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NYC - SoHo: Lasso and Mr. Brainwash
NYC - SoHo - Spay This! by Red Nose
NYC - SoHo: Outside NY - Mode2 Mode2 painted this mural on Canal Street and Greene Street to coincide with Lazarides Gallery's Outsiders New York exhibition. Conor Harrington did a piece on West 13th Street and Washington Street, and Jr. did pieces on Houston and Bowery, and 1st and A. Outsiders New York was on exhibit at 282-284 Bowery from September 26th to October 12, 2008 and featured works from Faile, Paul Insect, JR, Antony Micallef, Jonathan Yeo, Miranda Donovan, Invader, David Choe, Mark Jenkins, Todd James, Vhils, Polly Morgan, Mode 2, BAST, Conor Harrington, Zevs, Blu, Borf and Ian Francis.
NYC - SoHo: Outside NY - Mode2 Mode2 painted this mural on Canal Street and Greene Street to coincide with Lazarides Gallery's Outsiders New York exhibition. Conor Harrington did a piece on West 13th Street and Washington Street, and Jr. did pieces on Houston and Bowery, and 1st and A. Outsiders New York was on exhibit at 282-284 Bowery from September 26th to October 12, 2008 and featured works from Faile, Paul Insect, JR, Antony Micallef, Jonathan Yeo, Miranda Donovan, Invader, David Choe, Mark Jenkins, Todd James, Vhils, Polly Morgan, Mode 2, BAST, Conor Harrington, Zevs, Blu, Borf and Ian Francis.
NYC - SoHo: Outside NY - Mode2 Mode2 painted this mural on Canal Street and Greene Street to coincide with Lazarides Gallery's Outsiders New York exhibition. Conor Harrington did a piece on West 13th Street and Washington Street, and Jr. did pieces on Houston and Bowery, and 1st and A. Outsiders New York was on exhibit at 282-284 Bowery from September 26th to October 12, 2008 and featured works from Faile, Paul Insect, JR, Antony Micallef, Jonathan Yeo, Miranda Donovan, Invader, David Choe, Mark Jenkins, Todd James, Vhils, Polly Morgan, Mode 2, BAST, Conor Harrington, Zevs, Blu, Borf and Ian Francis.
NYC - SoHo: Outside NY - Mode2 Mode2 painted this mural on Canal Street and Greene Street to coincide with Lazarides Gallery's Outsiders New York exhibition. Conor Harrington did a piece on West 13th Street and Washington Street, and Jr. did pieces on Houston and Bowery, and 1st and A. Outsiders New York was on exhibit at 282-284 Bowery from September 26th to October 12, 2008 and featured works from Faile, Paul Insect, JR, Antony Micallef, Jonathan Yeo, Miranda Donovan, Invader, David Choe, Mark Jenkins, Todd James, Vhils, Polly Morgan, Mode 2, BAST, Conor Harrington, Zevs, Blu, Borf and Ian Francis.
NYC - SoHo: Outside NY - Mode2 Mode2 painted this mural on Canal Street and Greene Street to coincide with Lazarides Gallery's Outsiders New York exhibition. Conor Harrington did a piece on West 13th Street and Washington Street, and Jr. did pieces on Houston and Bowery, and 1st and A. Outsiders New York was on exhibit at 282-284 Bowery from September 26th to October 12, 2008 and featured works from Faile, Paul Insect, JR, Antony Micallef, Jonathan Yeo, Miranda Donovan, Invader, David Choe, Mark Jenkins, Todd James, Vhils, Polly Morgan, Mode 2, BAST, Conor Harrington, Zevs, Blu, Borf and Ian Francis.
NYC - SoHo: Streetart by Mike Marcus
NYC - SoHo - Sticker Art by Norman Yeung
NYC - SoHo - I Love Pizza, New York Loves Me
NYC - SoHo - Stencil art by Stikman
NYC - SoHo: O.K. Harris - David Buckingham's Travis Bickle III David Buckingham's Travis Bickle III, one of his cut and welded found metal Gun series, was part of a solo exhibit, Dark Side of the Moon at OK Harris in 2008. OK Harris was founded by Ivan C. Karp in 1969 in the SoHo district of Manhattan. After having been co-director of Leo Castelli Gallery from 1959-1969 during which time he was instrumental in launching the careers of pop artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Tom Wesselmann and John Chamberlain, Ivan broke away and decided to launch his own gallery. Its establishment in SoHo as the first gallery on West Broadway helped inspire the development of the area’s fine arts character. In addition to being at the forefront of the Photo Realist movement in 1969, OK Harris was among the first galleries to exhibit the work of Duane Hanson, Deborah Butterfield, Manny Farber, Richard Pettibone, Robert Cottingham, Robert Bechtle, Marilyn Levine, Nancy Rubins, Malcolm Morley, Luis Jiminez, Jake Berthot, Jack Goldstein, Porfirio DiDonna, Al Souza and Arman. OK Harris exhibits contemporary art and photography, and on occasion mounts shows of antiques and collectibles. In it’s capacious facility, it is able to mount five, one - person shows simultaneously and has seven such exhibitions in the course of a year. The gallery maintains a complete photographic archive on its exhibitions from the time of its inception, available to students and scholars for research, without reservation.
NYC - SoHo - Without You I'm Nothing by Fitschen
NYC - SoHo - Sold Here by Fitschen
NYC - SoHo - Streetart
NYC - SoHo - Streetart by Fitschen
NYC - SoHo - Streetart by KH1
NYC - SoHo: East River Savings Bank Building The Spring, formerly the East River Savings Bank building, at 225 Lafayette Street, was built in 1927 to the design of Cass Gilbert. The 14-story building has a three-story limestone base with very tall colonnades on both Lafayette and Spring Streets. Its corner is chamfered. The beige-brick building has a nice deep cornice and stringcourses at the third, fourth and 12th floors. On the seventh floor in the late 1940s and '50s were the offices of EC Comics, whose horror comics like Tales From the Crypt were the focus of the comic book panic of the mid-'50s. EC also originated Mad magazine here. The former bank was converted to residences in 2004 by Africa Israel Investments.
NYC - SoHo: La Esquina La Esquina Taqueria and Cafe, located in the former Corner Deli at 114 Kenmare Street, is owned by Serge Becker, designer and nightlife entrepreneur.
NYC - La Esquina La Esquina, formerly the Corner Deli, at 114 Kenmare Street.
NYC - SoHo: Duarte Square - Juan Pablo Duarte statue In the late 1600s the land that is now Juan Pablo Duarte Square was developed as a farm by Trinity Church. A forty-foot-wide canal was built to the south in 1810 to drain the pestilent Collect Pond into the Hudson River. The canal was filled in 1819 and now forms Canal Street. As the city spread northward, this became an important commercial thoroughfare. Canal Street achieved further prominence with the construction of the Holland Tunnel at its western end in 1927. Juan Pablo Duarte Square was officially dedicated in 1945, when Sixth Avenue was renamed Avenue of the Americas in celebration of Pan-American unity. The name of the square, located near the southern end of the Avenue of the Americas, honors Juan Pablo Duarte (1813-1876), the liberator of the Dominican Republic. As a young man, Duarte founded a society called La Trinitaria which sought to promote democratic ideals among the Spanish-speaking inhabitants of Hispaniola Island, most of whom were clustered around the city of Santo Domingo. In 1843 Duarte launched an attempt to free the eastern half of the island from Haitian rule. When the rebellion failed, Duarte fled Hispaniola. However, when a new revolution succeeded in winning independence for the Dominican Republic in February 1844, Duarte was invited to return as President of the new republic. Although he eventually lost control to a military dictator and died in exile, Duarte was instrumental in developing the Pan-American traditions of democracy and self-government celebrated by the Avenue of the Americas. Duarte Square, a triangular plot bounded by Sullivan Street, Grand Street, and the Avenue of the Americas at the intersection with Canal Street, was initially developed and maintained by the Department of Transportation. The square was improved in 1975 with the addition of benches, trees, and sidewalks. On May 26, 1977, Duarte Square was transferred to the Department of Parks. A statue of Juan Pablo Duarte, donated by the Consulate of the Dominican Republic, was dedicated in the square on the 165th anniversary of Duarte’s birth, January 26, 1978. The thirteen-foot bronze figure, which rests atop an eight-foot granite base, was designed by the Italian sculptor Nicola Arrighini. It is one of a pantheon of six monuments to Latin American leaders which overlook the Avenue of the Americas.
NYC - SoHo: Duarte Square - Juan Pablo Duarte statue In the late 1600s the land that is now Juan Pablo Duarte Square was developed as a farm by Trinity Church. A forty-foot-wide canal was built to the south in 1810 to drain the pestilent Collect Pond into the Hudson River. The canal was filled in 1819 and now forms Canal Street. As the city spread northward, this became an important commercial thoroughfare. Canal Street achieved further prominence with the construction of the Holland Tunnel at its western end in 1927. Juan Pablo Duarte Square was officially dedicated in 1945, when Sixth Avenue was renamed Avenue of the Americas in celebration of Pan-American unity. The name of the square, located near the southern end of the Avenue of the Americas, honors Juan Pablo Duarte (1813-1876), the liberator of the Dominican Republic. As a young man, Duarte founded a society called La Trinitaria which sought to promote democratic ideals among the Spanish-speaking inhabitants of Hispaniola Island, most of whom were clustered around the city of Santo Domingo. In 1843 Duarte launched an attempt to free the eastern half of the island from Haitian rule. When the rebellion failed, Duarte fled Hispaniola. However, when a new revolution succeeded in winning independence for the Dominican Republic in February 1844, Duarte was invited to return as President of the new republic. Although he eventually lost control to a military dictator and died in exile, Duarte was instrumental in developing the Pan-American traditions of democracy and self-government celebrated by the Avenue of the Americas. Duarte Square, a triangular plot bounded by Sullivan Street, Grand Street, and the Avenue of the Americas at the intersection with Canal Street, was initially developed and maintained by the Department of Transportation. The square was improved in 1975 with the addition of benches, trees, and sidewalks. On May 26, 1977, Duarte Square was transferred to the Department of Parks. A statue of Juan Pablo Duarte, donated by the Consulate of the Dominican Republic, was dedicated in the square on the 165th anniversary of Duarte’s birth, January 26, 1978. The thirteen-foot bronze figure, which rests atop an eight-foot granite base, was designed by the Italian sculptor Nicola Arrighini. It is one of a pantheon of six monuments to Latin American leaders which overlook the Avenue of the Americas.
NYC - SoHo: OBEY Giant - Toxicity Inspector Toxicity Inspector was originally created in 2007, OBEY Giant is a street art campaign by artist and guerrilla marketer Shepard Fairey. The campaign originated with the André the Giant Has a Posse sticker that Fairey created in 1986 in Charleston, South Carolina. Distributed by the skater community, the stickers began showing up everywhere. In 1989, while a student at RISD (Rhode Island School of Design), Fairey released his manifesto and the Obey Giant campaign was born. The campaign, an "experiment in phenomenology" pushed primarily through stickers and prints, has a mission to attempts to stimulate curiosity and bring people to question both the campaign and their relationship with their surroundings. Because people are not used to seeing advertisements or propaganda for which the motive is not obvious, frequent and novel encounters with Obey propaganda provoke thought and possible frustration, nevertheless revitalizing the viewer's perception and attention to detail. Over time the artwork has been reused in a number of ways, most famously in with his "Hope" campaign poster for Barack Obama in the 2008 United States Presidential election.
NYC - SoHo - Streetart - Hillary-Obama 08
NYC - TriBeCa: Cary Building Erected in 1857 by William H. Cary, in the midst of a westward construction boom, for the dry-goods firm of Cary, Howard and Sanger, which dated to the 1830's. Designed by King & Kellum, and cast by Daniel Badger's Architectural Iron Works, the Cary Building has twin five-story cast-iron facades facing Chambers and Reade Street (the later of which is pictured here). Cary died in 1861, and although Cary, Howard & Sanger dissolved, the family held onto 105 Chambers through the 1950's. During the 1920's, Chambers Street was widened, giving the Cary Building not only its current corner position, but also a decidedly unimpressive contrasting eastern facade. At the turn of the 21st century, Chambers Street L.L.C., undertook an extensive restoration. Martin J. Marcus desighned commercial spaces for the first four floors. Li/Saltzman Architects designed residential spaces for the top floor. The exterior, which had fallen to extensive rust stains, was restored to its original paint color, after a microscopic paint analysis performed by Historic Preservation and Illumination. The Cary Building was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1982.
NYC - TriBeCa: AT&T Long Lines Building The AT&T Long Lines Building, at 33 Thomas Street, was built in 1974 to the design of John Carl Warnecke & Associates. The 551-foot, 29-story tall almost "windowless" tower--an extreme example of the Brutalist architectural style--was designed to provide security and protection of the expensive equipment houses inside. Another bi-product of the technical nature of its occupant, each floor is built 18 feet high, nearly double the normal office building. The exterior walls are pink-colored Swedish granite-faced precast concrete panels, and the building has six large protrusions which rise to the top.
NYC - TriBeCa: Grosvenor Building Grosvenor Building, a former warehouse, at 385 Broadway was designed by Charles Wright in 1875.
NYC - TriBeCa: Grosvenor Building Grosvenor Building, a former warehouse, at 385 Broadway was designed by Charles Wright in 1875.
NYC - TriBeCa: Broadway-Franklin Building The Broadway-Franklin Building, a twelve-story office tower at 366 Broadway, was built in 1907. Designed by Frederick C. Browne, it was originally called the Bernard Semel Building--named after a Jewish philanthropist. It's also been called the Broadway Textile Building and the Collect Pond House Apartments-- the latter name referring to a filled-in lake in what is now Chinatown. The Building has since been redeveloped as residences.
NYC - TriBeCa: Broadway-Franklin Building The Broadway-Franklin Building, a twelve-story office tower at 366 Broadway, was built in 1907. Designed by Frederick C. Browne, it was originally called the Bernard Semel Building--named after a Jewish philanthropist. It's also been called the Broadway Textile Building and the Collect Pond House Apartments-- the latter name referring to a filled-in lake in what is now Chinatown. The Building has since been redeveloped as residences.
NYC - TriBeCa: 346 Broadway The 346 Broadway Building, originally the New York Life Insurance Company Building, was built to the design of Stephen D. Hatch and McKim, Mead & White between 1894 and 1898. The 12-story, neo-Italian Renaissance tower was built as the home office for the New York Life Insurance Company, one of the "Big Three" insurance companies, chartered in 1841 as the Nautilus Insurance Company. New York Life moved to a new building in Madison Square in 1928, and New York City acquired 346 in 1968, using it today for municipal office space. The eastern rear section was designed by Hatch and originally intended to harmonize with the old New York Life building from 1868-1870, then located on the western end of the block. When hatch suddenly died, the commission was turned over to McKim, Mead & White, who demolished the old building and built a new palazzo-style tower on Broadway. Both the interior and exterior of the New York Life Insurance Building were designated landmarks by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1987. National Register #82003376 (1982)
NYC - TriBeCa: 346 Broadway The 346 Broadway Building, originally the New York Life Insurance Company Building, was built to the design of Stephen D. Hatch and McKim, Mead & White between 1894 and 1898. The 12-story, neo-Italian Renaissance tower was built as the home office for the New York Life Insurance Company, one of the "Big Three" insurance companies, chartered in 1841 as the Nautilus Insurance Company. New York Life moved to a new building in Madison Square in 1928, and New York City acquired 346 in 1968, using it today for municipal office space. The eastern rear section was designed by Hatch and originally intended to harmonize with the old New York Life building from 1868-1870, then located on the western end of the block. When hatch suddenly died, the commission was turned over to McKim, Mead & White, who demolished the old building and built a new palazzo-style tower on Broadway. Both the interior and exterior of the New York Life Insurance Building were designated landmarks by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1987. National Register #82003376 (1982)
NYC - TriBeCa: 346 Broadway The 346 Broadway Building, originally the New York Life Insurance Company Building, was built to the design of Stephen D. Hatch and McKim, Mead & White between 1894 and 1898. The 12-story, neo-Italian Renaissance tower was built as the home office for the New York Life Insurance Company, one of the "Big Three" insurance companies, chartered in 1841 as the Nautilus Insurance Company. New York Life moved to a new building in Madison Square in 1928, and New York City acquired 346 in 1968, using it today for municipal office space. The eastern rear section was designed by Hatch and originally intended to harmonize with the old New York Life building from 1868-1870, then located on the western end of the block. When hatch suddenly died, the commission was turned over to McKim, Mead & White, who demolished the old building and built a new palazzo-style tower on Broadway. Both the interior and exterior of the New York Life Insurance Building were designated landmarks by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1987. National Register #82003376 (1982)
NYC - TriBeCa: 346 Broadway The 346 Broadway Building, originally the New York Life Insurance Company Building, was built to the design of Stephen D. Hatch and McKim, Mead & White between 1894 and 1898. The 12-story, neo-Italian Renaissance tower was built as the home office for the New York Life Insurance Company, one of the "Big Three" insurance companies, chartered in 1841 as the Nautilus Insurance Company. New York Life moved to a new building in Madison Square in 1928, and New York City acquired 346 in 1968, using it today for municipal office space. The eastern rear section was designed by Hatch and originally intended to harmonize with the old New York Life building from 1868-1870, then located on the western end of the block. When hatch suddenly died, the commission was turned over to McKim, Mead & White, who demolished the old building and built a new palazzo-style tower on Broadway. Both the interior and exterior of the New York Life Insurance Building were designated landmarks by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1987. National Register #82003376 (1982)
NYC - TriBeCa: 8 Thomas Street The David S. Brown Store, also known as the 8 Thomas Street Building, was built to the design of Jarvis Morgan Slade in 1875-76. The David S. Brown Company was established in 1808 as a tallow chandlery and by the 1870's was one of the most successfuly producers of laundry and toilet soaps. It has since been converted to a residential development with four interior lofts. The narrow, red-brick-faced five-story building, just three bays wide, is a rare remaining example of New York Ruskinian High Victorian Gothic masonry design. The use of banded stone arches and other Venetian Gothic motifs are heavily indebted to the influence of English theorist John Ruskin, while the cast iron of the ground floor indicates Slad interest in French architectural theory. The David S. Brown Store, also known as the 8 Thomas Street Building, was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978. National Register #80002705 (1980)
NYC - TriBeCa: AT&T Long Lines Building The AT&T Long Lines Building, at 33 Thomas Street, was built in 1974 to the design of John Carl Warnecke & Associates. The 551-foot, 29-story tall almost "windowless" tower--an extreme example of the Brutalist architectural style--was designed to provide security and protection of the expensive equipment houses inside. Another bi-product of the technical nature of its occupant, each floor is built 18 feet high, nearly double the normal office building. The exterior walls are pink-colored Swedish granite-faced precast concrete panels, and the building has six large protrusions which rise to the top.
USS Intrepid Returns The USS Intrepid (CV/CVA/CVS-11), an Essex-class aircraft carrier converted into a museum ship, returned to its Manhattan pier by way of the Hudson River on October 2, 2008, following a 22-month, $120-million overhaul.
USS Intrepid Returns The USS Intrepid (CV/CVA/CVS-11), an Essex-class aircraft carrier converted into a museum ship, returned to its Manhattan pier by way of the Hudson River on October 2, 2008, following a 22-month, $120-million overhaul.
dog man art street
NYC - LES: Doughnut Plant - Marzipan Nutcracker Doughnut Doughnut Plant was first started in 1994, out of the basement of a Lower East Side tenement building, by baker Mark Isreal, and served out of Dean & Deluca, Balducci's and other New York City ocffee shops. In 2000, Doughnut Plant opened up at 379 Grand Street.
NYC - LES: Doughnut Plant Doughnut Plant was first started in 1994, out of the basement of a Lower East Side tenement building, by baker Mark Isreal, and served out of Dean & Deluca, Balducci's and other New York City ocffee shops. In 2000, Doughnut Plant opened up at 379 Grand Street.
NYC - LES: Sports Mural A mural by Chico on Columbia Street and Rivington Street, features Michael Jordan, a motley crew of unknown athletes, and Mickey Mouse. The neighborhood is filled with Chico's renegade work which dates back to the early 80's when he used to tag old redbird subway cars. He is often credited with transforming subway graffiti into a more accepted art form. His first mural — long gone — was a jab at then President Reagan: a tank driving toward the words "World War III." Then local businesses offered to pay him $100, then more, to paint walls near their stores creating an eclectic range of art.
NYC - LES: Sports Mural - Michael Jordan A mural by Chico on Columbia Street and Rivington Street, features Michael Jordan, a motley crew of unknown athletes, and Mickey Mouse. The neighborhood is filled with Chico's renegade work which dates back to the early 80's when he used to tag old redbird subway cars. He is often credited with transforming subway graffiti into a more accepted art form. His first mural — long gone — was a jab at then President Reagan: a tank driving toward the words "World War III." Then local businesses offered to pay him $100, then more, to paint walls near their stores creating an eclectic range of art.
NYC - LES: Mickey Mouse Mural A mural by Chico on Columbia Street and Rivington Street, features Michael Jordan, a motley crew of unknown athletes, and Mickey Mouse. The neighborhood is filled with Chico's renegade work which dates back to the early 80's when he used to tag old redbird subway cars. He is often credited with transforming subway graffiti into a more accepted art form. His first mural — long gone — was a jab at then President Reagan: a tank driving toward the words "World War III." Then local businesses offered to pay him $100, then more, to paint walls near their stores creating an eclectic range of art.
NYC - LES: Batman streetart
NYC - LES: Williamsburg Bridge The Williamsburg Bridge, a suspension bridge connecting Manhattan at Delancey St. with the Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg across the East River, was opened on December 19, 1903 at a cost of $12,000. Construction on the bridge began in 1896, with Leffert L. Buck as chief engineer, Henry Hornbostel as architect and Holton D. Robinson as assistant engineer. At its completion, the Williamsburg Bridge was the largest suspension bridge on Earth, and remained so until the Bear Mountain Bridge was completed in 1924. Its design is unconventional for suspension bridges. Though the main span hangs from cables in the usual manner, the side spans leading to the approaches are cantilevered, drawing no support from the cables above. The entire bridge is 7308 feet (2227 m) long between cable anchor terminals, and the deck is 118 feet (36 m) wide. The main span is 1600 feet (488 m) long. The height at the center of the bridge is 135 feet (41 m) and each tower is 335 feet (102 m). The Williamsburg Bridge carries vehicle, rail and pedestrian traffic. It has 8 lanes of roadway, and 2 tracks which support the J, M, and Z trains of the New York City subway. In the early part of the 20th century, the bridge also carried trolleys and cable tracks.
NYC - LES: East River Park and Williamsburg Bridge The Williamsburg Bridge, a suspension bridge connecting Manhattan at Delancey St. with the Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg across the East River, was opened on December 19, 1903 at a cost of $12,000. Construction on the bridge began in 1896, with Leffert L. Buck as chief engineer, Henry Hornbostel as architect and Holton D. Robinson as assistant engineer. At its completion, the Williamsburg Bridge was the largest suspension bridge on Earth, and remained so until the Bear Mountain Bridge was completed in 1924. Its design is unconventional for suspension bridges. Though the main span hangs from cables in the usual manner, the side spans leading to the approaches are cantilevered, drawing no support from the cables above. The entire bridge is 7308 feet (2227 m) long between cable anchor terminals, and the deck is 118 feet (36 m) wide. The main span is 1600 feet (488 m) long. The height at the center of the bridge is 135 feet (41 m) and each tower is 335 feet (102 m). East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shorline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - LES: East River Park and Williamsburg Bridge The Williamsburg Bridge, a suspension bridge connecting Manhattan at Delancey St. with the Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg across the East River, was opened on December 19, 1903 at a cost of $12,000. Construction on the bridge began in 1896, with Leffert L. Buck as chief engineer, Henry Hornbostel as architect and Holton D. Robinson as assistant engineer. At its completion, the Williamsburg Bridge was the largest suspension bridge on Earth, and remained so until the Bear Mountain Bridge was completed in 1924. Its design is unconventional for suspension bridges. Though the main span hangs from cables in the usual manner, the side spans leading to the approaches are cantilevered, drawing no support from the cables above. The entire bridge is 7308 feet (2227 m) long between cable anchor terminals, and the deck is 118 feet (36 m) wide. The main span is 1600 feet (488 m) long. The height at the center of the bridge is 135 feet (41 m) and each tower is 335 feet (102 m). East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shorline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - LES: East River Park and Williamsburg Bridge The Williamsburg Bridge, a suspension bridge connecting Manhattan at Delancey St. with the Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg across the East River, was opened on December 19, 1903 at a cost of $12,000. Construction on the bridge began in 1896, with Leffert L. Buck as chief engineer, Henry Hornbostel as architect and Holton D. Robinson as assistant engineer. At its completion, the Williamsburg Bridge was the largest suspension bridge on Earth, and remained so until the Bear Mountain Bridge was completed in 1924. Its design is unconventional for suspension bridges. Though the main span hangs from cables in the usual manner, the side spans leading to the approaches are cantilevered, drawing no support from the cables above. The entire bridge is 7308 feet (2227 m) long between cable anchor terminals, and the deck is 118 feet (36 m) wide. The main span is 1600 feet (488 m) long. The height at the center of the bridge is 135 feet (41 m) and each tower is 335 feet (102 m). East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shorline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.

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