Вход в личный кабинет
Логин (не зарегистрированы?):
Пароль (забыли?):
Также можно войти, используя:
Google Яндекс Yahoo
Войти

Фото, сделанные другими фотоаппаратами Canon:

Список всех фотокамер →

Фото, сделанные Canon PowerShot SD1100 IS (Canon)

NYC - LES: Doughnut Plant - Marzipan Nutcracker Doughnut Doughnut Plant was first started in 1994, out of the basement of a Lower East Side tenement building, by baker Mark Isreal, and served out of Dean & Deluca, Balducci's and other New York City ocffee shops. In 2000, Doughnut Plant opened up at 379 Grand Street.
NYC - LES: Doughnut Plant Doughnut Plant was first started in 1994, out of the basement of a Lower East Side tenement building, by baker Mark Isreal, and served out of Dean & Deluca, Balducci's and other New York City ocffee shops. In 2000, Doughnut Plant opened up at 379 Grand Street.
NYC - LES: Sports Mural A mural by Chico on Columbia Street and Rivington Street, features Michael Jordan, a motley crew of unknown athletes, and Mickey Mouse. The neighborhood is filled with Chico's renegade work which dates back to the early 80's when he used to tag old redbird subway cars. He is often credited with transforming subway graffiti into a more accepted art form. His first mural — long gone — was a jab at then President Reagan: a tank driving toward the words "World War III." Then local businesses offered to pay him $100, then more, to paint walls near their stores creating an eclectic range of art.
NYC - LES: Sports Mural - Michael Jordan A mural by Chico on Columbia Street and Rivington Street, features Michael Jordan, a motley crew of unknown athletes, and Mickey Mouse. The neighborhood is filled with Chico's renegade work which dates back to the early 80's when he used to tag old redbird subway cars. He is often credited with transforming subway graffiti into a more accepted art form. His first mural — long gone — was a jab at then President Reagan: a tank driving toward the words "World War III." Then local businesses offered to pay him $100, then more, to paint walls near their stores creating an eclectic range of art.
NYC - LES: Mickey Mouse Mural A mural by Chico on Columbia Street and Rivington Street, features Michael Jordan, a motley crew of unknown athletes, and Mickey Mouse. The neighborhood is filled with Chico's renegade work which dates back to the early 80's when he used to tag old redbird subway cars. He is often credited with transforming subway graffiti into a more accepted art form. His first mural — long gone — was a jab at then President Reagan: a tank driving toward the words "World War III." Then local businesses offered to pay him $100, then more, to paint walls near their stores creating an eclectic range of art.
NYC - LES: Batman streetart
NYC - LES: Williamsburg Bridge The Williamsburg Bridge, a suspension bridge connecting Manhattan at Delancey St. with the Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg across the East River, was opened on December 19, 1903 at a cost of $12,000. Construction on the bridge began in 1896, with Leffert L. Buck as chief engineer, Henry Hornbostel as architect and Holton D. Robinson as assistant engineer. At its completion, the Williamsburg Bridge was the largest suspension bridge on Earth, and remained so until the Bear Mountain Bridge was completed in 1924. Its design is unconventional for suspension bridges. Though the main span hangs from cables in the usual manner, the side spans leading to the approaches are cantilevered, drawing no support from the cables above. The entire bridge is 7308 feet (2227 m) long between cable anchor terminals, and the deck is 118 feet (36 m) wide. The main span is 1600 feet (488 m) long. The height at the center of the bridge is 135 feet (41 m) and each tower is 335 feet (102 m). The Williamsburg Bridge carries vehicle, rail and pedestrian traffic. It has 8 lanes of roadway, and 2 tracks which support the J, M, and Z trains of the New York City subway. In the early part of the 20th century, the bridge also carried trolleys and cable tracks.
NYC - LES: East River Park and Williamsburg Bridge The Williamsburg Bridge, a suspension bridge connecting Manhattan at Delancey St. with the Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg across the East River, was opened on December 19, 1903 at a cost of $12,000. Construction on the bridge began in 1896, with Leffert L. Buck as chief engineer, Henry Hornbostel as architect and Holton D. Robinson as assistant engineer. At its completion, the Williamsburg Bridge was the largest suspension bridge on Earth, and remained so until the Bear Mountain Bridge was completed in 1924. Its design is unconventional for suspension bridges. Though the main span hangs from cables in the usual manner, the side spans leading to the approaches are cantilevered, drawing no support from the cables above. The entire bridge is 7308 feet (2227 m) long between cable anchor terminals, and the deck is 118 feet (36 m) wide. The main span is 1600 feet (488 m) long. The height at the center of the bridge is 135 feet (41 m) and each tower is 335 feet (102 m). East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shorline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - LES: East River Park and Williamsburg Bridge The Williamsburg Bridge, a suspension bridge connecting Manhattan at Delancey St. with the Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg across the East River, was opened on December 19, 1903 at a cost of $12,000. Construction on the bridge began in 1896, with Leffert L. Buck as chief engineer, Henry Hornbostel as architect and Holton D. Robinson as assistant engineer. At its completion, the Williamsburg Bridge was the largest suspension bridge on Earth, and remained so until the Bear Mountain Bridge was completed in 1924. Its design is unconventional for suspension bridges. Though the main span hangs from cables in the usual manner, the side spans leading to the approaches are cantilevered, drawing no support from the cables above. The entire bridge is 7308 feet (2227 m) long between cable anchor terminals, and the deck is 118 feet (36 m) wide. The main span is 1600 feet (488 m) long. The height at the center of the bridge is 135 feet (41 m) and each tower is 335 feet (102 m). East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shorline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - LES: East River Park and Williamsburg Bridge The Williamsburg Bridge, a suspension bridge connecting Manhattan at Delancey St. with the Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg across the East River, was opened on December 19, 1903 at a cost of $12,000. Construction on the bridge began in 1896, with Leffert L. Buck as chief engineer, Henry Hornbostel as architect and Holton D. Robinson as assistant engineer. At its completion, the Williamsburg Bridge was the largest suspension bridge on Earth, and remained so until the Bear Mountain Bridge was completed in 1924. Its design is unconventional for suspension bridges. Though the main span hangs from cables in the usual manner, the side spans leading to the approaches are cantilevered, drawing no support from the cables above. The entire bridge is 7308 feet (2227 m) long between cable anchor terminals, and the deck is 118 feet (36 m) wide. The main span is 1600 feet (488 m) long. The height at the center of the bridge is 135 feet (41 m) and each tower is 335 feet (102 m). East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shorline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - East River Park - East River Fire Boat House The East River Fire Boat House, in East River Park, was built in 1941 to house the NYC Fire Department's Marine Company 6. ccording to the Fire Department, fireboats were moored here as early as 1877. The building was acquired by the Parks Department in 1994, following the downsizing of NYC Marine Companies due to budget cuts and the de-industrialization of the City’s waterfront. The last fire boat moored at East River Park was the Alfred E. Smith, which is now moored across the river in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shorline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - East River Park: Harbor Seals The East River Park seals, a spray fountain designed by Gerry Augustine Lynas, was installed in 2001. The fountain consists of twenty-seven fiberglass mixed with bronze dust sculptures of harbor seals and turtles. East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shoreline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - East River Park: Harbor Seals The East River Park seals, a spray fountain designed by Gerry Augustine Lynas, was installed in 2001. The fountain consists of twenty-seven fiberglass mixed with bronze dust sculptures of harbor seals and turtles. East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shoreline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - East River Park: Harbor Seals The East River Park seals, a spray fountain designed by Gerry Augustine Lynas, was installed in 2001. The fountain consists of twenty-seven fiberglass mixed with bronze dust sculptures of harbor seals and turtles. East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shoreline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - East River Park: Harbor Seals The East River Park seals, a spray fountain designed by Gerry Augustine Lynas, was installed in 2001. The fountain consists of twenty-seven fiberglass mixed with bronze dust sculptures of harbor seals and turtles. East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shoreline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - East River Park: Harbor Seals The East River Park seals, a spray fountain designed by Gerry Augustine Lynas, was installed in 2001. The fountain consists of twenty-seven fiberglass mixed with bronze dust sculptures of harbor seals and turtles. East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shoreline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - East River Park: Harbor Seals The East River Park seals, a spray fountain designed by Gerry Augustine Lynas, was installed in 2001. The fountain consists of twenty-seven fiberglass mixed with bronze dust sculptures of harbor seals and turtles. East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shoreline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - LES - East River Park: Ampitheater The amphitheater in East River Park was built in 1941, along with an adjacent limestone recreational building, as part of an urban renewal project for the Lower East Side. Joseph Papp, founder of Shakespeare in the Park and the Public Theater, staged Julius Caesar there in 1956. During much of that decade, the amphitheater was the site of free Evening-in-the-Park concerts. Local schools held their graduation ceremonies there, and the Group of Ancient Drama performed free productions of Greek classics. In 1973, however, the amphitheater closed due to a budget shortage. Vandals attacked the neglected theater and by 1980 it was unusable. East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shorline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - LES: Corlear’s Hook Park Dog Runs This park takes its name from the geographic region of southeastern Manhattan that once had the shape of a hook. The Corlear family, 17th century Dutch landowners, controlled much of the property in this curving landmass.. . Today this parkland, located at the intersection of Jackson and Cherry Streets along the East River Drive, affords stunning views of the Williamsburg and Manhattan bridges and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Originally a heavy marshland used by Lenape Native Americans to land their canoes, Dutch settlers of the mid-1600s swiftly took advantage of this area?s graded coastal incline for the loading and unloading of incoming transport vessels.. . During the American Revolutionary War Battle of Brooklyn, the British landing and advance upon General George Washington?s (1732-1799) fleeing Colonial Army was impeded by a series of hastily erected earthen barricades on the site. In 1814 the Corlear neighborhood, as it was briefly called before gradually melding into the Lower East Side, underwent renovations as part of a relief project for thousands of Irish immigrants. By leveling the site?s hills for use in landfill along the waterfront, workers made possible the busy docks that soon encouraged industrial and residential growth in the area.. . In the 1880s, with the rising tide of immigration, rapid local industrialization, and overburdened tenements, the need for a nearby park space increased. Though the City purchased the land for Corlears Hook Park in 1893, the park was not completed until 1905. Through the late 1930s, the park?s broad, tree-lined promenade held a comfort station, playground, and baseball diamond, but when the City began developing the East River?s shoreline in tandem with President Franklin D. Roosevelt?s (1882-1945) Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.), Corlears Hook Park was reduced in size. Directly reacting to the construction of the F.D.R. Drive in the late 1930s, Parks Commissioner Robert Moses (1888-1981) began to draw up and execute plans to take advantage of the new landfill over which the traffic thoroughfare wound.. . Over the next few years, Moses?s addition of several properties along the eastern coastline of Manhattan, including East River Park, began to revitalize the Lower East Side. Though Corlears Hook Park initially lost a large portion of land, the addition of an adjoining 57 acre-long East River Park in the 1940s granted the East Side neighborhoods an even larger area in which to walk and play. Connected by several footbridges and winding paths, the adjoining parks now offer softball fields, areas for roller skating and public performances as well as riverfront walkways to the Lower East Side and the East Village.. . In 1994 Parks Enforcement Patrol (P.E.P), a division of Parks responsible for ensuring the safe use of parkland, moved its Manhattan base of operations from Battery Park to Corlears Hook Park. From this base P.E.P. oversees parks south of 42nd Street.. . In 1995 Corlears Hook Park?s playground underwent renovations. Sponsored by Council Member Antonio Pagan, the $79,000 renovation upgraded the play equipment and added safety surfacing to the play area.
NYC - LES - East River Park: Ampitheater The amphitheater in East River Park was built in 1941, along with an adjacent limestone recreational building, as part of an urban renewal project for the Lower East Side. Joseph Papp, founder of Shakespeare in the Park and the Public Theater, staged Julius Caesar there in 1956. During much of that decade, the amphitheater was the site of free Evening-in-the-Park concerts. Local schools held their graduation ceremonies there, and the Group of Ancient Drama performed free productions of Greek classics. In 1973, however, the amphitheater closed due to a budget shortage. Vandals attacked the neglected theater and by 1980 it was unusable. East River Park runs 57.46 acres alongside the Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) Drive and the East River from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street. It was conceived in the early 1930s when Robert Moses was designing the FDR Drive, also known as the East River Drive. Moses was unable to acquire enough land for the park, so he built a 10-foot wide concrete extension to the eastern shorline, creating enough space. In 1949, when the FDR Drive was widened, a portion of the park between Montgomery and Jackson Streets was eliminated. South Street was extended in 1963, protruding onto another 30-foot section of the park. In 1951, Parks built the 10th Street pedestrian overpass above the FDR Drive, connecting the park with East Village residents, especially allowing easy access to residents of the neighboring Lillian Wald Houses.
NYC - East Houston Street and Bowery
NYC - LES: The New Museum The New Museum, founded as the New Museum of Contemporary Art by Marcia Tucker in 1977, is the only museum in New York City exclusively devoted to presenting contemporary art from around the world. On December 1, 2007, the New Museum opened its first freestanding, dedicated building at 235 Bowery. The building, designed by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA with Gensler, New York, serving as Executive Architect, is expressed as a series of six asymetrically stacked aluminium-clad rectilinear boxes shifted off-axis around a central steel core. Sejima + Nishizawa's inspiration came from the traditional set-backs exhibited by some of the city's earlier skyscrapers. The façade is shrouded in 3,270 square metres of expanded aluminium, originally developed in the United Kingdom as a means of reinforcing roads. It was the first time this medium has been employed in the United States. The basement of the New Museum features a 188-seat theatre.
NYC - LES: The New Museum - Hell Yes! Ugo Rondonine's Hell, Yes!, the large-scale rainbow-striped sculpture displayed on the outside façade of the New Museum, was executed out of perspex, aluminum, neon and transparent film by Swiss sculptor Ugo Rondonine in 2001. The installation encapsulates the philosophy of openness, fearlessness, and optimism that surrounds the New Museum’s reemergence in the contemporary art community, as well as its history as the home of socially committed contemporary art. The program was made possible by an endowment from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Trust. The New Museum, founded as the New Museum of Contemporary Art by Marcia Tucker in 1977, is the only museum in New York City exclusively devoted to presenting contemporary art from around the world. On December 1, 2007, the New Museum opened its first freestanding, dedicated building at 235 Bowery. The building, designed by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA with Gensler, New York, serving as Executive Architect, is expressed as a series of six asymetrically stacked aluminium-clad rectilinear boxes shifted off-axis around a central steel core. Sejima + Nishizawa's inspiration came from the traditional set-backs exhibited by some of the city's earlier skyscrapers. The façade is shrouded in 3,270 square metres of expanded aluminium, originally developed in the United Kingdom as a means of reinforcing roads. It was the first time this medium has been employed in the United States. The basement of the New Museum features a 188-seat theatre.
NYC - LES: The New Museum The New Museum, founded as the New Museum of Contemporary Art by Marcia Tucker in 1977, is the only museum in New York City exclusively devoted to presenting contemporary art from around the world. On December 1, 2007, the New Museum opened its first freestanding, dedicated building at 235 Bowery. The building, designed by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA with Gensler, New York, serving as Executive Architect, is expressed as a series of six asymetrically stacked aluminium-clad rectilinear boxes shifted off-axis around a central steel core. Sejima + Nishizawa's inspiration came from the traditional set-backs exhibited by some of the city's earlier skyscrapers. The façade is shrouded in 3,270 square metres of expanded aluminium, originally developed in the United Kingdom as a means of reinforcing roads. It was the first time this medium has been employed in the United States. The basement of the New Museum features a 188-seat theatre.
NYC - LES: The New Museum The New Museum, founded as the New Museum of Contemporary Art by Marcia Tucker in 1977, is the only museum in New York City exclusively devoted to presenting contemporary art from around the world. On December 1, 2007, the New Museum opened its first freestanding, dedicated building at 235 Bowery. The building, designed by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA with Gensler, New York, serving as Executive Architect, is expressed as a series of six asymetrically stacked aluminium-clad rectilinear boxes shifted off-axis around a central steel core. Sejima + Nishizawa's inspiration came from the traditional set-backs exhibited by some of the city's earlier skyscrapers. The façade is shrouded in 3,270 square metres of expanded aluminium, originally developed in the United Kingdom as a means of reinforcing roads. It was the first time this medium has been employed in the United States. The basement of the New Museum features a 188-seat theatre.
I ♥'d NY Before You Moved Here & Made It Suck I Loved NY Before You Moved Here And Made It Suck Explore: November 29, 2008
Vibe An exclusive letter from Obama
NYC - Chinatown - Canal Street Subway Station Canal Street was originally a stream that ran from what was once the "Collect Pond", north of present-day City Hall, to the Hudson River. By the early 19th century, in the wake of a yellow fever epidemic, the pond had become seriously polluted and was identified as a health hazard. In 1805, to drain off the pond, the stream was widened into a canal--hence the name--and both were filled in over a decade later. Opened on January 5, 1918, Canal Street on the BMT Broadway Main Line, serving the N, R and W trains, has four tracks and two side platforms. However, only the local tracks provide through service on the BMT Broadway Line; the "express" tracks, which have never seen revenue service, begin at the lower level of City Hall station and run north to Canal Street, dead-ending about two-thirds of the way through. As part of the Dual Contracts, these express tracks were to have continued up Broadway, fed by traffic from Brooklyn via the Montague Street Tunnel; local service was to have terminated at the upper level of City Hall. That plan was dropped in favor of local service via City Hall upper level and Montague Street and express service via the Manhattan Bridge. Today, just north of this station, the tracks from the south side of the Manhattan Bridge rise up and replace the stub-end express tracks from City Hall lower level. The station was renovated between 1999 and 2004, restored to its original appearance, with with new mosaics featuring Chinese characters. The symbols on the red wall plaques mean "money" and "luck," and the "Canal Street" name tablet has ideographs that actually read "China" and "Town." The Canal Street complex The complex consists of four originally separate stations joined by underground passageways. This BMT Broadway line connects to the 4 and 6 trains on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line; the J, M and Z trains on the BMT Nassau Street line; and the N and Q trains on the BMT Broadway Manhattan Bridge line.
NYC: Outside NY - David Choe David Choe's colorful art adorned the abandoned sign, while Conor Harrington's abstract work filled the ground level wall, at 282 Bowery, formerly Adams Co. Restaurant Equipment Supply for Lazarides Gallery's Outsiders New York exhibition. Outsiders New York was on exhibit here from September 26th to October 12, 2008 and featured works from Faile, Paul Insect, JR, Antony Micallef, Jonathan Yeo, Miranda Donovan, Invader, David Choe, Mark Jenkins, Todd James, Vhils, Polly Morgan, Mode 2, BAST, Conor Harrington, Zevs, Blu, Borf and Ian Francis. Lazarides encompasses gallery spaces in London’s Soho, nearby Charing Cross, Newcastle, and, of course, this website.
NYC - NoLita: Ceci Cela Patisserie Ceci Cela Patisserie, at 55 Spring Street, was opened in 1992 by celebrated French pastry chef Laurent Dupal.
NYC - Chinatown: Little Chinatown Flea Market Little Chinatown Flea Market, on the corner of Lafayette Street and Canal Street, contains a diverse group of low cost retail businesses.
NYC - Chinatown: Little Chinatown Flea Market Little Chinatown Flea Market, on the corner of Lafayette Street and Canal Street, contains a diverse group of low cost retail businesses.
NYC - Excellent Dumpling House Excellent Dumpling House, at 111 Lafayette Street.
NYC - Art in General - Reality Cinema_Life Video Reality Cinema/Live Video, an exhibit by Jan Baracz, was on display at Art in General from September 27 - December 13, 2008. In it, Baracz addressed the "magic" power of the electronic mediation in recording technologies. His project took up the conventions of cinema and probed its history of collective reception. Employing curiosity and voyeurism, Reality Cinema/Live Video playfully tested the tendency to project narratives on everything one sees. Art in General assists artists with with the production and presentation of new work. Founded in 1981 by artists Martin Weinstein and Teresa Liszka in the General Hardware building, it has emerged as one of New York City’s leading nonprofit arts organizations. Housed in a six-floor building, at 79 Walker Street, Art in General has a gallery space dedicated to rotating exhibitions of contemporary art. The gallery is located in the building’s 6th floor, and is approximately 2,000 square feet. Art in General’s second gallery is a storefront space located at street-level. It was donated by Gerry Weinstein, CEO of General Tools, in the fall of 2003. This storefront gallery is approximately 600 square feet. The building’s 4th floor houses Art in General’s dynamic office area. General Tools, Inc. occupies the rest of the building.
NYC: Outside NY - David Choe and Conor Harrington David Choe's colorful art adorned the abandoned sign, while Conor Harrington's abstract work filled the ground level wall, at 282 Bowery, formerly Adams Co. Restaurant Equipment Supply for Lazarides Gallery's Outsiders New York exhibition. Outsiders New York was on exhibit here from September 26th to October 12, 2008 and featured works from rks from Faile, Paul Insect, JR, Antony Micallef, Jonathan Yeo, Miranda Donovan, Invader, David Choe, Mark Jenkins, Todd James, Vhils, Polly Morgan, Mode 2, BAST, Conor Harrington, Zevs, Blu, Borf and Ian Francis. Lazarides encompasses gallery spaces in London’s Soho, nearby Charing Cross, Newcastle, and, of course, this website.
NYC - Little Italy: Rice to Riches Rice to Riches, at 37 Spring Street, was opened by Peter Moceo in 2003. The NoLita shop serves nothing but rice pudding, and 18 varities of it daily.
NYC - Little Italy: Rice to Riches Rice to Riches, at 37 Spring Street, was opened by Peter Moceo in 2003. The NoLita shop serves nothing but rice pudding, and 18 varities of it daily.
NYC - Little Italy: Rice to Riches Rice to Riches, at 37 Spring Street, was opened by Peter Moceo in 2003. The NoLita shop serves nothing but rice pudding, and 18 varities of it daily.
NYC - NoLita: Ceci Cela Patisserie Ceci Cela Patisserie, at 55 Spring Street, was opened in 1992 by celebrated French pastry chef Laurent Dupal.
A Colbert Christmas - The Greatest Gift of All!
NYC - NoLita: Ceci Cela Patisserie Ceci Cela Patisserie, at 55 Spring Street, was opened in 1992 by celebrated French pastry chef Laurent Dupal.
NYC - Water Tower
NYC - Cortland Alley
No Parking
NYC - NoLita: Desalvio Playground - Skelly Skelly, also called skully, skelsy, skellzies, scully, tops or caps, is a children's game usually played on chalk-sketched boards on the pavement. The skelly field of play, or board, is a large square approximately six feet a side. At each corner and along the edges of the board are 12 smaller boxes, labeled 1 to 12 and a center 13th box. Players shoot their "caps"--a bottle cap, poker chip, checker, or some like item--across the board attempting to land on numbers in sequence to become the "killer" so that they may knock all the other caps off the board and out of the game. DeSalvio Playground, at Spring and Mulberry Streets, honors two generations of leaders in New York City’s Italian-American community – John DeSalvio (1881-1948), and his son Louis (1913-1972). The City of New York acquired the property in 1954 by condemnation and assigned it to Parks who opened it on December 15, 1955.
NYC - NoLita: Desalvio Playground DeSalvio Playground, at Spring and Mulberry Streets, honors two generations of leaders in New York City’s Italian-American community – John DeSalvio (1881-1948), and his son Louis (1913-1972). The City of New York acquired the property in 1954 by condemnation and assigned it to Parks who opened it on December 15, 1955.
NYC - Little Italy: Police Building The Police Building Apartments, formerly the Police Headquarters Building, at 240 Centre Street, was built in 1905-09 to the design of Hoppin, Koen & Huntington. Following the creation of Greater New York in 1898, the city's police department expanded rapidly and a large new headquarters building was planned. In 1905 Mayor George McClellan laid the cornerstone of this limestome-faced, steel-framed Edwardian Baroque/Beaux-Artspalace capped with a tall dome. When the Police Department relocated in 1973, there was talk of turning it into everything from a hotel to a community center for Little Italy. In 1983 a development group converted the building into luxury apartments. The Police Building Apartments were designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978. National Register #80002690 (1980)
NYC - Little Italy: Police Building The Police Building Apartments, formerly the Police Headquarters Building, at 240 Centre Street, was built in 1905-09 to the design of Hoppin, Koen & Huntington. Following the creation of Greater New York in 1898, the city's police department expanded rapidly and a large new headquarters building was planned. In 1905 Mayor George McClellan laid the cornerstone of this limestome-faced, steel-framed Edwardian Baroque/Beaux-Artspalace capped with a tall dome. When the Police Department relocated in 1973, there was talk of turning it into everything from a hotel to a community center for Little Italy. In 1983 a development group converted the building into luxury apartments. The Police Building Apartments were designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978. National Register #80002690 (1980)
NYC - Little Italy: Police Building The Police Building Apartments, formerly the Police Headquarters Building, at 240 Centre Street, was built in 1905-09 to the design of Hoppin, Koen & Huntington. Following the creation of Greater New York in 1898, the city's police department expanded rapidly and a large new headquarters building was planned. In 1905 Mayor George McClellan laid the cornerstone of this limestome-faced, steel-framed Edwardian Baroque/Beaux-Artspalace capped with a tall dome. When the Police Department relocated in 1973, there was talk of turning it into everything from a hotel to a community center for Little Italy. In 1983 a development group converted the building into luxury apartments. The Police Building Apartments were designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978. National Register #80002690 (1980)
NYC - Little Italy: Police Building The Police Building Apartments, formerly the Police Headquarters Building, at 240 Centre Street, was built in 1905-09 to the design of Hoppin, Koen & Huntington. Following the creation of Greater New York in 1898, the city's police department expanded rapidly and a large new headquarters building was planned. In 1905 Mayor George McClellan laid the cornerstone of this limestome-faced, steel-framed Edwardian Baroque/Beaux-Artspalace capped with a tall dome. When the Police Department relocated in 1973, there was talk of turning it into everything from a hotel to a community center for Little Italy. In 1983 a development group converted the building into luxury apartments. The Police Building Apartments were designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978. National Register #80002690 (1980)

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10      

← Назад

@VFL_RU Uptime по данным Ping-Admin.Ru - сервиса мониторинга доступности сайтов
Версия для мобильных устройств.
Концепция, программирование и дизайн проекта — «Седжин».
© VFL.RU 2001–2020