in "When Harry Met Sally..." The table at which she and Billy Crystal sat is marked with a sign that reads "Where Harry Met Sally...hope you had what she had!" Other famous scenes include Johnny Depp meeting his FBI contact in "Donnie Brasco" and Judge Reinhold grabbing a bite in Offbeat. The walls present a photographic guest list that's a venerable "Who is Who" in culture, sports, entertainment and politics. Katz's Deli was featured on the Travel Channel show, Man Vs. Food
NYC - LES: Delancey Street-Essex Street Subway Station - Shad Crossing
NYC - LES: Delancey Street-Essex Street Subway Station - Shad Crossing
NYC - LES: Delancey Street-Essex Street Subway Station - Shad Crossing
NYC - Chinatown - Mei Dick Barber Shop Mei Dick Barber Shop, at 37 Mott Street.
NYC - Chinatown - McDonald's
NYC - Chinatown - Vivi Bubble Tea
NYC - Chinatown - Vivi Bubble Tea
NYC - Chinatown - The Original Chinatown Ice Cream Factory The Chinatown Ice Cream Factory, at 65 Bayard Street, was established in 1978.
NYC - Chinatown - Hillary vs. Obama Explore: February 3, 2008
NYC - Chinatown - Fried Dumpling
NYC - Chinatown - New Beef King Corp. Hong Kong-native Robert Yee brought back his family recipe for beef jerky and opened his own beef jerky store at 89 Bayard Street in Chinatown. Yee doesn't dehydrate the meat--baking it slowly through 4 different temperature ovens, and then grilled.
NYC - Chinatown - Columbus Park This building was erected by the Department of Public Parks in 1897.

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