Вход в личный кабинет
Логин (не зарегистрированы?):
Пароль (забыли?):
Также можно войти, используя:
Google Яндекс Yahoo
Войти

Фото, сделанные другими фотоаппаратами Canon:

Список всех фотокамер →

Фото, сделанные Canon PowerShot S230 (Canon)

NYC: Holland Tunnel The Holland Tunnel, originally known as the Hudson River Vehicular Tunnel or the Canal Street Tunnel, connects Manhattan with Jersey City under the Hudson River. Begun in 1920 and completed in 1927, it is named after Clifford Milburn Holland, Chief Engineer on the project, who died before it was completed. The tunnel is one of the earliest examples of a ventilated design, having 80 ft diameter fans blowing air in one series of ducts and out another series. Ventilation was required by the advent of the automobile and associated carbon monoxide exhaust. The tunnel consists of a pair of tubes, each providing two lanes in a twenty foot roadway width. The north tube is 8,558 ft from end to end, while the south tube is slightly shorter at just 8,371 ft. Both tubes are situated in the mud beneath the river, with the lowest point of the roadway approximately 93 feet below mean high water. According to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which controls the tunnel, traffic for 2002 totalled 15,764,000 vehicles, 33,926,000 vehicles in 2004, and 33,964,000 vehicles in 2005. The Tunnel is part of Interstate 78. New Jersey State Register (1995) National Register #93001619 (1993)
NYC: SoHo - Houston St - DKNY The DKNY wall has become an icon, serving as the unofficial entrance to SoHo, with its black and white pre-September 11th skyline and a superimposed Statue of Liberty. The mural, which was based on a logo designed by Peter Arnell, was installed on the north side of the six-floor building at 600 Broadway, on the corner of Houston Street, in 1992. It achieved national recongition when it was incorporated into the opening credit sequence for NYPD Blue. In 2008, Abercrombie and Fitch signed a 20-year, $71-million lease to open a 40,000 square-foot store in the building, and DKNY lost the rights to use the wall.
Boston - Kenmore Square: Citgo Kenmore Square exists at the intersection of several Beacon Street, Commonwealth Avenue and Brookline Avenue, abutting Boston University and serving as a transportation hub for nearby Landsdowne Street and Fenway Park. The large, double-faced sign featuring the Citgo "trimark" logo has become a landmark, partly because of its visibility over the Green Monster during televised Red Sox games. The current 60 ft x 60 ft incarnation, unveiled in March 2005 after a six-month restoration project, features thousands of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LEDs were selected for their durability, energy efficiency, intensity, and ease of maintenance. Earlier versions featured neon lighting; the previous sign contained some 5,878 glass tubes with a total length of over five miles. The first sign, featuring the Cities Service logo, was built in 1940, and replaced with the trimark in 1965. In 1979 Governor Edward J. King ordered it turned off as a symbol of energy conservation. Four years later, Citgo attempted to disassemble the weatherbeaten sign, and was surprised to be met with widespread public affection for the sign and protest at its threatened removal. The Boston Landmarks Commission ordered its disassembly postponed while the issue was debated. While never formally declared a landmark, it was refurbished and relit by Citgo in 1983 and has remained in operation ever since. Citgo is now a subidiary of Petróleos de Venezuela S.A. and in 2006, Jerry McDermott, a Boston city councillor, proposed that the sign be removed in response to Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's insults toward America . McDermontt also suggested draping an American flag or Boston Red Sox banner over the sign until Chavez is out of office.
Boston - Kenmore Square: Citgo Kenmore Square exists at the intersection of several Beacon Street, Commonwealth Avenue and Brookline Avenue, abutting Boston University and serving as a transportation hub for nearby Landsdowne Street and Fenway Park. The large, double-faced sign featuring the Citgo "trimark" logo has become a landmark, partly because of its visibility over the Green Monster during televised Red Sox games. The current 60 ft x 60 ft incarnation, unveiled in March 2005 after a six-month restoration project, features thousands of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LEDs were selected for their durability, energy efficiency, intensity, and ease of maintenance. Earlier versions featured neon lighting; the previous sign contained some 5,878 glass tubes with a total length of over five miles. The first sign, featuring the Cities Service logo, was built in 1940, and replaced with the trimark in 1965. In 1979 Governor Edward J. King ordered it turned off as a symbol of energy conservation. Four years later, Citgo attempted to disassemble the weatherbeaten sign, and was surprised to be met with widespread public affection for the sign and protest at its threatened removal. The Boston Landmarks Commission ordered its disassembly postponed while the issue was debated. While never formally declared a landmark, it was refurbished and relit by Citgo in 1983 and has remained in operation ever since. Citgo is now a subidiary of Petróleos de Venezuela S.A. and in 2006, Jerry McDermott, a Boston city councillor, proposed that the sign be removed in response to Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's insults toward America . McDermontt also suggested draping an American flag or Boston Red Sox banner over the sign until Chavez is out of office.
NYC - LES: Bowery Ballroom The Bowery Ballroom is a music venue in the Bowery section of New York City. The structure, at 6 Delancey, a 1929 Beaux Arts construction, was completed weeks before the stock market crash of 1929, replacing a three-story brick theater. What remains of the earlier theater is its stone foundation, exposed in the lower-level lounge. Six Delancey stood vacant through the Great Depression and Second World War, and was then occupied by a number of high-end retail concerns: a jewelry store, a haberdashery, and Treemark Shoes for approximately thirty years. When the neighborhood again fell into decline, the store housed lighting and carpet stores until the Bowery Ballroom took possession of the space in 1997. Much of the 1929 construction still remains, such as the brass rails, the brass and iron exterior metalwork, the mahogany lined VIP rooms and the coffer-vaulted plaster ceiling of the mezzanine bar. However, the majority of the Bowery Ballroom today is new construction to support a state-of-the-art music venue.
NYC - LES: Clinton Street Graffiti Clinton Street was named by Henry Rutgers, whoese property the street ran through, in 1792 for George Clinton. Clinton and Rutgers led the successful campaign for Thomas Jefferson's presidency. Clinton was the first governor of New York State from 1777 to 1795, and then served again from 1801 and 1804. He also had the distinction of serving as Vice President under both Jefferson and James Madison.
NYC - East Village: Chico's Loaisada This mural, on Avenue C, by local artist Antonio Garcia, known simply as Chico tells the story of Loisaida, the Spanglish term for Lower East Side. The neighorhood is filled with Chico's renegade work which dates back to the early 80's when he used to tag old redbird subway cars. He is often credited with transforming subway graffiti into a more accepted art form. His first mural — long gone — was a jab at then President Reagan: a tank driving toward the words "World War III." Then local businesses offered to pay him $100, then more, to paint walls near their stores creating an eclectic range of art.
NYC - Little Italy: Lombardi's Pizzeria According to documented history, Lombardi's was the first American pizzeria. Pizza didn't gain its popularity until just after World War II, but Lombardi's, opened by Gennaro Lombardi, began selling pizza in New York City in 1905, so you might say Gennaro is the father of American pizza. Lombardi's was originally a grocery store, but it soon became a popular stop for workers looking for something to take to work for lunch. Gennaro started selling tomato pies, which were wrapped in paper and tied with a string, and the many workers of Italian descent would take them to the job site. Most could not afford the entire pie, so it was often sold by the piece. There was no set price or size, so you asked for whatever lets say 2 cents would buy and you were given portion of what was equal to the amount offered. Gennaro's son, John, took over after Gennaro passed away and the business eventually went to Genarro's grandson, Jerry. Over the years, Lombardi's continued to sell pizza, becoming a cult-like Mecca for pizza enthusiasts. In 1984, Lombardi's closed its doors. In 1994, John Brescio, who was a childhood friend of Gennaro's grandson, Jerry, started talking to Jerry about reopening Lombardi's and in that same year they did, but not in the same location. They moved a block down the street to 32 Spring Street. For more details on Little Italy, see this picture.
NYC - Little Italy: Lombardi's Pizzeria - Capone bobblehead According to documented history, Lombardi's was the first American pizzeria. Pizza didn't gain its popularity until just after World War II, but Lombardi's, opened by Gennaro Lombardi, began selling pizza in New York City in 1905, so you might say Gennaro is the father of American pizza. Lombardi's was originally a grocery store, but it soon became a popular stop for workers looking for something to take to work for lunch. Gennaro started selling tomato pies, which were wrapped in paper and tied with a string, and the many workers of Italian descent would take them to the job site. Most could not afford the entire pie, so it was often sold by the piece. There was no set price or size, so you asked for whatever lets say 2 cents would buy and you were given portion of what was equal to the amount offered. Gennaro's son, John, took over after Gennaro passed away and the business eventually went to Genarro's grandson, Jerry. Over the years, Lombardi's continued to sell pizza, becoming a cult-like Mecca for pizza enthusiasts. In 1984, Lombardi's closed its doors. In 1994, John Brescio, who was a childhood friend of Gennaro's grandson, Jerry, started talking to Jerry about reopening Lombardi's and in that same year they did, but not in the same location. They moved a block down the street to 32 Spring Street. For more details on Little Italy, see this picture.
NYC - Little Italy: Lombardi's Pizzeria According to documented history, Lombardi's was the first American pizzeria. Pizza didn't gain its popularity until just after World War II, but Lombardi's, opened by Gennaro Lombardi, began selling pizza in New York City in 1905, so you might say Gennaro is the father of American pizza. Lombardi's was originally a grocery store, but it soon became a popular stop for workers looking for something to take to work for lunch. Gennaro started selling tomato pies, which were wrapped in paper and tied with a string, and the many workers of Italian descent would take them to the job site. Most could not afford the entire pie, so it was often sold by the piece. There was no set price or size, so you asked for whatever lets say 2 cents would buy and you were given portion of what was equal to the amount offered. Gennaro's son, John, took over after Gennaro passed away and the business eventually went to Genarro's grandson, Jerry. Over the years, Lombardi's continued to sell pizza, becoming a cult-like Mecca for pizza enthusiasts. In 1984, Lombardi's closed its doors. In 1994, John Brescio, who was a childhood friend of Gennaro's grandson, Jerry, started talking to Jerry about reopening Lombardi's and in that same year they did, but not in the same location. They moved a block down the street to 32 Spring Street. For more details on Little Italy, see this picture.
NYC - Little Italy: Lombardi's Pizzeria - Mona Lisa Smile According to documented history, Lombardi's was the first American pizzeria. Pizza didn't gain its popularity until just after World War II, but Lombardi's, opened by Gennaro Lombardi, began selling pizza in New York City in 1905, so you might say Gennaro is the father of American pizza. Lombardi's was originally a grocery store, but it soon became a popular stop for workers looking for something to take to work for lunch. Gennaro started selling tomato pies, which were wrapped in paper and tied with a string, and the many workers of Italian descent would take them to the job site. Most could not afford the entire pie, so it was often sold by the piece. There was no set price or size, so you asked for whatever lets say 2 cents would buy and you were given portion of what was equal to the amount offered. Gennaro's son, John, took over after Gennaro passed away and the business eventually went to Genarro's grandson, Jerry. Over the years, Lombardi's continued to sell pizza, becoming a cult-like Mecca for pizza enthusiasts. In 1984, Lombardi's closed its doors. In 1994, John Brescio, who was a childhood friend of Gennaro's grandson, Jerry, started talking to Jerry about reopening Lombardi's and in that same year they did, but not in the same location. They moved a block down the street to 32 Spring Street. For more details on Little Italy, see this picture.
NYC - Little Italy: Police Building The Police Building Apartments, formerly the Police Headquarters Building, at 240 Centre Street, was built in 1905-09 to the design of Hoppin, Koen & Huntington. Following the creation of Greater New York in 1898, the city's police department expanded rapidly and a large new headquarters building was planned. In 1905 Mayor George McClellan laid the cornerstone of this limestome-faced, steel-framed Edwardian Baroque/Beaux-Artspalace capped with a tall dome. When the Police Department relocated in 1973, there was talk of turning it into everything from a hotel to a community center for Little Italy. In 1983 a development group converted the building into luxury apartments. The Police Building Apartments were designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978. National Register #80002690 (1980)
NYC - Little Italy: Police Building The Police Building Apartments, formerly the Police Headquarters Building, at 240 Centre Street, was built in 1905-09 to the design of Hoppin, Koen & Huntington. Following the creation of Greater New York in 1898, the city's police department expanded rapidly and a large new headquarters building was planned. In 1905 Mayor George McClellan laid the cornerstone of this limestome-faced, steel-framed Edwardian Baroque/Beaux-Artspalace capped with a tall dome. When the Police Department relocated in 1973, there was talk of turning it into everything from a hotel to a community center for Little Italy. In 1983 a development group converted the building into luxury apartments. The Police Building Apartments were designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978. National Register #80002690 (1980)
NYC - Little Italy: Police Building The Police Building Apartments, formerly the Police Headquarters Building, at 240 Centre Street, was built in 1905-09 to the design of Hoppin, Koen & Huntington. Following the creation of Greater New York in 1898, the city's police department expanded rapidly and a large new headquarters building was planned. In 1905 Mayor George McClellan laid the cornerstone of this limestome-faced, steel-framed Edwardian Baroque/Beaux-Artspalace capped with a tall dome. When the Police Department relocated in 1973, there was talk of turning it into everything from a hotel to a community center for Little Italy. In 1983 a development group converted the building into luxury apartments. The Police Building Apartments were designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978. National Register #80002690 (1980)
NYC - Chinatown: Capitale (former Bowery Savings Bank) Located at 130 Bowery, Capitale’s 40,000 square foot space is not only impressive in size, but also in structure. Stanford White's Roman classic 1895 landmark that served as the first Bowery Savings Bank is adorned with Corinthian columns, Venetian glass, marble mosaic floors and a 65-foot high decorated coved ceiling with an art glass skylight. Capitale is a multi-level, multi-room venue equipped to accommodate private parties from 2 to 1,300 guests The Bowery Savings Bank exterior was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. The interior was designated in 1994. (Designation List 121) National Historic Register #80002672
NYC - Chinatown: Capitale (former Bowery Savings Bank) Located at 130 Bowery, Capitale’s 40,000 square foot space is not only impressive in size, but also in structure. Stanford White's Roman classic 1895 landmark that served as the first Bowery Savings Bank is adorned with Corinthian columns, Venetian glass, marble mosaic floors and a 65-foot high decorated coved ceiling with an art glass skylight. Capitale is a multi-level, multi-room venue equipped to accommodate private parties from 2 to 1,300 guests The Bowery Savings Bank exterior was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. The interior was designated in 1994. (Designation List 121) National Historic Register #80002672
NYC - Chinatown: Capitale (former Bowery Savings Bank) Located at 130 Bowery, Capitale’s 40,000 square foot space is not only impressive in size, but also in structure. Stanford White's Roman classic 1895 landmark that served as the first Bowery Savings Bank is adorned with Corinthian columns, Venetian glass, marble mosaic floors and a 65-foot high decorated coved ceiling with an art glass skylight. Capitale is a multi-level, multi-room venue equipped to accommodate private parties from 2 to 1,300 guests The Bowery Savings Bank exterior was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. The interior was designated in 1994. (Designation List 121) National Historic Register #80002672
NYC - Chinatown: Capitale (Former Bowery Savings Bank) Located at 130 Bowery, Capitale’s 40,000 square foot space is not only impressive in size, but also in structure. This Roman classic 1895 landmark that served as the first Bowery Savings Bank is adorned with Corinthian columns, Venetian glass, marble mosaic floors and a 65-foot high decorated coved ceiling with an art glass skylight. Capitale is a multi-level, multi-room venue equipped to accommodate private parties from 2 to 1,300 guests The Bowery Savings Bank exterior was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. The interior was designated in 1994. (Designation List 121) National Historic Register #80002672
NYC: 99 Church Street 99 Church Street, built in 1951, contains 11-floors and 441,000 square feet of space. Otherwise nondescript the 161-foot box-like building boasts an entrance adorned with a gilded bas relief showing a frontiersman and a factory working clasping hands over the bounties of agriculture and industry. Insribed below it is an epigraph of Daniel Webster's dating from the 1830's: * Credit * * * * Man's Confidence in Man * * * Commercial credit is the creation of modern times and belongs in its hightest perfection only to the most enlightened and best-governed nations. Credit is the vital air of modern commerce. It has done more, a thousand times more, to enrich nations than all the mines of the world. In November 2006, real estate investor Larry A. Silverstein agreed to buy the building at 99 Church Street from Moody's for $170 million. In 2007, Moody's moved its headquarters into 7 World Trade Center.
NYC - Civic Center: Woolworth Building The Woolworth Building was built in 1911-1913 for the Woolworth retail chain company. Frank W. Woolworth bought the long-coveted tract of land on Broadway opposite City Hall Park in 1909 and hired Cass Gilbert as architect; Gilbert urged his client to make the new headquarters the tallest building in the world. Woolworth, in turn, influenced by his travels to Europe, wanted his architect to design it in neo-Gothic style. After several redesigns, one higher than the other, finally to exceed the rivalling Metropolitan Life Tower, the foundations were laid in August 1911 and, at the rate of one and a half storeys a week, the 60-storey building was completed two years later. Rising from a 27-storey base, with limestone and granite lower floors, the tower is clad in white terra-cotta and capped with an elaborate set-back Gothic top, with the spire rising to the height of 241.5 m. It was to be the tallest building in the world for 17 years, until the 40 Wall Street exceeded its height. The building boasts a highly decorated, three-storey marble lobby in the plan form of a latin cross, with semicircular arches, bronze ornaments and sculpted corbels on the walls (one of which represents Mr. Woolworth himself counting his dimes) and the vaulted ceiling decorated with glass mosaic in Byzantine style. No wonder the building was dubbed the "Cathedral of Commerce." The building was opened in April 1913 with a gala for 800 persons, and the building's lights were switched on by President Wilson from the White House in Washington, D.C. In 1980 the building exterior was restored to its original splendour, an assignment that cost more than the original construction work. The Woolworth chain eventually went out of business and its successor, the Venator Group, sold the building to the Witkoff Group for $155 million in June 1998. The NY University's School of Continuing and Professional Studies will expand to the first three office floors of the building (8,700 m²), with a separate entrance lobby on Barclay Street, equipped with new escalators. Also the top half of the building is facing new use, the space being converted into 145 luxury condominiums, designed by Costas Kondylis. In 2007, the Woolworth Building was ranked #44 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #66000554
NYC - Civic Center: Woolworth Building The Woolworth Building was built in 1911-1913 for the Woolworth retail chain company. Frank W. Woolworth bought the long-coveted tract of land on Broadway opposite City Hall Park in 1909 and hired Cass Gilbert as architect; Gilbert urged his client to make the new headquarters the tallest building in the world. Woolworth, in turn, influenced by his travels to Europe, wanted his architect to design it in neo-Gothic style. After several redesigns, one higher than the other, finally to exceed the rivalling Metropolitan Life Tower, the foundations were laid in August 1911 and, at the rate of one and a half storeys a week, the 60-storey building was completed two years later. Rising from a 27-storey base, with limestone and granite lower floors, the tower is clad in white terra-cotta and capped with an elaborate set-back Gothic top, with the spire rising to the height of 241.5 m. It was to be the tallest building in the world for 17 years, until the 40 Wall Street exceeded its height. The building boasts a highly decorated, three-storey marble lobby in the plan form of a latin cross, with semicircular arches, bronze ornaments and sculpted corbels on the walls (one of which represents Mr. Woolworth himself counting his dimes) and the vaulted ceiling decorated with glass mosaic in Byzantine style. No wonder the building was dubbed the "Cathedral of Commerce." The building was opened in April 1913 with a gala for 800 persons, and the building's lights were switched on by President Wilson from the White House in Washington, D.C. In 1980 the building exterior was restored to its original splendour, an assignment that cost more than the original construction work. The Woolworth chain eventually went out of business and its successor, the Venator Group, sold the building to the Witkoff Group for $155 million in June 1998. The NY University's School of Continuing and Professional Studies will expand to the first three office floors of the building (8,700 m²), with a separate entrance lobby on Barclay Street, equipped with new escalators. Also the top half of the building is facing new use, the space being converted into 145 luxury condominiums, designed by Costas Kondylis. In 2007, the Woolworth Building was ranked #44 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #66000554
NYC Civic Center: Nathan Hale City Hall Park - Alexander Calder in New York - Le chien en trois couleurs With five of his large metal stabiles (freestanding, nonmoving sculptures) on display in City Hall Park from April 2006 - March 2007, "Alexander Calder in New York" is the first multi-work presentation of the artist's iconic sculptures in New York's outdoor spaces. Alexander Calder is one of the 20th century's most inventive and influential artists, and his mobiles (hanging sculptures) and monumental stabiles (freestanding sculptures) are among the most beloved and iconic works of American art. The dynamic black, red, and blue stabile La chien en trois couleurs (Three-Colored Dog) (1973) exemplifies his interest in color. Other works in the exhibit include Jerusalem Stable and The Cock's Comb Nathan Hale Park, or City Hall Park, called the Common in the 18th century when it was at the northern edge of the city on a triangular plot formed by the confluence of the Bloomingdale Road (now Broadway) and the Boston Post Road (now Park Row and father north, the Bowery). On the Common a prison was constructed, and nearby, a poor house, as well as a powder house and barracks as part of the city’s defenses. After the Revolution, the city entered a new era of prosperity and growth that required the construction of a new City Hall. The park was enlarged to its present size in the late 1930’s with he razing of the old Federal Building that occupied most of the southern corner of the triangle and housed a post office and court. City Hall National Register #66000539
NYC: City Hall New York City Hall, on Murray Street between Broadway and Park Row, is the seat of government of the City of New York. City Hall houses the mayor's office and the New York City Council. The New York City Hall building was designed by John McComb, Jr. and Joseph François Mangin. Construction of the City Hall building began in 1803 and was completed in 1812. The design of New York City Hall combines two popular historical architectural elements. The marble and granite exterior facade reflects the French Renaissance while the interior of the building reflects American-Georgian style. The building consists of a central pavilion with two wings. City Hall is entered via a sweeping staircase, which has figured prominently in civic events for more than a century and a half and leads up to the one-story portico, fronting the building. The portico’s roof is surrounded by a balustrade which forms a balcony outside the Governor’s Room’s five large, arched windows. The domed tower in the centre of City Hall was rebuilt in 1917 after the last of two major fires. The building's distinctive cupola has served as a model for spires on other buildings, notably Eliot House at Harvard University. City Hall was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. The interior was designated in 1976. (Designation List 64) National Register #66000539
NYC: Pace University - 1 Pace Plaza
NYC - Civic Center: City Hall - Jerusalem Stabile (1:3 intermediate maquette) With five of his large metal stabiles (freestanding, nonmoving sculptures) on display in City Hall Park from April 2006 - March 2007, "Alexander Calder in New York" is the first multi-work presentation of the artist's iconic sculptures in New York's outdoor spaces. Alexander Calder is one of the 20th century's most inventive and influential artists, and his mobiles (hanging sculptures) and monumental stabiles (freestanding sculptures) are among the most beloved and iconic works of American art. The centerpiece of the exhibition is a vibrant red sculpture, Jerusalem Stabile (1:3 intermediate maquette) (1976), a one-third scale version of one of Calder's last major commissions, a permanent work in Jerusalem, Israel. Spanning 24 feet, this steel maquette is monumental in its own right. From its position on the sidewalk on the eastern side of City Hall Park, Jerusalem Stabile is be visible from the Brooklyn Bridge. Other works in the exhibit include Le chien en trois couleurs and The Cock's Comb City Hall National Register #66000539
NYC: Brooklyn Bridge - City Hall Subway Station (IRT) A replica of one of the original subway entrance kiosks, although this one is designed to provide elevator service to the 4, 5 and 6 subway lines below. National Register #05000674
NYC: The Municipal Building The Municipal Building, at 1 Centre St., was designed by William M. Kendall of McKim, Mead & White, and built in 1909-1915 as the joint administration offices for the Greater New York, created after the annexation of Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island to Manhattan in 1898. After two inconclusive design competitions to replace the City Hall in 1888 and 1893, and a law was signed that prohibited its replacement in 1894, the site of the 1907 competition was shifted to a plot to the north-east, originally meant for an extension of the Brooklyn Building trolley terminal. The selection was made in 1908 and the next year work on this behemoth with 60,400 m² of office space -- a feature that helped the design to win the competition -- was begun. The first occupants moved to the building in January 1913, two years before work on it was completed. The building was influenced by the fashionable "City Beautiful" movement of the 1890s which promoted plans for creating public buildings in landscaped parks. The mid-part of the 25-storey tripartite facade is a U-shaped mass of austere light-toned granite over a high colonnade that forms the building's base and separates a front yard from the sidewalk. The top portion of the building features a colonnade of Corinthian columns and pilasters. The 16-storey top, above the middle section of the building, consists of a set-back tiered lantern on top of a square base, flanked by four smaller pinnacle turrets, symbolizing the four boroughs joined to Manhattan. At the height of 177 m stands the 6 m high statue Civic Fame by Adolph A. Weinman, New York City's second largest statue after the Statue of Liberty. This building impressed Josif Stalin so much that the Moscow University main building (1949-1953) was later based on it -- as well as, in general, the whole grandiose public building style in the Soviet Union. The building has an entrance to the Chambers Street subway station (1915), the first of many such connections to come. An archway leads through the mid-facade (a closed portion of Chambers St.) to the Police Headquarters across the landscaped Police Plaza. The Municipal Building was designed a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. National Register #72000879 (1972)
NYC: City Hall - Horace Greeley statue The statue of Horace Greeley in City Hall Park was executed in 1890 by John Quincy Adams Ward, and was moved here from its former site in front of the Tribune Building in 1916. Ward's sculpture is typical of post-Civil War realism and captures the relaxed attitude, moon face, and odd beard of the Tribune's founder. The base is by Richard Morris Hunt. Greeley founded and edited the New York Tribune, which was published in a since demolished building across Park Row. Greeley was an outspoken reformer and fighter for social justice. He attacked slavery, championed women's rights, promoted labor unions, fought railroad monopolies, promoted westward expansion and waged an unsuccessful campaign for the Presidency in 1872.
NYC: Municipal Building and US Courthouse The Municipal Building (1 Centre St.), designed by William M. Kendall of McKim, Mead & White, was built in 1909-1915 as the joint administration offices for the Greater New York, created after the annexation of Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island to Manhattan in 1898. The building was influenced by the fashionable "City Beautiful" movement of the 1890s which promoted plans for creating public buildings in landscaped parks. The mid-part of the 25-storey tripartite facade is a U-shaped mass of austere light-toned granite over a high colonnade that forms the building's base and separates a front yard from the sidewalk. The top portion of the building features a colonnade of Corinthian columns and pilasters. The 16-storey top, above the middle section of the building, consists of a set-back tiered lantern on top of a square base, flanked by four smaller pinnacle turrets, symbolizing the four boroughs joined to Manhattan. At the height of 177 m stands the 6 m high statue Civic Fame by Adolph A. Weinman, New York City's second largest statue after the Statue of Liberty. This building impressed Josif Stalin so much that the Moscow University main building (1949-1953) was later based on it -- as well as, in general, the whole grandiose public building style in the Soviet Union. The Municipal Building was designed a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. The U.S. Courthouse was built as the Federal courthouse in New York City. Design work was started in 1933 and, after Cass Gilbert's (Woolworth Building) death the next year, supervised by his son until its completion in 1936. The six-storey base of the building is reminiscent of a Classical temple with its pilastered facades and colonnaded entrance, and rising from this is the sturdy 32-storey tower, topped by a pyramidal roof clad in gilded terra-cotta and a lantern. Municipal Building National Register #72000879 (1972)
NYC: Subway
NYC: Excelisor Power Co Building The spectacular Excelsior Power Company Building cast iron sign has been hidden here on 33 Gold Street since 1888. The Queen Anne style building was designed by William Grinnell.
NYC - South Street Seaport Museum - Titanic Memorial Lighthouse The Titanic Memorial Lighthouse is a memorial to the passengers, officers and crew who died as heroes when the steamship Titanic sank after collision with an iceberg on April 15, 1912 at LATITUDE 41° 46' NORTH LONGITUDE 50° 14' WEST The Lighthouse was originally erected by public subscription in 1913, it stood above the East River on the roof of the old Seamen's Church Institute at the corner of South Street and Coenties Slip. From 1913 to 1967, the time ball at the top of the Lighthouse would drop down the pole to signal twelve noon to the ships in the Harbor. This time ball mechanism was activated by a telegraphic signal from the National Observatory in Washington, D.C. It sits within the South Street Seaport Hisoric District and Extension, which was designated a historic district by the New York City Landmarks Preservation commission in 1977 and 1989. South Street Seaport National Register #72000883 South Street Seaport Historic District National Register #72000884
NYC: Historic Fulton District - No 251 Water St It sits within the South Street Seaport Hisoric District and Extension, which was designated a historic district by the New York City Landmarks Preservation commission in 1977 and 1989. South Street Seaport National Register #72000883 South Street Seaport Historic District National Register #72000884
Brooklyn Bridge - A View from the Seaport For more information on the Brooklyn Bridge, see this picture. For more of my pictures of the Brooklyn Bridge, click here. This picture was taken from within the South Street Seaport Hisoric District and Extension, which was designated a historic district by the New York City Landmarks Preservation commission in 1977 and 1989. The Brooklyn Bridge was designated a landmark by the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1967. Brooklyn Bridge National Register #66000523 South Street Seaport National Register #72000883 South Street Seaport Historic District National Register #72000884
Brooklyn Bridge - A View from the Seaport1 For more information on the Brooklyn Bridge, see this picture. For more of my pictures of the Brooklyn Bridge, click here. This picture was taken from within the South Street Seaport Hisoric District and Extension, which was designated a historic district by the New York City Landmarks Preservation commission in 1977 and 1989. The Brooklyn Bridge was designated a landmark by the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1967. Brooklyn Bridge National Register #66000523 South Street Seaport National Register #72000883 South Street Seaport Historic District National Register #72000884
NYC: South Street Seaport and Ambrose Now known by her last official designation "Ambrose," NO. 87 was built (1907) to serve as the first lightship on the newly established Nantucket station, where she served to guide mariners into the nation's busiest port, New York. NO. 87 is also important in the history of radio, being the first successful shipboard radio beacon used to guide ships at long distances in poor weather. It sits within the South Street Seaport Hisoric District and Extension, which was designated a historic district by the New York City Landmarks Preservation commission in 1977 and 1989. Amborse National Register #84002758 South Street Seaport National Register #72000883 South Street Seaport Historic District National Register #72000884
NYC: South Street Seaport and Ambrose Now known by her last official designation "Ambrose," NO. 87 was built (1907) to serve as the first lightship on the newly established Nantucket station, where she served to guide mariners into the nation's busiest port, New York. NO. 87 is also important in the history of radio, being the first successful shipboard radio beacon used to guide ships at long distances in poor weather. It sits within the South Street Seaport Hisoric District and Extension, which was designated a historic district by the New York City Landmarks Preservation commission in 1977 and 1989. Ambrose National Register #84002758 South Street Seaport National Register #72000883 South Street Seaport Historic District National Register #7200088
NYC: South Street Seaport and Ambrose Now known by her last official designation "Ambrose," NO. 87 was built (1907) to serve as the first lightship on the newly established Nantucket station, where she served to guide mariners into the nation's busiest port, New York. NO. 87 is also important in the history of radio, being the first successful shipboard radio beacon used to guide ships at long distances in poor weather. It sits within the South Street Seaport Hisoric District and Extension, which was designated a historic district by the New York City Landmarks Preservation commission in 1977 and 1989. Ambrose National Register #84002758 South Street Seaport National Register #72000883 South Street Seaport Historic District National Register #72000884
Boston: Dont Dump - Drains to Charles River
Boston: Landsdowne Street - Bill's Bar & Lounge Located a few short doors down from Manny Ramirez’ favorite launching pad, Bill’s Bar & Lounge (5 Landsdowne St) is the unofficial Dirty Rock Club of Lansdowne Street, harkening back to Boston’s rock n’ roll glory days. With live shows each night, Bill’s features the sleaziest grind on the strip, from nationally touring metal bands to the best of a blossoming local indie scene.
Boston: Skyline from Fenway Park The view of the Boston Skyline from Fenway Park.
Boston - Mass Pike and Skyline The Massachusetts Turnpike is the easternmost 138-mile (222 km) stretch of Interstate 90. I-90 and the "Mass Pike" both begin at Logan International Airport in East Boston where they meet Route 1A. The Mass Pike then extends to the western border of the state at West Stockbridge where it ends. The roadway itself continues across the border into New York as I-90 and the Berkshire Connector portion of the New York State Thruway. Plans for the Turnpike date back to at least 1948, when the Western Expressway was being planned. The original section would have connected Boston's Inner Belt to Newton with connections with US 20 and Route 30 for traffic continuing west. Later extensions would take the road to and beyond Worcester. For more details on the Hancock tower, see this picture. For more details on the Prudential Tower, see this picture. For more details on 111 Huntington Avenue, see this picture.
Boston - Kenmore Square: Citgo Kenmore Square exists at the intersection of several Beacon Street, Commonwealth Avenue and Brookline Avenue, abutting Boston University and serving as a transportation hub for nearby Landsdowne Street and Fenway Park. The large, double-faced sign featuring the Citgo "trimark" logo has become a landmark, partly because of its visibility over the Green Monster during televised Red Sox games. The current 60 ft x 60 ft incarnation, unveiled in March 2005 after a six-month restoration project, features thousands of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LEDs were selected for their durability, energy efficiency, intensity, and ease of maintenance. Earlier versions featured neon lighting; the previous sign contained some 5,878 glass tubes with a total length of over five miles. The first sign, featuring the Cities Service logo, was built in 1940, and replaced with the trimark in 1965. In 1979 Governor Edward J. King ordered it turned off as a symbol of energy conservation. Four years later, Citgo attempted to disassemble the weatherbeaten sign, and was surprised to be met with widespread public affection for the sign and protest at its threatened removal. The Boston Landmarks Commission ordered its disassembly postponed while the issue was debated. While never formally declared a landmark, it was refurbished and relit by Citgo in 1983 and has remained in operation ever since. Citgo is now a subidiary of Petróleos de Venezuela S.A. and in 2006, Jerry McDermott, a Boston city councillor, proposed that the sign be removed in response to Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's insults toward America . McDermontt also suggested draping an American flag or Boston Red Sox banner over the sign until Chavez is out of office.
Boston - Kenmore Square: Citgo Kenmore Square exists at the intersection of several Beacon Street, Commonwealth Avenue and Brookline Avenue, abutting Boston University and serving as a transportation hub for nearby Landsdowne Street and Fenway Park. The large, double-faced sign featuring the Citgo "trimark" logo has become a landmark, partly because of its visibility over the Green Monster during televised Red Sox games. The current 60 ft x 60 ft incarnation, unveiled in March 2005 after a six-month restoration project, features thousands of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LEDs were selected for their durability, energy efficiency, intensity, and ease of maintenance. Earlier versions featured neon lighting; the previous sign contained some 5,878 glass tubes with a total length of over five miles. The first sign, featuring the Cities Service logo, was built in 1940, and replaced with the trimark in 1965. In 1979 Governor Edward J. King ordered it turned off as a symbol of energy conservation. Four years later, Citgo attempted to disassemble the weatherbeaten sign, and was surprised to be met with widespread public affection for the sign and protest at its threatened removal. The Boston Landmarks Commission ordered its disassembly postponed while the issue was debated. While never formally declared a landmark, it was refurbished and relit by Citgo in 1983 and has remained in operation ever since. Citgo is now a subidiary of Petróleos de Venezuela S.A. and in 2006, Jerry McDermott, a Boston city councillor, proposed that the sign be removed in response to Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's insults toward America . McDermontt also suggested draping an American flag or Boston Red Sox banner over the sign until Chavez is out of office.
Boston - Copley Square: DNC 04 - Eyes Wide Open - 1000 pairs of shoes These 1000 pairs of shoes represent a small fraction of the estimated 16,000 Iraqis killed in the war. An Exhibition on the Human Costs of the Iraq War by the American Friends Service Commitee - A protest on the War in Iraq during the 2004 Democratic National Convention (DNC).
Boston - Back Bay: Prudential Tower and Hancock Tower The Prudential Tower (part of the Prudential Center complex) is Boston's second-tallest skyscraper after the John Hancock Tower. Floor space within the tower stands at 1.2 million square feet. It was designed by Charles Luckman and Associates for Prudential Insurance. Completed in 1964, the building is 759 ft (229 m) tall and has 52 floors. A 50th floor observation deck, called the "Prudential Skywalk", is currently the highest observation deck in New England that is open to the public. The 52nd floor holds the restaurant and bar, "Top of the Hub." It was the tallest building in the world outside New York on completion, surpassing Cleveland's Terminal Tower. Today, the Pru, as it is called by locals, is no longer even among the fifty tallest buildings in the USA. When it was built, the New York Times called it "the showcase of the New Boston [representing] the agony and the ecstasy of a city striving to rise above the sordidness of its recent past". But Ada Louise Huxtable called it "a flashy 52-story glass and aluminum tower... [part of]] an over-scaled megalomaniac group shockingly unrelated to the city's size, standards, or style. It is a slick developer's model dropped into an urban renewal slot in Anycity, U.S.A.—a textbook example of urban character assassination." Two decades later, architecture writer Donlyn Lyndon called it "an energetically ugly, square shaft that offends the Boston skyline more than any other structure." For more details on the Hancock tower, see this picture. In 2007, The John Hancock Tower was ranked #142 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list.
NJ - Hoboken: Castle Point Lookout Steven's Institute of Technology's Castle Point Lookout is the highest elevation in Hoboken at 100 feet. The green-veined, serpentine rock overlook was mentioned in the log by the navigator in Henry Hudson's ship Half Moon in 1609 as it journeyed up the river. A pavilion was erected in Elysian Fields by Col. John Stevens in 1830 and later was turned into a hotel which faced the Hudson River. In 1888 when the hotel was torn down by the Stevens family, a cannon was excavated whose legend dated back to the Revolutionary War. It was believed to be brought over from France during the Revolution. It was placed on Castle Point where the Stevens Family resided and is still there as a protector of the Point.
NJ - Hoboken: Castle Point Lookout Steven's Institute of Technology's Castle Point Lookout is the highest elevation in Hoboken at 100 feet. The green-veined, serpentine rock overlook was mentioned in the log by the navigator in Henry Hudson's ship Half Moon in 1609 as it journeyed up the river. A pavilion was erected in Elysian Fields by Col. John Stevens in 1830 and later was turned into a hotel which faced the Hudson River. In 1888 when the hotel was torn down by the Stevens family, a cannon was excavated whose legend dated back to the Revolutionary War. It was believed to be brought over from France during the Revolution. It was placed on Castle Point where the Stevens Family resided and is still there as a protector of the Point.
NJ - Hoboken: Sinatra Park - NYC Skyline
NYC - FiDi: Trinity Church Trinity Church, prominently located at the terminus of Wall Street at 79 Broadway, is the oldest Episcopal church in New York City, having been consecrated on Ascension Day May 1, 1846. Designed by architect Richard Upjohn, Trinity is considered a classic example of Gothic Revival architecture. At the time of its completion, the 281-foot spire was the highest point in New York until being surpassed in 1890 by the New York World Building. The Trinity Church parish received its initial charter from King William III of England in 1697. The first Trinity Church building, a modest rectangular structure with a gambrel roof and small porch was constructed in 1698. The building was destroyed in the Great New York City Fire of 1776, in the early days of the military occupation by the British during the American Revolutionary War. Construction on the second building began in 1788, which was consecrated in 1790 and then torn down after being weakened by severe snows during the winter of 1838–39. By the early 1840's, the church's expanding parish had split. The newly formed parish would build Grace Church, to the north on Broadway at 10th street, while the original parish would re-build the Trinity that stands today. Upjohn designed the new Church in Neo-Gothic fashion, complete with sandstone and stained-glass windows--two features unheard of at the time. Adorned with Gothic spires and pointed arches, and sporting a very linear upward-appearing exterior, the design reflected "High Church" fashion, at odds with contemporary Protestant "Low Church" thought. As a compromise, the side walls were kept simple, without the flying buttresses predominant in most Gothic structures. In 1876-1877 a reredos and altar was erected in memory of William Backhouse Astor, Sr., to the designs of architect Frederick Clarke Withers. In 1893, three sets of ornate hevy bronze doors, the Astor Memorial doors, conceived by Richard Morris Hunt and sculpted by J. Massey Rhind, Karl Bitter and Charles Henry Niehaus, were added. The adjoining Trinity Churchyard Cemetery, opened in 1697, is one of three separate burial grounds that make up the non-denominational Trinity Church Cemetery (the others being the Churchyard of St. Paul's Chapel and the Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum at the Chapel of Intercession). Among the 1,186 interred here are Alexander Hamilton, William Bradford, Robert Fulton (memorial tribute), Captain James Lawrence, Horatio Gates, and Albert Gallatin. There are also memorials to the unknown martyrs of the Revolution buried on the grounds, 16 officers of the Continental Army and Navy buried in the church cemeteries, and to the thousands of Americans who died in prison ships in New York Harbor. Trinity Church and Graveyard was designated a landmark by the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966. National Register #76001252 (1982)

1   2   3   4   5    

← Назад

@VFL_RU Uptime по данным Ping-Admin.Ru - сервиса мониторинга доступности сайтов
Версия для мобильных устройств.
Концепция, программирование и дизайн проекта — «Седжин».
© VFL.RU 2001–2020